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    • grahamgoo
    • By grahamgoo 7th Oct 17, 11:53 AM
    • 279Posts
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    grahamgoo
    Replacing Coil Spring Cost
    • #1
    • 7th Oct 17, 11:53 AM
    Replacing Coil Spring Cost 7th Oct 17 at 11:53 AM
    I've just had new tyres fitted to my 2010 Toyota Yaris (it's done ~30K miles).

    The garage told me that one of the front springs was broken and should be replaced. They have quoted about £150 (I have already paid for tracking - not yet done - as part of the tyre fitting, otherwise that would be on top).

    Is that a reasonable price? I certainly wouldn't be confident attempting the job myself so I will need to get it done at a garage! Also I have read differing opinions on whether to get the other side spring replaced at the same time. I don't want to do that if it's not necessary as it would double the bill, is there any advantage in doing so?

    Thanks :-)
Page 1
    • roneik
    • By roneik 7th Oct 17, 12:18 PM
    • 116 Posts
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    roneik
    • #2
    • 7th Oct 17, 12:18 PM
    • #2
    • 7th Oct 17, 12:18 PM
    I personally would have both changed, the price quoted depends on what the cost of the spring is. the suspension has to be dropped from the strut. The spring has to be compressed and the brake calliper supported .I would say about an hours labour.If you were doing it yourself you would need the means to support car with axle stands and a spring compressor.
    .
    • Joe Horner
    • By Joe Horner 7th Oct 17, 1:42 PM
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    Joe Horner
    • #3
    • 7th Oct 17, 1:42 PM
    • #3
    • 7th Oct 17, 1:42 PM
    No problem getting just one side done. In the good old days when springs lasted for decades, and were rusty before they left the showroom, by the time one broke the other would usually have softened / settled. So changing both made sense. But today spring breakage is an almost random occurence thanks to more highly stressed and damage-intolerant alloys so the other side won't have had time to sag.

    As for cost, just had one done on my wife's Mondeo which cost £70 but the work involved - and the cost of the part - can be very different on different cars.
    • Inner Zone
    • By Inner Zone 7th Oct 17, 2:05 PM
    • 1,841 Posts
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    Inner Zone
    • #4
    • 7th Oct 17, 2:05 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Oct 17, 2:05 PM
    No problem getting just one side done. In the good old days when springs lasted for decades, and were rusty before they left the showroom, by the time one broke the other would usually have softened / settled. So changing both made sense. But today spring breakage is an almost random occurence thanks to more highly stressed and damage-intolerant alloys so the other side won't have had time to sag.

    As for cost, just had one done on my wife's Mondeo which cost £70 but the work involved - and the cost of the part - can be very different on different cars.
    Originally posted by Joe Horner
    Have to disagree. OP change them both at the same time, if one has snapped the other won't be far off doing the same.
    • Joe Horner
    • By Joe Horner 7th Oct 17, 2:33 PM
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    Joe Horner
    • #5
    • 7th Oct 17, 2:33 PM
    • #5
    • 7th Oct 17, 2:33 PM
    Modern springs snap because of stress raisers - defects in or near the surface that concentrate stress at a point and cause the metal to crack. That can be a defect in the metal, a rust spot when the coating's failed, or damage such as scratches / chips from being under a car. Rust spots seem to be the most common (unsurprisingly).

    The fact one has developed a stress raiser and subsequently failed gives no indication at all of the condition of the other - a rust spot or a defect doesn't magically appear in sympathy on the left spring just because the right spring has one!

    So, no, "the other won't be far behind" is technical nonsense - good for selling springs but still technically wrong.
    • Inner Zone
    • By Inner Zone 7th Oct 17, 2:43 PM
    • 1,841 Posts
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    Inner Zone
    • #6
    • 7th Oct 17, 2:43 PM
    • #6
    • 7th Oct 17, 2:43 PM
    You believe what ever you wish too. I am speaking from experience and failure is not a random occurrence as you state.
    • Joe Horner
    • By Joe Horner 7th Oct 17, 2:50 PM
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    Joe Horner
    • #7
    • 7th Oct 17, 2:50 PM
    • #7
    • 7th Oct 17, 2:50 PM
    You are aware that random can mean that two break close together? I've seen springs break at less than 6 months old, I've also seen them last for years.

    If you examine the break it always starts with an identifiable stress raiser, and the formation of that (whether rust, flaw during manufacture, fitting damage or whatever) is essentially random.

    The reason for breakages being common nowadays is simply that the springs are engineered with very little safety margin, so a flaw or damage that, on an old spring, wouldn't have mattered is now enough to cause failure. But they don't break without a flaw or damage developing first, and that process is completely unpredictable.
    • ohreally
    • By ohreally 7th Oct 17, 3:41 PM
    • 6,268 Posts
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    ohreally
    • #8
    • 7th Oct 17, 3:41 PM
    • #8
    • 7th Oct 17, 3:41 PM
    No problem getting just one side done.
    Originally posted by Joe Horner
    Its not one side though, its a corner.

    Op, good practice would be to change the axle pair but many will replace the damaged spring only.

    Your choice.
    • consumers_revenge
    • By consumers_revenge 7th Oct 17, 4:47 PM
    • 2,893 Posts
    • 1,540 Thanks
    consumers_revenge
    • #9
    • 7th Oct 17, 4:47 PM
    • #9
    • 7th Oct 17, 4:47 PM
    Only changed one side on an older focus, garage agreed no reason to change both and drivers side will be different stresses as only one person a lot of time so they won't get even ware anyway.

