Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • MrsSippi
    • By MrsSippi 9th Oct 17, 2:11 PM
    • 209Posts
    • 338Thanks
    MrsSippi
    Advice needed re: diet for 6 year old
    • #1
    • 9th Oct 17, 2:11 PM
    Advice needed re: diet for 6 year old 9th Oct 17 at 2:11 PM
    I have a 6 yo daughter and I am slightly worried about her weight. Maybe worried is a bit strong but you get the idea....

    She has always been on the slim side anyway but now she looks almost skinny. She was weighed and measured a couple of years ago as part of the Reception Heights and Weights programme and it came back that she was a healthy weight.

    I would like to know what other people with kids (esp daughters) of the same age eat so I can gauge if she's eating enough. I really don't think she has any issues with food or anything and will quite often say she's hungry but she just doesn't seem to put much weight on. I don't really want to take her to the gp or anything as I don't think it's needed yet. She is always quite active.

    Generally she will have a bowl of cereal/boiled eggs/toast for breakfast. I have tried to give her more but she says she's full up. She will often have a piece of fruit on the way to school then she has fruit mid morning as well as a hot lunch (which she says she eats most of - i dont think she's lying about this and I know the school contacts parents if your child is consistently undereating). She has a snack of a sandwich or similar on way home from school then a cup of milk/crackers/yoghurt when she gets in then a cooked meal when DH gets home.

    Is this not enough? I would love some advice on this ......
Page 1
    • pinkshoes
    • By pinkshoes 9th Oct 17, 2:40 PM
    • 15,237 Posts
    • 20,735 Thanks
    pinkshoes
    • #2
    • 9th Oct 17, 2:40 PM
    • #2
    • 9th Oct 17, 2:40 PM
    This seems a completely normal amount for a 6 year old.

    Mine (boy) eats 2 slices of toast or a bowl of porridge for breakfast, school lunch, then fruit for a snack, then dinner.

    His portion sizes are quite big but he also does a lot of running about.

    Lots of 6 year olds are skinny things! As long as she is not feeling tired and run down then she is clearly getting enough energy.

    Is she very active?
    Should've = Should HAVE (not 'of')
    Would've = Would HAVE (not 'of')

    No, I am not perfect, but yes I do judge people on their use of basic English language. If you didn't know the above, then learn it! (If English is your second language, then you are forgiven!)
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 9th Oct 17, 2:42 PM
    • 60,256 Posts
    • 352,009 Thanks
    PasturesNew
    • #3
    • 9th Oct 17, 2:42 PM
    • #3
    • 9th Oct 17, 2:42 PM
    From that list ... it's possible she eats more than me some days! And I'm a bit older than 6 and in no way in danger of slipping into the cracks in the pavement.

    Maybe you're just used to seeing fatter kids these days, that doesn't make yours skinny ... but "just right".
    • MrsSippi
    • By MrsSippi 9th Oct 17, 2:54 PM
    • 209 Posts
    • 338 Thanks
    MrsSippi
    • #4
    • 9th Oct 17, 2:54 PM
    • #4
    • 9th Oct 17, 2:54 PM
    Thanks for the replies. You could well be right and she is just smaller than her classmates. She does swimming lessons too and she always seems to be the skinniest one there. She also plays a lot in the park so she is quite active. I've asked the school nursing team to just do a quick weight check when they're next in school so that should tell me definitely if it is something I should be worried about.
    • Baby Angel
    • By Baby Angel 9th Oct 17, 3:00 PM
    • 483 Posts
    • 1,089 Thanks
    Baby Angel
    • #5
    • 9th Oct 17, 3:00 PM
    • #5
    • 9th Oct 17, 3:00 PM
    That sounds like my daughter when she was 6. We used to worry as she was skinny and wouldn't want to snack on anything, like other children her age did. We made sure whatever she ate was healthy, but often encouraged her to eat more.

    She is now 10. About a year ago she started having much larger portions although nothing had changed in her lifestyle. She is constantly hungry and I thought she was gaining a bit of weight, especially around her tummy. Now we don't encourage her anymore. She still eats healthy and looks much slimmer than her peers, but her meal portions are sometimes bigger than mine So we do control what and how much she eats now, though we don't tell her that. I don't want her to be conscious of her weight or even think about it, when she is a pretty healthy and active girl.
    SPC 08 - #452 - £415
    SPC 09 - #452 - £298
    • peachyprice
    • By peachyprice 9th Oct 17, 3:11 PM
    • 18,601 Posts
    • 42,739 Thanks
    peachyprice
    • #6
    • 9th Oct 17, 3:11 PM
    • #6
    • 9th Oct 17, 3:11 PM
    I have a very slim daughter, she's always eaten like a sparrow and would rather graze than have a large meal, she's just never had the capacity for a lot of food in one go.

