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  • FIRST POST
    • Borealis
    • By Borealis 7th Oct 17, 9:09 PM
    • 2Posts
    • 0Thanks
    Borealis
    Starting a new job, cannot afford deposit/admin fees for flat rental
    • #1
    • 7th Oct 17, 9:09 PM
    Starting a new job, cannot afford deposit/admin fees for flat rental 7th Oct 17 at 9:09 PM
    Hi everyone,

    First time posting here in a long time, but I'm pretty desperate here.

    The short story is that I was studying for my master's degree and ended up in all kinds of problems, resulting in a downward spiral of stress, depression and anxiety. Among other things, I had a CCJ issued against me for unpaid tuition fees (which were unpaid because I was turned down for a career development loan, but university didn't really care about that and just wanted the money).

    I owe a substantial amount of money. I have my first repayment installment through Marston Group due on the 10th, and I also owe my dad some money.

    I was offered a fantastic job recently, which I have accepted. This is a huge deal for me as the past couple of years have been extremely difficult. I have been self-employed and living pretty much hand to mouth. I start this job in early November and need to find somewhere to live before the end of this month. Unfortunately, I cannot work out how I'm going to afford to move house. Every tenancy requires one month's rent as a deposit, and most also have hefty admin fees (usually around £200).

    I'm looking at having to spend roughly £900 just to get into a flat. I also need to eat and pay for fuel etc. I don't have this money. Nor do I have the money to pay my tuition fees or my dad. I'm already in my overdraft, and I have already borrowed money.

    Once I have a couple of paycheques come through I should be financially stable (I cannot wait). The job is well paid and gives me enough money for rent, debt repayments, general living costs and some left over for saving. However, I just cannot figure out to physically start my job. I'm terrified Marston will take my car (which I foolishly signed some form of some description giving them, I don't know, some kind of authority over it - I was really not in a good frame of mind at the time). If Marston take my car, which is essential given that I live in the countryside with poor public transport, I have no idea how I'd even physically move my stuff to my new job.

    I'm panicking. I should feel excited that I'm starting a new job (especially given that the past couple of years have been extremely hard), but I can feel myself descending back into a cycle of depression that I have worked hard to break.

    I used to be so good with money. Then I decided to go back to university and everything went wrong from there.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

    B
Page 1
    • G_M
    • By G_M 7th Oct 17, 9:17 PM
    • 42,305 Posts
    • 49,145 Thanks
    G_M
    • #2
    • 7th Oct 17, 9:17 PM
    • #2
    • 7th Oct 17, 9:17 PM
    You'll need to get a cheap house/flat-share untill your pay cheques start arriving.

    Is the job too far to commute from where you are, at least in the short term?
    • HampshireH
    • By HampshireH 7th Oct 17, 9:20 PM
    • 266 Posts
    • 272 Thanks
    HampshireH
    • #3
    • 7th Oct 17, 9:20 PM
    • #3
    • 7th Oct 17, 9:20 PM
    Could you not find a room on something like spareroom.com would be cheaper than a flat
    • Borealis
    • By Borealis 7th Oct 17, 9:37 PM
    • 2 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Borealis
    • #4
    • 7th Oct 17, 9:37 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Oct 17, 9:37 PM
    These are places on SpareRoom etc. The new job is four hour's drive away, so definitely too far. Another factor is the house I am currently living in is up for sale and the sale is agreed, so even if I wanted to stay a little bit longer, I can't.

    The cheapest houseshare I can find is £500/month. The majority are around £600/month. The job is in a rural area and there are not many housing options available, especially houseshares.

    That's still £500 (plus another £500 in repayments and another £150 in living expenses) that I need. I'm good for October. I have enough in cash to see me to the end of the month in terms of food and fuel (though I'm still not sure how to pay my debt repayment this month). I have no idea how I'm going to pay for November until I get my first month's paycheque through (which I'm assuming will be at the end of the month/beginning of December).

    I have been considering going to the cheapest campsite I can find and staying in my tent for a couple of months. I'm pretty well equipped for outdoor living and I'm a thoroughly unfussy person, but the prospect of living in my (very small) tent for two months as we're coming into winter (while also ensuring I'm well-rested and smart for work) isn't a pleasant one.

