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    • AG47
    • By AG47 8th Oct 17, 8:54 PM
    • 610Posts
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    AG47
    Getting on list for council house/housing association
    • #1
    • 8th Oct 17, 8:54 PM
    Getting on list for council house/housing association 8th Oct 17 at 8:54 PM
    How does one get on the waiting list for a council house, housing association house please ?
    Nothing has been fixed since 2008, it was just pushed into the future
Page 1
    • AG47
    • By AG47 8th Oct 17, 8:56 PM
    • 610 Posts
    • 143 Thanks
    AG47
    • #2
    • 8th Oct 17, 8:56 PM
    • #2
    • 8th Oct 17, 8:56 PM
    Somebody said you have to wait until you are in default on your rent, then get a notice from your landlord, then and only then will you get offered a house.

    But is there not a way to get on the waiting list before that?
    Nothing has been fixed since 2008, it was just pushed into the future
    • HampshireH
    • By HampshireH 8th Oct 17, 8:59 PM
    • 120 Posts
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    HampshireH
    • #3
    • 8th Oct 17, 8:59 PM
    • #3
    • 8th Oct 17, 8:59 PM
    Apply at the council. They will tell you if you are eligible for their register.

    You will have to have a local connection as a minimum.
    • elsien
    • By elsien 8th Oct 17, 8:59 PM
    • 15,171 Posts
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    elsien
    • #4
    • 8th Oct 17, 8:59 PM
    • #4
    • 8th Oct 17, 8:59 PM
    Look at your council website. There is usually an online portal that allows you to register and explains the banding system and whether or not you are eligible to apply.
    In my area there is one combined system for both council and housing association properties.

    ETA - getting on the list and getting a property are two different things. How long you wait will depend on your individual circumstances. If you're a single person with no vulnerability you will probably be waiting for years.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • HampshireH
    • By HampshireH 8th Oct 17, 9:00 PM
    • 120 Posts
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    HampshireH
    • #5
    • 8th Oct 17, 9:00 PM
    • #5
    • 8th Oct 17, 9:00 PM
    .....getting on the register doesn't mean getting a house any time soon.
    • AG47
    • By AG47 8th Oct 17, 9:03 PM
    • 610 Posts
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    AG47
    • #6
    • 8th Oct 17, 9:03 PM
    • #6
    • 8th Oct 17, 9:03 PM
    Look at your council website. There is usually an online portal that allows you to register and explains the banding system and whether or not you are eligible to apply.
    In my area there is one combined system for both council and housing association properties.

    ETA - getting on the list and getting a property are two different things. How long you wait will depend on your individual circumstances. If you're a single person with no vulnerability you will probably be waiting for years.
    Originally posted by elsien
    They say...


    There's very few council and housing association properties available and demand for housing far exceeds our supply. This means that:

    We can only help people with the most urgent housing need, so most people will not qualify
    Our first priority will be to help you stay in your current home
    Nothing has been fixed since 2008, it was just pushed into the future
    • AG47
    • By AG47 8th Oct 17, 9:05 PM
    • 610 Posts
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    AG47
    • #7
    • 8th Oct 17, 9:05 PM
    • #7
    • 8th Oct 17, 9:05 PM
    We just want to get on the waiting list, we have a disabled son
    Nothing has been fixed since 2008, it was just pushed into the future
    • HampshireH
    • By HampshireH 8th Oct 17, 9:06 PM
    • 120 Posts
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    HampshireH
    • #8
    • 8th Oct 17, 9:06 PM
    • #8
    • 8th Oct 17, 9:06 PM
    Their primary concern is to keep people in their current home. That's the same across the country. I don't understand your point?

    Do you have a current home and just would prefer social housing or do you have a housing need?
    • deannatrois
    • By deannatrois 8th Oct 17, 9:18 PM
    • 4,764 Posts
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    deannatrois
    • #9
    • 8th Oct 17, 9:18 PM
    • #9
    • 8th Oct 17, 9:18 PM
    'They' are correct.

    Please don't stop paying your rent if you are thinking of this (I have no idea if you are, just covering that base). It should be a first priority, before anything else. Rent arrears can be a reason a council finds you voluntarily homeless and then they can refuse to help. Unless there is good reason for the arrears.

    If benefits have stopped/been cut for some reason, again Citizen's advice can advise on that too.

    I have two disabled sons, had four years of hell with a private LL.., but would only suggest someone with absolutely no choice tries to get social housing. Even with my council who doesn't put people into B&B it meant at least two moves. One into emergency housing (in my area a single room hostel unless you are able to argue as I did that this would be totally unsuitable for my son's needs - but this required medical evidence as well) then you wait until you are high enough to be successful with bidding. This can take years. They may (depending on your council's policy) put you in a single room hostel for a few weeks then move you into a flat of some sort. So, like I said, at least two moves by the time you finally get social housing, if you ever do (see below).

    Because of the costs of emergency accommodation, the council may attempt to place you in an out of borough private rental (which they can do) which will then mean you are housed and not able to bid anymore (not in housing need). If your son has services provided by the local area you may be able to fight this but oh dear, its a stressful process. While I was in emergency housing, I had my Housing officer keep emailing me stating that the council was placing people in private rental and I would have no chance to refuse it until after I moved, and it turned out it was only a policy they were considering. But caused a LOT of stress.

