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  • FIRST POST
    • KarlWalsh
    • By KarlWalsh 8th Oct 17, 6:07 PM
    • 19Posts
    • 1Thanks
    KarlWalsh
    What flooring tiles are these?
    • #1
    • 8th Oct 17, 6:07 PM
    What flooring tiles are these? 8th Oct 17 at 6:07 PM
    I'm looking to to put some wood flooring down in the hallway, and whilst poking about under the carpet that currently exists I noticed these odd, thin green tiles.

    The carpet gripper has been nailed into them, and they're quite brittle (near the site I was looking at they are cracked in places). I managed to pull up the attached piece with a screwdriver and very little effort.

    Now, after a google quick search I'm worried that they're actually asbestos tiles but I can't be sure and I'm not sure where I go from here.

    Any advice?





    Edit: Image links don't appear to be working, so here they are unformatted...

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/u6mscra913ejg4g/File%2008-10-2017%2C%2018%2002%2035.jpeg

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/1bttamtjhwew3p9/File%2008-10-2017%2C%2018%2003%2025.jpeg
    Last edited by KarlWalsh; 08-10-2017 at 6:13 PM. Reason: Trying to make dropbox images work
Page 1
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 8th Oct 17, 7:20 PM
    • 6,387 Posts
    • 5,159 Thanks
    Norman Castle
    • #2
    • 8th Oct 17, 7:20 PM
    • #2
    • 8th Oct 17, 7:20 PM
    Impossible to know without asbestos testing but they do look similar to mine which contain asbestos. If you can leave them in place and put the floor over them they should be fine but avoid creating a dust from them as this dust may contain asbestos fibres.

    https://inspectapedia.com/hazmat/Asbestos-Floor-Tile-Identification.php
    Last edited by Norman Castle; 08-10-2017 at 7:24 PM.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.
    • phill99
    • By phill99 8th Oct 17, 7:28 PM
    • 7,989 Posts
    • 7,225 Thanks
    phill99
    • #3
    • 8th Oct 17, 7:28 PM
    • #3
    • 8th Oct 17, 7:28 PM
    These are known as 'Thermo Plastic' Tiles. They were exceedingly common in house building from the 1960's right up to the early 1990s. Marley were the main producer.


    Some contain asbestos. However, it is in low concentrations and of the 'white' type which is the least harmful. If they are left in situ, they are fine.


    Send that piece off for testing to be certain.


    If it comes back as positive, your best bet and the most cost effective is to lay a self levelling screed over the top.
    Eat vegetables and fear no creditors, rather than eat duck and hide.
    • RichardD1970
    • By RichardD1970 8th Oct 17, 7:33 PM
    • 2,705 Posts
    • 3,958 Thanks
    RichardD1970
    • #4
    • 8th Oct 17, 7:33 PM
    • #4
    • 8th Oct 17, 7:33 PM
    Yep, look like all the floor tiles used in the council houses built around here in the 60's.

    Never heard of anyone being concerned about them and everyone just carpets or lays flooring over them.
    • KarlWalsh
    • By KarlWalsh 9th Oct 17, 8:24 AM
    • 19 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    KarlWalsh
    • #5
    • 9th Oct 17, 8:24 AM
    • #5
    • 9th Oct 17, 8:24 AM
    Thanks for the replies, I am going to send a piece off for testing.

    If it’s asbestos, levelling and a floating engineered floor is one option, otherwise I’ll pull them up, level and glue some hardwood down.

    Disposing of them might still be an option, depending on cost. They’re very easy to pull up. Has anyone tried that? Too risky?
    • Cats are great
    • By Cats are great 9th Oct 17, 10:33 AM
    • 51 Posts
    • 16 Thanks
    Cats are great
    • #6
    • 9th Oct 17, 10:33 AM
    • #6
    • 9th Oct 17, 10:33 AM
    Please wait for the testing to come back before you pull them up, I would use self levelling, the quick set works within a couple of hours....better to be safe
    • phill99
    • By phill99 9th Oct 17, 10:41 AM
    • 7,989 Posts
    • 7,225 Thanks
    phill99
    • #7
    • 9th Oct 17, 10:41 AM
    • #7
    • 9th Oct 17, 10:41 AM
    Thanks for the replies, I am going to send a piece off for testing.

    If itís asbestos, levelling and a floating engineered floor is one option, otherwise Iíll pull them up, level and glue some hardwood down.

    Disposing of them might still be an option, depending on cost. Theyíre very easy to pull up. Has anyone tried that? Too risky?
    Originally posted by KarlWalsh
    NO!
    Don't pull the up.


    Asbestos is fine until it is disturbed. These tiles shatter into thousands of tiny pieces and that's when the potential for harm occurs.


    Do nothing (which is what 99.9% of homeowners do) or put a self levelling compound over the top.
    Eat vegetables and fear no creditors, rather than eat duck and hide.
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