    Thank you for both your replies,

    B
    • HampshireH
    • By HampshireH 7th Oct 17, 10:19 PM
    • 266 Posts
    • 272 Thanks
    HampshireH
    • #5
    • 7th Oct 17, 10:19 PM
    • #5
    • 7th Oct 17, 10:19 PM
    Don't forget you will presumably be getting your deposit back on your current place
    • HampshireH
    • By HampshireH 7th Oct 17, 10:21 PM
    • 266 Posts
    • 272 Thanks
    HampshireH
    • #6
    • 7th Oct 17, 10:21 PM
    • #6
    • 7th Oct 17, 10:21 PM
    Also make use of Foodbanks if struggling
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 7th Oct 17, 10:36 PM
    • 2,016 Posts
    • 5,534 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    • #7
    • 7th Oct 17, 10:36 PM
    • #7
    • 7th Oct 17, 10:36 PM
    Have you spoken to your new employer and asked if they can help with an advance or a loan for moving costs?
    • gettingtheresometime
    • By gettingtheresometime 7th Oct 17, 11:14 PM
    • 3,133 Posts
    • 7,315 Thanks
    gettingtheresometime
    • #8
    • 7th Oct 17, 11:14 PM
    • #8
    • 7th Oct 17, 11:14 PM
    What about seeing if a b&b will do you a deal?
    Lloyds OD / Natwest OD / PO CC / Wescott / Argos Card cleared thanks to the 1 debt v 100 day challenge


    Next on the list - JD Williams
    • Pixie5740
    • By Pixie5740 8th Oct 17, 8:41 AM
    • 11,202 Posts
    • 15,655 Thanks
    Pixie5740
    • #9
    • 8th Oct 17, 8:41 AM
    • #9
    • 8th Oct 17, 8:41 AM
    I think you would be better off posting on the Debt Free Wannabe board for advice. There are rules about what bailiffs are allowed to take when recovering debts. For example, if a car (low value) is necessary to get to work then bailiffs might not be able to take it. There is also a huge difference between debt collectors and bailiffs, yet some debt collectors try to pass themselves off as bailiffs.

    If you can't pay the university tuition fees or your dad then you can't pay them. If you haven't already you should probably contact one of the debt charities such as National Debtline for advice and perhaps consider opening up a basic current account with a bank or building society that you do not currently owe money to and have your new salary paid into it.
    Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen pounds nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds nought and six, result misery.
    • Pixie5740
    • By Pixie5740 8th Oct 17, 8:44 AM
    • 11,202 Posts
    • 15,655 Thanks
    Pixie5740
    These are places on SpareRoom etc. The new job is four hour's drive away, so definitely too far. Another factor is the house I am currently living in is up for sale and the sale is agreed, so even if I wanted to stay a little bit longer, I can't.

    Originally posted by Borealis
    That's not necessarily true. If you are a tenant then your tenancy doesn't end just because the property is sold. If your landlord is keen to avoid a lengthy eviction process (s)he might be amenable to returning your deposit early and possibly even offering you some money to sweeten the deal.

    However, the above advice does not apply if you are a lodger i.e. living with your landlord.
    Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen pounds nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds nought and six, result misery.
    • csgohan4
    • By csgohan4 8th Oct 17, 8:57 AM
    • 4,018 Posts
    • 2,498 Thanks
    csgohan4
    That's not necessarily true. If you are a tenant then your tenancy doesn't end just because the property is sold. If your landlord is keen to avoid a lengthy eviction process (s)he might be amenable to returning your deposit early and possibly even offering you some money to sweeten the deal.

    However, the above advice does not apply if you are a lodger i.e. living with your landlord.
    Originally posted by Pixie5740


    Careful about not going when the contract ends, firstly on moral grounds and secondly on providing references for your next rental.


    Sure you can take the LL for a ride and stay for months while the eviction process plays out, don't expect your LL to refund your deposit in a hurray and they may take you to court for arrears if you don't pay the rent
    "It is prudent when shopping for something important, not to limit yourself to Pound land"
    • Pixie5740
    • By Pixie5740 8th Oct 17, 9:02 AM
    • 11,202 Posts
    • 15,655 Thanks
    Pixie5740
    Careful about not going when the contract ends, firstly on moral grounds and secondly on providing references for your next rental.


    Sure you can take the LL for a ride and stay for months while the eviction process plays out, don't expect your LL to refund your deposit in a hurray and they may take you to court for arrears if you don't pay the rent
    Originally posted by csgohan4
    Moral grounds my !!!!. Them's the rules and if people don't like them then they shouldn't become landlords in the first place.

    What benefit would it be for a landlord to give a tenant with a perfectly legal tenancy a bad reference? It would just drag the eviction process on longer because the tenant would have nowhere to move to. Furthermore, the OP doesn't currently have a pot to !!!! in and is already the proud owner of a CCJ so what's the worst the landlord could actually do?

