Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • Nadiya
    • By Nadiya 7th Oct 17, 3:44 PM
    • 4Posts
    • 0Thanks
    Nadiya
    More driving lessons
    • #1
    • 7th Oct 17, 3:44 PM
    More driving lessons 7th Oct 17 at 3:44 PM
    Hi

    I need bit of advice.
    I have been taking driving lessons from an independent instructor. She charges £17 an hour lesson. When i started she said i would need around 40 lessons to get to the test standard. I have my test booked now in december. I did a crash course with her and completed 40 hrs of lessons.(6 to 8 hrs every week). I told her i would like to reduce my lessons now, because if i go with the same hours it would be around 70 to 80 lessons with her by the end of November. She straightaway said i am not ready and will have to take another 20 lessons more or else she will not give me her car for the test. I am bit confused now. Should i take second opinion with another instructor because she took my mock test today and i had a few minors around 6 may be. I am worried because if i take more 20 lessons and if she still isn't happy, then i would be left with no car for the test
    I am also practicing in my husbands car.

    Thx
    Nadiya
Page 1
    • Robisere
    • By Robisere 7th Oct 17, 4:08 PM
    • 1,789 Posts
    • 2,572 Thanks
    Robisere
    • #2
    • 7th Oct 17, 4:08 PM
    • #2
    • 7th Oct 17, 4:08 PM
    If I read that correctly, you will be paying £680 in total for the 40 hours. Long time since I passed my test (>50 years) but that does seem excessive, can anyone else currently taking lessons, or having recently taken them, advise this lady?

    You have been practicing in your husband's car. Would you be happy to take a test in that car? It's a question of how much practice you have had in it, and thus how experienced you are at driving it. You come across as quite confident and confidence is half the battle when taking the test. "A few minors" does not sound bad, but driving is all about experience on the road. With experience and practice, brain and muscle memory begin to take your driving into instinct. The fact that you have been driving two different cars is also a good thing. Are you driving in town, city, country or mixed?
    There may be more than one way to skin a cat.
    But the result is always inedible.

    • Herringbone
    • By Herringbone 7th Oct 17, 4:17 PM
    • 14 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    Herringbone
    • #3
    • 7th Oct 17, 4:17 PM
    • #3
    • 7th Oct 17, 4:17 PM
    I'm another whose experience isn't up to date (passed my test in the 90s), but that sounds like an enormous number of lessons.

    Obviously, what's needed depends on the individual but the idea of needing 70 to 80 lessons on top of experience driving your husband's car seems incredible. I think I had 12 lessons plus driving my dad's car.

    As long as the instructor has taught you well and you understand enough to repeat on your own, then driving your husband's car can be really useful - I would put far more of my ability to pass the test down to the time spent with my Dad than the lessons I had. It helped that my Dad was quite calm and wasn't constantly giving instruction or criticism though!

    Good luck
    • glentoran99
    • By glentoran99 7th Oct 17, 4:17 PM
    • 4,724 Posts
    • 3,736 Thanks
    glentoran99
    • #4
    • 7th Oct 17, 4:17 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Oct 17, 4:17 PM
    Hi

    I need bit of advice.
    I have been taking driving lessons from an independent instructor. She charges £17 an hour lesson. When i started she said i would need around 40 lessons to get to the test standard. I have my test booked now in december. I did a crash course with her and completed 40 hrs of lessons.(6 to 8 hrs every week). I told her i would like to reduce my lessons now, because if i go with the same hours it would be around 70 to 80 lessons with her by the end of November. She straightaway said i am not ready and will have to take another 20 lessons more or else she will not give me her car for the test. I am bit confused now. Should i take second opinion with another instructor because she took my mock test today and i had a few minors around 6 may be. I am worried because if i take more 20 lessons and if she still isn't happy, then i would be left with no car for the test
    I am also practicing in my husbands car.

    Thx
    Nadiya
    Originally posted by Nadiya

    theres your answer
    • footyguy
    • By footyguy 7th Oct 17, 4:28 PM
    • 3,690 Posts
    • 1,470 Thanks
    footyguy
    • #5
    • 7th Oct 17, 4:28 PM
    • #5
    • 7th Oct 17, 4:28 PM
    Hi

    I need bit of advice.
    I have been taking driving lessons from an independent instructor. She charges £17 an hour lesson. When i started she said i would need around 40 lessons to get to the test standard. I have my test booked now in december. I did a crash course with her and completed 40 hrs of lessons.(6 to 8 hrs every week). I told her i would like to reduce my lessons now, because if i go with the same hours it would be around 70 to 80 lessons with her by the end of November. She straightaway said i am not ready and will have to take another 20 lessons more or else she will not give me her car for the test. I am bit confused now. Should i take second opinion with another instructor because she took my mock test today and i had a few minors around 6 may be. I am worried because if i take more 20 lessons and if she still isn't happy, then i would be left with no car for the test
    I am also practicing in my husbands car.

