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  • FIRST POST
    • ScarletMarble
    • By ScarletMarble 8th Oct 17, 12:22 PM
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    ScarletMarble
    Health is making me want to change jobs
    • #1
    • 8th Oct 17, 12:22 PM
    Health is making me want to change jobs 8th Oct 17 at 12:22 PM
    I am 36 and worked at my present employer, full time, for 9 years now. Past few months, my lower leg has been playing up, 2 doctors thought it was a stress fracture. I was off sick for 4 weeks in total around May/June as the pain was unbearable and found it difficult to be on my feet most of the day. My job involves being on my feet. No such thing as light duties - well on my hours. Have colleagues that work 12 hours a week just on the tills. I cannot take a cut of hours and pay as live on my own, have a mortgage to pay etc.

    The pain never fully went away. Had some pain free days. Some days the pain would only flair up later in the day.

    Now, last week, the pain has now moved down 4-5 inches from the middle of my lower leg to just above my ankle. Same muscles, bone. Not been to the doctors yet for this new pain, which I believe is the same thing.

    I am starting to think that my job isn't doing much for my health. The floors are tiled for a start. I have done office based work before I worked for my current employer - call centre and admin type work. I do use computers outside work. I am worried that no employer will employ me, based on the number of years away office work Then the amount of time off sick I had this year 4 weeks with my leg and 2.5 weeks for an eye procedure. Needed that amount of time off because the procedure temporary affected my tolerance to strip lighting - the lights they use at work. Apart from that, I am generally in good health - had gallbladder and later, the bile duct removed.

    If when I do contact potential employers or agencies and they ask why do I want to change jobs, would it spell disaster if I use my work is affecting my health card? I also find the work, at times, uninspiring.

    What jobs should I look for? I had a quick look at some jobs a few months ago and I probably have to drive or travel to work on the bus for future work as my current work is 10 mins walk away. No other employers down here apart from retail and care homes. I would be worse off as I work 39 hours a week and most full time jobs are 35 hours.
Page 1
    • iammumtoone
    • By iammumtoone 8th Oct 17, 12:29 PM
    • 5,364 Posts
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    iammumtoone
    • #2
    • 8th Oct 17, 12:29 PM
    • #2
    • 8th Oct 17, 12:29 PM
    Admin work tends to be better paid then shop, maybe not at first as you will have to start entry level but there will be more opportunities to work up to a higher wage.

    I would apply for all the admin jobs you can find and keep at it.

    In the meantime can you ask your current employer for more time on the tills? Would your doctor be able to write a letter advising this would be better for you?

    Good Luck
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 8th Oct 17, 12:36 PM
    • 2,031 Posts
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    Red-Squirrel
    • #3
    • 8th Oct 17, 12:36 PM
    • #3
    • 8th Oct 17, 12:36 PM
    Are there no admin roles within your current employers organisation?

    You've been there a long time, so you have rights, if your condition amounts to a disability they have to make 'reasonable adjustments' for you. I'd definitely go back to your GP and discuss what the long term outlook is for your leg pain.
    • IAmWales
    • By IAmWales 8th Oct 17, 12:52 PM
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    IAmWales
    • #4
    • 8th Oct 17, 12:52 PM
    • #4
    • 8th Oct 17, 12:52 PM
    Are there no admin roles within your current employers organisation?

    You've been there a long time, so you have rights, if your condition amounts to a disability they have to make 'reasonable adjustments' for you. I'd definitely go back to your GP and discuss what the long term outlook is for your leg pain.
    Originally posted by Red-Squirrel
    It's unlikely what the OP describes would currently amount to a disability, either in terms of severity or duration. It's certainly worth asking for a change of roles though.

    OP you've identified the other types of work that might be suitable. You tell prospective employers you're looking for a change in environment, you want something that may offer progression. You don't criticise your former employer.

    If a job is 35 hours full time then you ask for overtime when available or you get a second job. Most of us have to travel to work, no big deal, you just take into account the cost of travel when calculating if you can afford to take the job.
    • ScarletMarble
    • By ScarletMarble 8th Oct 17, 1:30 PM
    • 7,415 Posts
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    ScarletMarble
    • #5
    • 8th Oct 17, 1:30 PM
    • #5
    • 8th Oct 17, 1:30 PM
    Are there no admin roles within your current employers organisation?