    She's always been perfectly fit and healthy, hit her milestones, had beautifully clear skin and strong hair and nails. Her periods came when expected etc., She did go through phases of looking more skinny when she got taller but then filled out again.

    I've never made an issue of her weight or eating habits TBH, I think that's asking for trouble. She also likes crackers/yoghurt/cereal, lol. I would just keep and eye on her and let her know it's OK to be naturally slim. There's so much publicity now days about the damage in shaming larger girls, but slim girls can suffer the same abuse from peers, especially as they get older.
    Accept your past without regret, handle your present with confidence and face your future without fear
    • Loz01
    • By Loz01 9th Oct 17, 3:11 PM
    • 1,432 Posts
    • 3,121 Thanks
    Loz01
    • #7
    • 9th Oct 17, 3:11 PM
    • #7
    • 9th Oct 17, 3:11 PM
    Sounds like me as a 6 year old! I ate normally but was always a bit of a twig mainly because I did gymnastics and football and later on karate! If she's eating "normal" amounts and 3 meals a day I wouldn't panic. Some people are just built smaller (or bigger, you get people also who worry about why their kids are big when they only eat normal sized portions)
    An apple a day keeps anyone away if you throw it hard enough
    • onlyroz
    • By onlyroz 9th Oct 17, 4:30 PM
    • 13,502 Posts
    • 25,681 Thanks
    onlyroz
    • #8
    • 9th Oct 17, 4:30 PM
    • #8
    • 9th Oct 17, 4:30 PM
    My daughter is 8 and eats like an anorexic sparrow. I was the same when I was a child and my dad used to get very stressed about it - telling me that I had to clean my plate etc etc, which I don't think is a very healthy thing to encourage.


    Your daughter's eating habits seem entirely normal.
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 9th Oct 17, 4:40 PM
    • 15,939 Posts
    • 39,730 Thanks
    FBaby
    • #9
    • 9th Oct 17, 4:40 PM
    • #9
    • 9th Oct 17, 4:40 PM
    If she's classed as healthy, she is ok. DD was very skinny for years and was even referred to hospital when her height reached the 90 percentile whilst her weight didn't make the 10 percentile, but the Pediatrician said that as long as she was engaging in activities, eating something however little, and doing ok at school, not sleeping more than normal, then she was healthy and it wasn't a health problems.

    She remained very skinny until she started secondary school and then gradually, she filled in everywhere. At 17, she is slim but not skinny any longer, 5'7'' and size 8 and can eat like a horse!
    • atolaas
    • By atolaas 9th Oct 17, 4:43 PM
    • 1,039 Posts
    • 5,154 Thanks
    atolaas
    It's difficult not to compare your child to others, but it sounds like she's eating well. Have you checked her height and weight on the growth chart in her red baby book?
    SPC7 ~ Member#390 ~ £432.45 declared
    Re-joined SW 9 Feb 2015 1 stone lost so far

    Her Serene Highness the Princess Atolaas of the Alphabetty Thread as appointed by Queen Upsidedown Bear
    • rach_k
    • By rach_k 9th Oct 17, 5:01 PM
    • 1,023 Posts
    • 1,739 Thanks
    rach_k
    Sounds normal to me. You're likely to do more harm than good if you try to make her eat more. You want her to listen to her body, not what other people think of how she looks. Sometimes my 6 year old will eat very little, other times she will eat her own body weight just for breakfast. Kids are pretty good at knowing what they need if you give them lots of healthy options and don't pressure them.

    If you're worried, you can weigh her at home (normal weighing scales are accurate enough) and plot it against her age in her red book or download the WHO charts. As long as her weight is increasing roughly in line with her height, I wouldn't worry at all. Don't weigh her often as you want the overall pattern, rather than to see that she hasn't gained weight for 3 months but then gained a load in the next month!
    • sillygoose
    • By sillygoose 9th Oct 17, 5:11 PM
    • 3,926 Posts
    • 3,984 Thanks
    sillygoose
    All sounds OK to me diet/weight wise but your quite entitled to consider it, we all want to get to right.