    Thx
    Nadiya
    Originally posted by Nadiya
    If you have a test booked, I'm not sure why any driving instructor would not allow you (as a current customer) to use their car if that is what you want to do.

    I'm not sure if it's changed, but when I took my test, it was a guaranteed 2 hours pay i.e. 1 hour to get a bit of last minute tuition and more importantly time to drive yourself to the test centre in plenty of time, and then another hour for the test (whilst the instructor had a good chin wag with the other instructors at the test centre) and return you home (I passed, so was told I couldn't even drive myself home)

    Anyway, if the current driving school refuses, then I suggest you get a new instructor asap. I am sure it won't be difficult to find someone will to take 2 hours tuition fee off you for very little work. Driving shool work is very competitive, with supply more than exceeding demand.

    Or you can take the test in any appropriate vehicle, but ensure it is correctly insured, displays the legally required L plates, etc. You will also need an appropiately authorised driver to supervise you if you want to drive youself to the test centre (and on return, should you fail) - but not for the test itself.

    But if you are not ready, you are not ready. Taking a test when you are not ready may well result a failure. Driving tests are not cheap (even without the driving school cost) and there are restrictions on how soon you can re-apply following a test failure.

    Do follow the advice of your driving instructor if possible. However, if you have lost faith in the existing instructor in any way, then perhaps it is indeed time to move on
    Last edited by footyguy; 07-10-2017 at 4:34 PM.
    • Car 54
    • By Car 54 7th Oct 17, 4:46 PM
    • 2,305 Posts
    • 1,484 Thanks
    Car 54
    • #6
    • 7th Oct 17, 4:46 PM
    • #6
    • 7th Oct 17, 4:46 PM
    First, 70 to 80 hours is not unusual - people vary enormously.

    £17 an hour sounds amazingly cheap, unless you're in a depressed area (or whatever the PC term is these days). Check around to see what others charge - if she's markedly cheaper then that should ring alarm bells. Also, check her instructor's badge - if it's pink then she's not fully qualified. If either of those applies, (or just for peace of mind), I'd suggest going to another instructor for a second opinion.

    As said, you can use any car for your test. If you do, you'll need to supply a stick-on rear-view mirror for the examiner. Make sure there are no obvious defects (lights, tyres, etc). A good clean never does any harm!
    • Nadiya
    • By Nadiya 7th Oct 17, 5:38 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Nadiya
    • #7
    • 7th Oct 17, 5:38 PM
    • #7
    • 7th Oct 17, 5:38 PM
    Thank you all for your quick replies.

    One more query:

    I have just realised that while reversing in my husband's car (VAUXHALL astra), i don't have to use much of accelerator, just a tiny bit or sometimes can reverse just working on the clutch. The same doesn't work in my instructors car (skoda). Her car stalls if the gas rev is less than 15-20. So for reversing i have to concentrate more on the gas and then clutch. I asked her and she said the rev should not come down below 20.
    • Car 54
    • By Car 54 7th Oct 17, 5:54 PM
    • 2,305 Posts
    • 1,484 Thanks
    Car 54
    • #8
    • 7th Oct 17, 5:54 PM
    • #8
    • 7th Oct 17, 5:54 PM
    Thank you all for your quick replies.

    One more query:

    I have just realised that while reversing in my husband's car (VAUXHALL astra), i don't have to use much of accelerator, just a tiny bit or sometimes can reverse just working on the clutch. The same doesn't work in my instructors car (skoda). Her car stalls if the gas rev is less than 15-20. So for reversing i have to concentrate more on the gas and then clutch. I asked her and she said the rev should not come down below 20.
    Originally posted by Nadiya
    As you've found, cars do vary!

    Probably (but not necessarily) your husband's car is diesel and the other petrol.

    Even for a petrol car, 20 (2,000 rpm) sounds very high, but she must know her own car.
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 7th Oct 17, 5:55 PM
    • 9,760 Posts
    • 7,789 Thanks
    lincroft1710
    • #9
    • 7th Oct 17, 5:55 PM
    • #9
    • 7th Oct 17, 5:55 PM
    First, 70 to 80 hours is not unusual - people vary enormously.
    Originally posted by Car 54
    To those of us who passed our test in the 1960s/70s that seems incredible, most people I knew passed with less than 20 hrs tuition. I know the test wasn't as comprehensive as it is now, but that still seems excessive. But at least we could all do perfect hand signals (not that sort!!)
    • Nadiya
    • By Nadiya 7th Oct 17, 5:56 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Nadiya
    Thank you all for your quick replies.

