Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • wymondham
    • By wymondham 8th Oct 17, 3:55 PM
    • 4,816Posts
    • 8,114Thanks
    wymondham
    Roof survey
    • #1
    • 8th Oct 17, 3:55 PM
    Roof survey 8th Oct 17 at 3:55 PM
    Hi All

    We live in a 1970's built semi. The roof has been patched on occasions and I'm aware the linings a bit shoddy in places. I'm wondering if we are near the time to replace it or renovate etc? Is 45 years old ok for a pitched tile roof or is this the life expectancy of it?

    Are we looking at big bucks to replace?
Page 1
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 8th Oct 17, 4:07 PM
    • 1,307 Posts
    • 1,861 Thanks
    FreeBear
    • #2
    • 8th Oct 17, 4:07 PM
    • #2
    • 8th Oct 17, 4:07 PM
    My tiled roof is some 90 years old - To the best of my knowledge, never been stripped. It has had the occasional tile replaced after a real strong gale, and that is it.
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • Tom99
    • By Tom99 8th Oct 17, 4:47 PM
    • 281 Posts
    • 138 Thanks
    Tom99
    • #3
    • 8th Oct 17, 4:47 PM
    • #3
    • 8th Oct 17, 4:47 PM
    Being watertight is what matters. If it leaks then repair it, if not leave it alone.
    • Grenage
    • By Grenage 8th Oct 17, 6:17 PM
    • 1,259 Posts
    • 1,200 Thanks
    Grenage
    • #4
    • 8th Oct 17, 6:17 PM
    • #4
    • 8th Oct 17, 6:17 PM
    As above; roofs don't need refreshing unless they aren't keeping the water out. 45 years is nothing.
    • Ectophile
    • By Ectophile 8th Oct 17, 8:34 PM
    • 2,742 Posts
    • 1,683 Thanks
    Ectophile
    • #5
    • 8th Oct 17, 8:34 PM
    • #5
    • 8th Oct 17, 8:34 PM
    I had my 1968 roof stripped and re-laid a couple of years back. Expect a price around £2000-3000 for a renovation, not including the cost of the scaffolding.

    It started out a simple job of replacing tatty fascias with PVC, but the builders had skimped on materials, the damp had got in, and the timbers were rotting at the ends.
    If it sticks, force it.
    If it breaks, well it wasn't working right anyway.
    • wymondham
    • By wymondham 9th Oct 17, 8:34 AM
    • 4,816 Posts
    • 8,114 Thanks
    wymondham
    • #6
    • 9th Oct 17, 8:34 AM
    • #6
    • 9th Oct 17, 8:34 AM
    So, probably best I do a good survey from within my attic to check all appears dry... if its looks ok then leave..? thanks for replies
    • kinger101
    • By kinger101 10th Oct 17, 11:14 PM
    • 3,887 Posts
    • 5,305 Thanks
    kinger101
    • #7
    • 10th Oct 17, 11:14 PM
    • #7
    • 10th Oct 17, 11:14 PM
    The underfelt is there to provide a secondary protection only, in the event the tiles themselves leak. Some roofs don't even have this layer.

    Last time I had a problem with the roof, I asked three roofers to look at my roof. I got three entirely different answers as to what needed doing. None of them could be bother to look at the roof from inside the property and spot the bleeding obvious reason for the leak. Some of them will quote you for unnecessary work because they need a big job. Some of them will quote you for pointless work because they're bodgers (buttering-up ridge tiles).

    I contracted a fourth who was willing to just do as they were told.

    Good luck.
    Last edited by kinger101; 10-10-2017 at 11:17 PM.
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 11th Oct 17, 10:53 AM
    • 592 Posts
    • 220 Thanks
    sevenhills
    • #8
    • 11th Oct 17, 10:53 AM
    • #8
    • 11th Oct 17, 10:53 AM
    I live on a council estate built in the 60s, the council are replacing some of the tiles, but mine is still intact. They seem to replace recover a dozen roofs and then come back and recover some more.
    I have the same thoughts, should I renew, and should I get it checked.

    • chappers
    • By chappers 11th Oct 17, 3:18 PM
    • 2,735 Posts
    • 1,547 Thanks
    chappers
    • #9
    • 11th Oct 17, 3:18 PM
    • #9
    • 11th Oct 17, 3:18 PM
    what tiles/slates are on there stick up a picture would help.
    45 years old would ordinarily be fine for most roof coverings.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

12Posts Today

4,285Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • RT @LordsEconCom: On Tuesday Martin Lewis, Hannah Morrish & Shakira Martin gave evidence to the Cttee. Read the full transcript here: https?

  • Ta ta for now. Half term's starting, so I'm exchanging my MoneySavingExpert hat for one that says Daddy in big letters. See you in a week.

  • RT @thismorning: Can @MartinSLewis' deals save YOU cash? ???? https://t.co/igbHCwzeiN

  • Follow Martin