    My 'pet hate' is allowing grazing and wandering. Sitting eating is relatively boring when your six and probably seems like forever I bet. Especially when you have done it sooo many times before

    A friends daughter who was many might say on the light side did this a lot, nibble the nice stuff then 'full up!' and off... having had just enough to dampen the hunger pangs. She improved after they restricted it.

    I certainly wouldn't force a child to eat or clear a plate, call me old fashioned but mine were taught to stay at the table until the meal was done. Meal time was meal time, play time was play time. With no chance of escape they usually ate their proper fill. Especially if you present a realistically child sized meal, I prefer a child to easily finish a meal and ask for more than struggle or have to leave food, it puts them off.

    Of course this may be of NO relevance to you at all, in which case ignore me, I just mention it in case it helps.
    • oystercatcher
    • By oystercatcher 9th Oct 17, 7:18 PM
    • 1,679 Posts
    • 4,247 Thanks
    oystercatcher
    I see so many overweight children around. I really hope you aren't comparing your daughter with them. If the school health team say she is a healthy weight why would you not believe them ? It sounds like she is eating plenty.

    Why all this eating in the car on the way to and from school ? It doesn't sound healthy to be teaching her to constantly graze while travelling. When will that piece of fruit become a bag of crisps or a bar of chocolate ? Probably when she is old enough to travel alone and buy her own snacks ! Just give regular meals and healthy food and don't compare her with other people's obese children.
    • warehouse
    • By warehouse 9th Oct 17, 7:26 PM
    • 2,980 Posts
    • 5,567 Thanks
    warehouse
    Sounds very normal to me OP, in fact she eats better and healthier than my youngest did at the same age.
    Pants
    • MrsSippi
    • By MrsSippi 9th Oct 17, 9:04 PM
    • 209 Posts
    • 338 Thanks
    MrsSippi
    I have a very slim daughter, she's always eaten like a sparrow and would rather graze than have a large meal, she's just never had the capacity for a lot of food in one go.

    She's always been perfectly fit and healthy, hit her milestones, had beautifully clear skin and strong hair and nails. Her periods came when expected etc., She did go through phases of looking more skinny when she got taller but then filled out again.

    I've never made an issue of her weight or eating habits TBH, I think that's asking for trouble. She also likes crackers/yoghurt/cereal, lol. I would just keep and eye on her and let her know it's OK to be naturally slim. There's so much publicity now days about the damage in shaming larger girls, but slim girls can suffer the same abuse from peers, especially as they get older.
    Originally posted by peachyprice
    Thabks for the reply - to be clear though I haven't said anything to her as obviously I don't want her to be thinking about it at all. Again, I would say I'm not worried - I guess it's that I haven't got another 6 year old to compare her too and tbh even in her class there is such a variation of sizes and Weights it doesn't tell me a lot.

    I just want a bit of reassurance I guess - if it turns out she's a completely normal weight we can carry on as before but if she is underweight I know to try and tackle this a bit.
    Last edited by MrsSippi; 09-10-2017 at 9:19 PM.
    • MrsSippi
    • By MrsSippi 9th Oct 17, 9:15 PM
    • 209 Posts
    • 338 Thanks
    MrsSippi
    I see so many overweight children around. I really hope you aren't comparing your daughter with them. If the school health team say she is a healthy weight why would you not believe them ? It sounds like she is eating plenty.

    Why all this eating in the car on the way to and from school ? It doesn't sound healthy to be teaching her to constantly graze while travelling. When will that piece of fruit become a bag of crisps or a bar of chocolate ? Probably when she is old enough to travel alone and buy her own snacks ! Just give regular meals and healthy food and don't compare her with other people's obese children.
    Originally posted by oystercatcher
    I'm not comparing as such (well not in a negative way). It's more I was thinking is she a bit skinny/thin so I suppose the natural thing to do is look at others the same age. Obviously there are massive variations even within her age group but it can sometimes give a very general idea of what others are like. There are some in her year who appear a lot bigger/heavier and others who look slimmer than she does.

    FYI - she does sometimes have a bit of fruit on the way to school but a. We don't go in a car (I'm not sure why the assumption?) - we walk and b. School is about a mile away which i know isn't that far but it is quite a walk for a 6 year old and she's burnt up quite a bit of energy getting there so I don't think it hurts to give her a snack on the way, esp as it is healthy. She doesn't graze either - she has breakfast at home, a snack provided by School, lunch provided by the school, and then a snack and later tea after school. We often go to the park after school to so she's running around and burning whatever's she's eaten off then too.