    One more query:

    I have realised that while reversing in my husband's car (VAUXHALL astra), i don't have to use much of accelerator, just a tiny bit or sometimes can reverse just working on the clutch. The same doesn't work in my instructors car (skoda). Her car stalls if the gas rev is less than 15-20. So for reversing i have to concentrate more on the gas and then clutch. I asked her and she said the rev should not come down below 20.
    • cajef
    • By cajef 8th Oct 17, 1:53 PM
    • 4,529 Posts
    • 3,595 Thanks
    cajef
    If you have a test booked, I'm not sure why any driving instructor would not allow you (as a current customer) to use their car if that is what you want to do.
    Originally posted by footyguy
    Driving instructors pass rates are monitored by the DVSA and if they appear to have a poor pass rate or if an examiner thinks they are putting pupils in for tests when they are obviously not ready the instructor can be recalled for a retest of their licence to instruct.

    Consequently if an instructor thinks a pupil is not up to the required standard they can refuse to take them to test or let them use their car, advising the pupil that more lessons are needed and the test would have to be changed to a later date.
    Last edited by cajef; 09-10-2017 at 2:17 PM.
    I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.
    • Tarambor
    • By Tarambor 8th Oct 17, 2:05 PM
    • 1,346 Posts
    • 930 Thanks
    Tarambor
    I am also practicing in my husbands car.
    Originally posted by Nadiya
    In that case it doesn't matter that the instructors car isn't available for the test. You can take the test in your husband's car as long as it is roadworthy and fitted with L plates in the correct positions. There is no requirement to take a driving test in a learner school car.

    Tell her you're reducing the lessons and she can either accept it or you'll go elsewhere and not to worry about the car for the test because you'll drive your own.

    There seems to be a lot of driving instructors taking the mick with the length of time they drag on lessons. They did it with my son and strangely enough when he started to say he couldn't afford any more lessons his instructor suddenly decided he was capable of passing and he did indeed pass but one does wonder how long he had been ready.
    • cajef
    • By cajef 8th Oct 17, 2:10 PM
    • 4,529 Posts
    • 3,595 Thanks
    cajef
    In that case it doesn't matter that the instructors car isn't available for the test. You can take the test in your husband's car as long as it is roadworthy and fitted with L plates in the correct positions.
    Originally posted by Tarambor
    And a suitable internal rear view mirror fitted on the passenger side of the windscreen for the examiner.
    I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.
    • takman
    • By takman 8th Oct 17, 3:24 PM
    • 2,720 Posts
    • 2,273 Thanks
    takman
    First, 70 to 80 hours is not unusual - people vary enormously.
    Originally posted by Car 54
    I think paying for anywhere near 70 lessons is ridiculous considering the OP had another car to practice in.

    To put it into perspective my partner had 2 hours in total of paid lessons before she passed her test a few years ago. She had her own car to drive and almost everytime we went out she drove and I helped her as needed and she passed her test first time.

    I don't see the point in wasting hundreds of pounds on loads of lessons when you can simply be driving your own car to do most of the practice in and then have a lesson every few weeks to get some pointers.
    • Lingua
    • By Lingua 8th Oct 17, 4:19 PM
    • 197 Posts
    • 207 Thanks
    Lingua
    I recently passed with around 30hrs at roughly the same price as you. It seems strange that she's expecting you to continue with so many hours, as I'm fairly sure 30-40 is the norm. Booking it so far ahead however means you have to keep up some lessons to stay in practice.

    Be direct, and say you only want x lessons per week until your test, and ask for the occasional mock test to see if you are able enough to pass. Less than 15 minors and you pass.

    Lingua
    Long-Term Goal: £14'000 / £40'000 mortgage downpayment (2020)
    • unholyangel
    • By unholyangel 8th Oct 17, 4:59 PM
    • 11,420 Posts
    • 8,592 Thanks
    unholyangel
    Everyones different. I took very few official lessons but in addition to that, I was driving to/from work 5 days a week/doing private lessons in my own car. I also sat my test in my own car.

    I passed mine 2004 I think (it was not long after they added the hazard perception to the theory & vehicle maintenance to the practical).