    Edit: What contract has ended? The OP just said the property is being sold he never mentioned anything about his contract ending.
    Last edited by Pixie5740; 08-10-2017 at 9:06 AM.
    Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen pounds nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds nought and six, result misery.
    • tlc678910
    • By tlc678910 8th Oct 17, 9:55 AM
    • 490 Posts
    • 877 Thanks
    tlc678910
    You could ask the company you are going to work for if they have a notice board where you could ask to rent a room from a colleague short term while you settle in and find something more permanent. They might also be able to send an email to all staff asking the same.

    If anyone offers explain this is your first job and ask if you could pay the first months rent in arrears on pay day and the second month upfront on the same day. They may have a bit of faith in you because you wouldn't want to develop bad feeling at work.

    Can you hide your car somewhere - another street, any friends with a rear drive or garage? Rather than leaving it parked at yours.

    Good luck
    • csgohan4
    • By csgohan4 8th Oct 17, 10:24 AM
    • 4,018 Posts
    • 2,498 Thanks
    csgohan4
    Moral grounds my !!!!. Them's the rules and if people don't like them then they shouldn't become landlords in the first place.

    What benefit would it be for a landlord to give a tenant with a perfectly legal tenancy a bad reference? It would just drag the eviction process on longer because the tenant would have nowhere to move to. Furthermore, the OP doesn't currently have a pot to !!!! in and is already the proud owner of a CCJ so what's the worst the landlord could actually do?

    Edit: What contract has ended? The OP just said the property is being sold he never mentioned anything about his contract ending.
    Originally posted by Pixie5740
    there are good tenants and there are tenants who take other people for a ride, Rules are rules yes I agree, you can go through the court process and not pay rent.


    The LL is not always made of a bottomless pit of cash, they have mortgages and bills to pay.


    Just like Right to buy, morally wrong but legal yes. Doesn't mean we should accept it.


    If the OP wants to drag things out, go ahead, but like most things in life, there are consequences for what you do.


    BTW people don't become LL to be a charity and taken advantaged of. If a tenant doesn't pay they have to evict if the tenant doesn't sort the rent out in a timely manner. You seem to think a LL can absorb these costs no problem. I hope if you have a rental nothing bad happens to you because it's real


    The other issue is, if the OP is in so much debt, will they pass a credit check most LA do now a days? More money to pee down the drain for fees. Something to think about. OP you need to hit that debt, go on the debt free wannabee forum
    Last edited by csgohan4; 08-10-2017 at 10:29 AM.
    "It is prudent when shopping for something important, not to limit yourself to Pound land"
    • Pixie5740
    • By Pixie5740 8th Oct 17, 10:38 AM
    • 11,202 Posts
    • 15,655 Thanks
    Pixie5740
    Who said anything about not paying the rent?

    There are risks when letting property just as there are risks with any other type of investment. Itís down to people to assess those risks and if they donít and they leave themselves financially exposed thatís their hard cheese.
    Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen pounds nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds nought and six, result misery.
    • 00ec25
    • By 00ec25 8th Oct 17, 10:42 AM
    • 5,561 Posts
    • 4,964 Thanks
    00ec25
    you say that 2 months of pay will set you back up financially so live out of your car for 2 months.

    I assume you could leave your stuff at your parents, take a suitcase full of one week's clothing and a sleeping bag and then go home at the weekend for a changeover of clothing.

    Sleep in the car for 2 months given you say the job is in a rural location anyway, been there, done that.
    Last edited by 00ec25; 08-10-2017 at 10:45 AM.
    • cjdavies
    • By cjdavies 8th Oct 17, 10:48 AM
    • 2,848 Posts
    • 2,882 Thanks
    cjdavies
    Moral grounds my !!!!. Them's the rules and if people don't like them then they shouldn't become landlords in the first place.
    Originally posted by Pixie5740
    Also sounds like the landlord wants their cake and eat it, sell while tenent is living there not to have voids.

    They should advertise for sale after tenent has left.
    • Rosieandjim
    • By Rosieandjim 8th Oct 17, 1:38 PM
    • 85 Posts
    • 102 Thanks
    Rosieandjim
    Go to your bank and talk with them about the situation they may surprise you and allow you a loan until you get on your feet


    Go to the area you are working ask at the local pub if they have a room for a few weeks. Is there a youth hostel nearby a B/B etc?


    Go onto facebook and see if there is someone in the area who would give you a bed for a few weeks you never know until you ask


    I know if I had the room I would help someone in your position to get on their feet. Good luck
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