    I think it's a bit presumptuous at this age for you to assume what she may or may not buy herself for snacks when she's older. Obviously I will have to trust her to be sensible when she goes to secondary school but for now I think her snacks are ok.
    Last edited by MrsSippi; 09-10-2017 at 9:20 PM.
    • MrsSippi
    • By MrsSippi 9th Oct 17, 9:15 PM
    • 209 Posts
    • 338 Thanks
    MrsSippi
    Sounds very normal to me OP, in fact she eats better and healthier than my youngest did at the same age.
    Originally posted by warehouse
    Thank you. Maybe I am over thinking it
    • MrsSippi
    • By MrsSippi 9th Oct 17, 9:18 PM
    • 209 Posts
    • 338 Thanks
    MrsSippi
    All sounds OK to me diet/weight wise but your quite entitled to consider it, we all want to get to right.

    My 'pet hate' is allowing grazing and wandering. Sitting eating is relatively boring when your six and probably seems like forever I bet. Especially when you have done it sooo many times before

    A friends daughter who was many might say on the light side did this a lot, nibble the nice stuff then 'full up!' and off... having had just enough to dampen the hunger pangs. She improved after they restricted it.

    I certainly wouldn't force a child to eat or clear a plate, call me old fashioned but mine were taught to stay at the table until the meal was done. Meal time was meal time, play time was play time. With no chance of escape they usually ate their proper fill. Especially if you present a realistically child sized meal, I prefer a child to easily finish a meal and ask for more than struggle or have to leave food, it puts them off.

    Of course this may be of NO relevance to you at all, in which case ignore me, I just mention it in case it helps.
    Originally posted by sillygoose
    Thank you for the advice. I try and offer her snacks/meals at rough set times (ie breakfast is always the same kind of time and the same with other meals/snacks) so it negates the need tocgraze but I do understand what you're saying.
    • Anoneemoose
    • By Anoneemoose 9th Oct 17, 9:34 PM
    • 1,721 Posts
    • 2,116 Thanks
    Anoneemoose
    I'm not comparing as such (well not in a negative way). It's more I was thinking is she a bit skinny/thin so I suppose the natural thing to do is look at others the same age. Obviously there are massive variations even within her age group but it can sometimes give a very general idea of what others are like. There are some in her year who appear a lot bigger/heavier and others who look slimmer than she does.

    FYI - she does sometimes have a bit of fruit on the way to school but a. We don't go in a car (I'm not sure why the assumption?) - we walk and b. School is about a mile away which i know isn't that far but it is quite a walk for a 6 year old and she's burnt up quite a bit of energy getting there so I don't think it hurts to give her a snack on the way, esp as it is healthy. She doesn't graze either - she has breakfast at home, a snack provided by School, lunch provided by the school, and then a snack and later tea after school. We often go to the park after school to so she's running around and burning whatever's she's eaten off then too.

    I think it's a bit presumptuous at this age for you to assume what she may or may not buy herself for snacks when she's older. Obviously I will have to trust her to be sensible when she goes to secondary school but for now I think her snacks are ok.
    Originally posted by MrsSippi
    I wouldn't worry about the after school snack. If she's hungry, she's hungry. As long as she's actually physically hungry - as opposed to bored etc, which it doesn't sound like at all - then she needs to eat. It sounds like you have it just right.

    My dd has always been a bit the other way and slightly 'overweight', but she eats a wide variety of food, isn't massively active as she's not a sporty person but she likes walking and bouncing like a loon on the trampoline. I used to be worried but then I learned just how rubbish the BMI calculator is, and even more so for kids. As long as she's active and happy and does eat a good variety of foods, then it sounds like she's absolutely fine.
    • choccielover
    • By choccielover 10th Oct 17, 12:21 AM
    • 361 Posts
    • 1,315 Thanks
    choccielover
    Sounds fine to me.

    My DD (5) is a skinny little thing and yet eats really well. She's just very active.
    She puts a bit of weight on then shoots up in height and is suddenly scrawny again

    That's just kids I think.

    I give her healthy snacks 95% of the time if she is hungry between meals, otherwise I give her a treat (she's a kid after all)
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

4,941Posts Today

5,649Users online

Martin's Twitter