    To help, get all your ducks in a row. With the NHS the way it is, I started applying for assessments or reassessments of my sons as soon as my LL suggested he wanted to sell (2 years before he actually did). I just about had the reports needed by the time we had to apply for housing. The fact that I had recent reports helped, sort of.
    Last edited by deannatrois; 09-10-2017 at 12:45 AM.
    • elsien
    • By elsien 8th Oct 17, 9:41 PM
    • 15,171 Posts
    • 38,020 Thanks
    elsien
    They say...


    There's very few council and housing association properties available and demand for housing far exceeds our supply. This means that:

    We can only help people with the most urgent housing need, so most people will not qualify
    Our first priority will be to help you stay in your current home
    Originally posted by AG47
    That shouldn't necessarily stop you going on the list; they're just warning you that it doesn't mean you'll any further.
    What happens in my area is that you register, you get allocated to the lowest band, then you submit any evidence that you might have to increase your banding. That may include evidence such as your sons disability, but if you are already adequately housed then that won't make much difference and you will stay with no priority.
    Your first post mentions defaulting on your rent. If you are considered to have made yourself intentionally homeless, then the council has no obligation to help you. If they do accept there is a duty to help, then you may well end up in a single room in emergency accommodation for months. Defaulting on rent does not bump you up the list and get you a house. Especially if you're in London or anywhere else with far more people than houses.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 8th Oct 17, 10:25 PM
    • 587 Posts
    • 218 Thanks
    sevenhills
    We just want to get on the waiting list, we have a disabled son
    Originally posted by AG47
    It still may take 2-6 years.

    • freeisgood
    • By freeisgood 9th Oct 17, 10:00 AM
    • 488 Posts
    • 744 Thanks
    freeisgood
    AG47 you just apply...and wait..(and wait!) Do not stop paying your rent thinking you will be given a council home...that is not how it works.
    • chelseablue
    • By chelseablue 9th Oct 17, 11:18 AM
    • 2,234 Posts
    • 2,753 Thanks
    chelseablue
    Every area is different but I know my local council states you have to have been living in the area continuously for 4 years before they'll let you join the list.

    We're in Berkshire and a friend of mine was on the list for 9 years before getting a 2 bedroom flat.
    Before that her, her partner and daughter lived with her parents
    Mortgage starting balance 26.02.16 £231,294
    Mortgage after Year 1 £225,078
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 9th Oct 17, 12:25 PM
    • 587 Posts
    • 218 Thanks
    sevenhills
    In Leeds the Letting criteria are 3/4 of the houses go to those with priority, and 1/4 goes to those that have been on the waiting list the longest.

    • WorriedFriend2017
    • By WorriedFriend2017 9th Oct 17, 12:41 PM
    • 27 Posts
    • 8 Thanks
    WorriedFriend2017
    What is there to lose? Helped a friend apply, single parent with 4 young children but in private rented. She was offered a new build house after 10 months.
    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 9th Oct 17, 3:45 PM
    • 8,367 Posts
    • 4,976 Thanks
    teddysmum
    What is there to lose? Helped a friend apply, single parent with 4 young children but in private rented. She was offered a new build house after 10 months.
    Originally posted by WorriedFriend2017


    It does very much depend on the area.

    Years ago, our council used to advertise for people to rent their properties yet recently, my son had to wait four years to upgrade a 3 bedroomed house, when they had two boys and a girl, the latter having to sleep in her parents' bedroom.


    If you watch the tv programmes about council housing or housing officers, you will see that in places like London ,they can have as many as 500 bids for one house and having a problem that puts you in a higher band doesn't help where there are hundreds in that band and some have even more severe problems.
    • theartfullodger
    • By theartfullodger 9th Oct 17, 4:00 PM
    • 8,975 Posts
    • 11,855 Thanks
    theartfullodger
    We just want to get on the waiting list, we have a disabled son
    Originally posted by AG47
    Different councils have different rules, both for who can go on the housing register & what priority different people get.

    Go to YOUR council's website, download the "housing allocation policy" (or similar) - e.g.
    http://www.slough.gov.uk/housing/housing-register.aspx

    - then work out what your status & priority will be and apply, often online via. e.g.
    http://www.slough.gov.uk/housing/how-to-apply.aspx

    STRONGLY recommend you keep a copy of what you submit & when council write to you telling you if..
    a) They have accepted your application &
    b) What priority/points/position they've given you, check council got it right against they published policy.

    (Everyone makes mistakes)

    Don't expect to get offered a property in less than several years, unless you are very lucky....

    Good luck, hope things work out.

    PS You may find neighbouring councils will also accept an application: But different councils, different rules: e.g. Slough you have to have lived there for the last 5 years, Wokingham anyone can apply.
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 9th Oct 17, 6:10 PM
    • 587 Posts
    • 218 Thanks
    sevenhills
    What is there to lose? Helped a friend apply, single parent with 4 young children but in private rented. She was offered a new build house after 10 months.
    Originally posted by WorriedFriend2017
    When I looked at the allocations list, there were some that took just a few months, but most less than 2 years.

    • AG47
    • By AG47 16th Oct 17, 6:32 PM
    • 610 Posts
    • 143 Thanks
    AG47
    Now they are saying unless you have an eviction letter they won't put you on the list
    Nothing has been fixed since 2008, it was just pushed into the future
    • HampshireH
    • By HampshireH 16th Oct 17, 6:53 PM
    • 120 Posts
    • 129 Thanks
    HampshireH
    As I said in a previous post they often assess on housing need.

    If you are housed they are likely to not seem you a priority. The eviction notice puts you at risk and therefore you become more of a priority to some (most) councils.

    This won't be the case if you put yourself in that situation and make yourself intentionally homeless.
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