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  • FIRST POST
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 8th Oct 17, 5:47 PM
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    glasgowdan
    Anyone got an in ground trampoline?
    • #1
    • 8th Oct 17, 5:47 PM
    Anyone got an in ground trampoline? 8th Oct 17 at 5:47 PM
    I'm planning to get a 10ft trampoline and dig it into the garden. I am drawn to the Rebo range, as they seem to have a higher weight limit than most of the others (120kg) at around the £200 price range. I have no problem installing it myself. Even though the garden is flat and a bit damp, I am going to dig a much deeper hole with a soakaway, get the skip in and do it over 2 days.

    Has anyone got a brand they could recommend or any other comments about their own experience?
Page 1
    • TheCyclingProgrammer
    • By TheCyclingProgrammer 8th Oct 17, 9:54 PM
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    TheCyclingProgrammer
    • #2
    • 8th Oct 17, 9:54 PM
    • #2
    • 8th Oct 17, 9:54 PM
    Just had one fitted as part of or garden landscaping project.

    We got ours from Capital Play but be warned: they aren’t cheap. Our 8ft cost £625. It has a professional grade mat and vented pads and the frame has an integral retaining wall so only requires an inner and outer hole to be dug.

    It had a 115KG weight limit, 10 year guarantee on the frame, 5 year on the jump mat and 2 years on the pads.

    In comparison the Rebo simply has a 12 month guarantee. Do they sell spares and replacement parts? It’s not clear whether it has any form of retaining wall - if not you’ll need one constructed which will add to the installation cost.

    Make sure you get one with vented pads for a better jump and no pad slap noise.

    We didn’t bother with any drainage on ours. We have a clay layer but at the depth we dig to the soil was fairly sandy and seemed to drain just fine. I we ever have a problem it’s easy enough to remove the mat and add a small sump/french drain. We also lined our hole with landscaping fabric.
    • TheCyclingProgrammer
    • By TheCyclingProgrammer 8th Oct 17, 9:57 PM
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    TheCyclingProgrammer
    • #3
    • 8th Oct 17, 9:57 PM
    • #3
    • 8th Oct 17, 9:57 PM
    Here’s a picture of or completed install. Landscaping is mostly finished but it’s awaiting planting around the trampoline (mostly a mixture of perennial grasses) which will help soften it and blend it into the garden.

    https://postimg.org/image/5498jmyl3v/
    • somethingcorporate
    • By somethingcorporate 9th Oct 17, 12:23 AM
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    somethingcorporate
    • #4
    • 9th Oct 17, 12:23 AM
    • #4
    • 9th Oct 17, 12:23 AM
    Our neighbours had one in the last house. The hole was always full of water and it didn't smell great.
    Thinking critically since 1996....
    • tonyh66
    • By tonyh66 9th Oct 17, 8:48 AM
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    tonyh66
    • #5
    • 9th Oct 17, 8:48 AM
    • #5
    • 9th Oct 17, 8:48 AM
    I have to ask the question Why?
    • TheCyclingProgrammer
    • By TheCyclingProgrammer 9th Oct 17, 9:08 AM
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    TheCyclingProgrammer
    • #6
    • 9th Oct 17, 9:08 AM
    • #6
    • 9th Oct 17, 9:08 AM
    In ground trampolines are safer and much less of an eyesore IMO. And because they’re fun.
    • DaftyDuck
    • By DaftyDuck 9th Oct 17, 9:29 AM
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    DaftyDuck
    • #7
    • 9th Oct 17, 9:29 AM
    • #7
    • 9th Oct 17, 9:29 AM
    A neighbour has one, no idea of the make, but great fun for their kids and occasional adult. It is unobtrusive, and looks safer.

    Couple of problems... Hole does fill with water. Cats visit the hole as a litter tray area. Small kids hide there.

    That is not a good combination. I suspect all could be avoided with a good tarpaulin, well pegged down.
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 9th Oct 17, 9:51 AM
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    glasgowdan
    • #8
    • 9th Oct 17, 9:51 AM
    • #8
    • 9th Oct 17, 9:51 AM
    There shouldn't be space for kids and cats to get down there!
    • TheCyclingProgrammer
    • By TheCyclingProgrammer 9th Oct 17, 9:55 AM
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    TheCyclingProgrammer
    • #9
    • 9th Oct 17, 9:55 AM
    • #9
    • 9th Oct 17, 9:55 AM
    No, there shouldn’t unless it’s been built very badly!
    • DaftyDuck
    • By DaftyDuck 9th Oct 17, 11:29 AM
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    DaftyDuck
    There's certainly enough space for a six(ish) and nine(ish) to get through. With difficulty, I guess, but that's kids for you. Cats can certainly get into his, and have a hell of a surprise when the kids arrive.

    As to being badly built - well, he is chief surveyor for the county hospitals, so I suppose he should know...

    It's the only ground level one I've ever met (I don't have kids), so nothing to judge it by. Works, though.
    • Grenage
    • By Grenage 9th Oct 17, 11:42 AM
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    Grenage
    Water always finds a way, but whether it's a problem will be down to the soil type and drainage.

    I think the ground-level trampolines look a lot, lot better than the hideous 20-foot monstrosities. If I see one I immediately assume I'm in a council estate; they're usually crammed into a tiny garden, to make it look even more ridiculous.
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 9th Oct 17, 12:37 PM
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    andrewf75
    Water always finds a way, but whether it's a problem will be down to the soil type and drainage.

    I think the ground-level trampolines look a lot, lot better than the hideous 20-foot monstrosities. If I see one I immediately assume I'm in a council estate; they're usually crammed into a tiny garden, to make it look even more ridiculous.
    Originally posted by Grenage
    20 foot is about 7 metres, I've never seen one that big
    • Warwick Hunt
    • By Warwick Hunt 9th Oct 17, 12:55 PM
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    Warwick Hunt
    20 foot is about 7 metres, I've never seen one that big
    Originally posted by andrewf75
    It's a lot nearer to 6 but still not seen one that size.
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 9th Oct 17, 2:19 PM
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    glasgowdan
    I get the jist of what grenage is saying and totally agree!
    • Grenage
    • By Grenage 9th Oct 17, 2:37 PM
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    Grenage
    Sorry, yes; I was not being literal! Still, they can't be that far off 15-20 foot.
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