    The test isn't checking to make sure you're a good driver. Only that you're competent enough to drive a vehicle unsupervised. Thats why you're allowed 15 driving faults (such as forgetting to check your mirror) but will fail if you even get 1 serious or dangerous fault (such as failing to perform an emergency stop quickly enough).
    Money doesn't solve poverty.....it creates it.
    • Nadiya
    • By Nadiya 8th Oct 17, 5:41 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Nadiya
    I spoke to her today about my furthur lessons. I told her i am practicing in my husband's car and would like to reduce my lessons to 1-2 hrs every week. She said to take the test in my husband's car if i am planning to practice in his car. I tried explaining her that i am not leaving her, i am just reducing my hours. That will still take me to around 48 to 50 lessons with her. She at the end said if you are leaving me now and if you don't pass my mock test then i will not give u my car.

    My husband's car is not test standard. Don't know if i should be looking for different instructor now.
    • takman
    • By takman 8th Oct 17, 6:02 PM
    • 2,720 Posts
    • 2,273 Thanks
    takman
    I spoke to her today about my furthur lessons. I told her i am practicing in my husband's car and would like to reduce my lessons to 1-2 hrs every week. She said to take the test in my husband's car if i am planning to practice in his car. I tried explaining her that i am not leaving her, i am just reducing my hours. That will still take me to around 48 to 50 lessons with her. She at the end said if you are leaving me now and if you don't pass my mock test then i will not give u my car.

    My husband's car is not test standard. Don't know if i should be looking for different instructor now.
    Originally posted by Nadiya
    How exactly is your husband's car not to test standards?. As long as it's legal to drive on the roads, you have a stuck on mirror costing a few pounds and your insurance company don't allow it (which is likely if they insure learners) then there isn't a problem.

    If I were you I would stop lessons with her now and just practice in your husband's car, especially with your instructors replies to your discussion.

    In 40 hours of lessons your instructor should have covered everything you needed to know, it's just a case of lots of practice so your confident in doing everything right. Then when you feel ready find an instructor who will take you out and determine if your ready for the test or not.
    • lister
    • By lister 8th Oct 17, 8:13 PM
    • 201 Posts
    • 219 Thanks
    lister
    My experience of students who are not going to be ready for their test is that they know it. They know it because I teach them to analyse their own driving.

    Driving instructors can and should refuse to take anyone to test who they don't think is up to standard, but in almost all cases I get them to tell me, not the other way around. They know, they just need a little nudge to admit it to themselves and to me.

    What most people not in the industry fail to realise is that a driver of a poor standard on test is far more dangerous to themselves, the examiner and other road users than on a driving lesson. As an instructor I can intervene verbally or physically as soon as a situation looks like it is going to get out of hand. Examiners have to give you every last possible moment to fix it for yourself, so run the risk of leaving intervention too late. Add that to the fact that drivers under pressure will make more mistakes, and will be more likely to react poorly to their mistakes, and you can having a ticking timebomb.

    Essentially, if your instructor is still sometimes using their controls or directing you verbally to correct a significant mistake or regular smaller mistakes, there may be an issue. If not and you are confident tackling all kinds of road situations, then I would be suspicious of their motives.
    • spikyone
    • By spikyone 9th Oct 17, 11:07 AM
    • 410 Posts
    • 569 Thanks
    spikyone
    I think there's a lot of poor advice on this thread. None of us knows how the OP drives, or whether they're ready for the test. For anyone not familiar, a search online for Maureen Rees from the TV show Driving School ought to show that we all learn at different rates. Saying "that's too many lessons" or "just take the test in your husband's car", without anything other than the OP saying "this is costing me a lot of money" does not help.

    My advice would be two-fold:
    1) Ask the current instructor where she feels there are issues with your driving.
    2) Find another reputable instructor and see if they'll take you out for an hour or two to evaluate your driving, and see how their feedback compares to your original instructor.

    If you feel that you get on better with the second instructor, you can always switch to using them instead.

    I would also be wary about practicing in your husband's car if the controls feel different to the one you're learning in. That could mean you're wasting the first part of your lesson getting used to your instructor's car again. With any activity where you're learning an action, you want to be committing that action to your subconscious "muscle memory" so that you can do it without thinking. Switching between cars will make it much harder to do that because you'll always have to think about what you're doing.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

269Posts Today

1,802Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • RT @LordsEconCom: On Tuesday Martin Lewis, Hannah Morrish & Shakira Martin gave evidence to the Cttee. Read the full transcript here: https?

  • Ta ta for now. Half term's starting, so I'm exchanging my MoneySavingExpert hat for one that says Daddy in big letters. See you in a week.

  • RT @thismorning: Can @MartinSLewis' deals save YOU cash? ???? https://t.co/igbHCwzeiN

  • Follow Martin