    You've been there a long time, so you have rights, if your condition amounts to a disability they have to make 'reasonable adjustments' for you. I'd definitely go back to your GP and discuss what the long term outlook is for your leg pain.
    Originally posted by Red-Squirrel
    Admin work at my shop is just as much time on feet as me. They dress new lines on shelves, move shelves, change the seasonal sections etc. They also work part time.
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 8th Oct 17, 2:39 PM
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    sangie595
    • #6
    • 8th Oct 17, 2:39 PM
    • #6
    • 8th Oct 17, 2:39 PM
    Without actually telling a lie, I would recommend staying well away from mentioning sickness or health problems. An undiagnosed leg pain isn't going to amount to a disability at this stage; and even if it did, that doesn't mean that employers will be sanguine about employing someone who may be ill.

    However, do get it checked out, because there are a number of possible conditions that will definitely get worse if it isn't treated - been there and currently have the T-shirt on order! And medical advice may differ from what you think is the cause or what makes it worse. You need to know so that you can look for the right job, as you don't want to start something and then discover you can't do the job.
    • ScarletMarble
    • By ScarletMarble 23rd Oct 17, 8:10 AM
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    ScarletMarble
    • #7
    • 23rd Oct 17, 8:10 AM
    • #7
    • 23rd Oct 17, 8:10 AM
    Hi there

    I'm back on the sick as the pain is getting unbearable, it has got worse past couple of days and I am just very worried about work. It's now on my ankle. Still no idea what it is, but the pain is going down the same line as the tibialis anterior tendon.

    Seeing the podiatrist this Thursday, got physio starting 21st Nov - the first date available.

    Now I am worried that when I am job hunting and attend interviews etc, I will be walking with a limp. It would be natural for the interviewer to mention about the limping. It would be rude not to say anything and lying would be bad. Will potential employers want to employ someone with a dicky leg when the job is office type work? If, I am required surgery, I would only get SSP. At the moment, at work, I only have 2 or 3 weeks left of sick pay as colleagues with 15 years plus service, get the full 26 weeks pay.

    I do have policies in place for paying towards my mortgage and other bills, but only will pay out with confirmed diagnosis of the lower leg and ankle. It will not pay out with just saying I have got pain in my lower leg and ankle and can't stand up much. My parents, are in a position to help me out financially if it is really needed.

    Thanks for your advice
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 23rd Oct 17, 12:05 PM
    • 4,188 Posts
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    sangie595
    • #8
    • 23rd Oct 17, 12:05 PM
    • #8
    • 23rd Oct 17, 12:05 PM
    Hi there

    I'm back on the sick as the pain is getting unbearable, it has got worse past couple of days and I am just very worried about work. It's now on my ankle. Still no idea what it is, but the pain is going down the same line as the tibialis anterior tendon.

    Seeing the podiatrist this Thursday, got physio starting 21st Nov - the first date available.

    Now I am worried that when I am job hunting and attend interviews etc, I will be walking with a limp. It would be natural for the interviewer to mention about the limping. It would be rude not to say anything and lying would be bad. Will potential employers want to employ someone with a dicky leg when the job is office type work? If, I am required surgery, I would only get SSP. At the moment, at work, I only have 2 or 3 weeks left of sick pay as colleagues with 15 years plus service, get the full 26 weeks pay.

    I do have policies in place for paying towards my mortgage and other bills, but only will pay out with confirmed diagnosis of the lower leg and ankle. It will not pay out with just saying I have got pain in my lower leg and ankle and can't stand up much. My parents, are in a position to help me out financially if it is really needed.

    Thanks for your advice
    Originally posted by ScarletMarble

    What is rude about not mentioning a limp? Quite the contrary - it's not anyone else's business. I rarely go around saying "Hi, my name is Angie and I have serious arthritis and did I mention my ankle needs rebuilding?" All anyone cares is whether I do my job or not. And if you are looking for jobs that you can do, that is all they need to know.


    Stop prevaricating - go to the doctor and get that ankle looked at by an expert. For very different reasons (wrong diagnosis, but actually nobodies fault as it made sense at the time) I had exactly this type of pain for about two years on and off, getting gradually worse. After the pressure on the tibia resulted in it breaking - six weeks in a cast - they realised that the actual problem had been something else entirely, and I am now waiting for a major surgery which will take 3 1/2 hours, at least 12 weeks non weight bearing and might improve it. Or might make it worse. And there is nothing at all that I can do about it now. If I'd known two years ago, they might have saved it.


    Podiatrists and physiotherapists are great - they are also not experts in the diagnosis of these conditions. At the time this all happened I was regularly seeing a physiotherapist - who also didn't realise what the problem was. Insist on a referral to a specialist - make sure that you actually know what is happening and don't be fobbed off with anything less. Or you might end up in my shoes. Which I wouldn't recommend to anyone.


    And people apply for roles all the time when they have underlying health conditions. There is nothing at all wrong with doing that. Whether you might need surgery or other treatment at some time is putting the cart before the horse.
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