    Done and dusted £105
    • BeenThroughItAll
    • By BeenThroughItAll 7th Oct 17, 7:08 PM
    • 4,519 Posts
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    BeenThroughItAll
    I must have had about ten springs break over the last ten years or so, and not once have I ever changed both at the same time.

    Also, not once have any kittens, nuns or children been harmed as a result, and my car hasn't suddenly veered off the road resulting in my fiery death.
    • reeac
    • By reeac 7th Oct 17, 10:33 PM
    • 1,100 Posts
    • 437 Thanks
    reeac
    The Yaris must have McPherson strut front suspension in which case the spring/tyre clearance is small and spring fracture can quite often lead to the broken end puncturing the tyre. Double wishbone suspension has the spring further inboard... hence very little risk of tyre damage.
    • Richard53
    • By Richard53 8th Oct 17, 5:33 AM
    • 2,533 Posts
    • 2,159 Thanks
    Richard53
    I had a front coil spring break on a Mondeo. From memory, it was about £75 to have it replaced. I decided to have both sides done, on the basis that the cost was modest and (perhaps wrongly) that the other wouldn't be far behind - the car had done about 60k miles. I was glad I did, because with the new springs the front of the car was riding about an inch higher, measured from ground to wheelarch. Clearly, the springs had sagged in the 7-8 years since the car was made. If I had only had one side done, the car would have been sagging to one side.
    An hour alone spells freedom to the slave.
    • BeenThroughItAll
    • By BeenThroughItAll 8th Oct 17, 10:15 AM
    • 4,519 Posts
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    BeenThroughItAll
    I had a front coil spring break on a Mondeo. From memory, it was about £75 to have it replaced. I decided to have both sides done, on the basis that the cost was modest and (perhaps wrongly) that the other wouldn't be far behind - the car had done about 60k miles. I was glad I did, because with the new springs the front of the car was riding about an inch higher, measured from ground to wheelarch. Clearly, the springs had sagged in the 7-8 years since the car was made. If I had only had one side done, the car would have been sagging to one side.
    Originally posted by Richard53
    Or they fitted the wrong springs?

    I say that only because none of the springs I've ever changed have been on cars under 9-10yo, and I've never had any appreciable difference in ride height between old and new save a couple of mm - and that includes cars with big, heavy V8 petrol and V6 diesel engines.
    • grahamgoo
    • By grahamgoo 8th Oct 17, 1:41 PM
    • 279 Posts
    • 144 Thanks
    grahamgoo
    OP here, thanks everyone. from what I can gather, the amount the garage have quoted seems quite high - I might phone around and see what other quotes I can get for both sides to be done - although I guess I'll end up paying again for the tracking if I take it elsewhere it could still work out cheaper. I need to get the MOT done soon anyway. I could do without spending £300 for both sides but safety has to come first!
    • BeenThroughItAll
    • By BeenThroughItAll 8th Oct 17, 3:01 PM
    • 4,519 Posts
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    BeenThroughItAll
    OP here, thanks everyone. from what I can gather, the amount the garage have quoted seems quite high - I might phone around and see what other quotes I can get for both sides to be done - although I guess I'll end up paying again for the tracking if I take it elsewhere it could still work out cheaper. I need to get the MOT done soon anyway. I could do without spending £300 for both sides but safety has to come first!
    Originally posted by grahamgoo
    So only do one side then, and save £150.
    • Joe Horner
    • By Joe Horner 8th Oct 17, 3:26 PM
    • 4,127 Posts
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    Joe Horner
    ^^^ Wot he said.

    Changing one really doesn't impact on safety at all!


    eta: looking round the net it seems that £150 / side is fairly typical for front springs on a Yaris.
    • bigadaj
    • By bigadaj 8th Oct 17, 3:56 PM
    • 10,329 Posts
    • 6,626 Thanks
    bigadaj
    ^^^ Wot he said.

    Changing one really doesn't impact on safety at all!


    eta: looking round the net it seems that £150 / side is fairly typical for front springs on a Yaris.
    Originally posted by Joe Horner
    And it's only got front brakes so should be cheaper still.
    • Richard53
    • By Richard53 9th Oct 17, 12:18 AM
    • 2,533 Posts
    • 2,159 Thanks
    Richard53
    Or they fitted the wrong springs?
    Originally posted by BeenThroughItAll
    I don't think so. I had been thinking for a while that the front of the car looked a bit low to the ground (compared with how it used to be, and other similar cars I observed around the place), and with the new springs it looked right again.
    An hour alone spells freedom to the slave.
    • bris
    • By bris 9th Oct 17, 2:00 AM
    • 6,937 Posts
    • 5,956 Thanks
    bris
    I did my sons 2012 Yaris myself after he had an accident, although it wasn't the spring it was the strut. Didn't need a spring but the old one obviously had to come out to get swapped over. I bought a spring compression set from Ebay for about 12 quid and it took me about 2 hours. There was a bit stripping out under the bonnet to get to the top bolt but it was all pretty straight forward. Wishbone had to be changed at the same time. If you can use a socket set you can do it yourself, it's pretty straight forward.


    I suppose not many people are confident enough to have a go but in the end it's all just nuts and bolts. Surprisingly easy when you gain a little confidence and the camera on the phone ensures you know exactly what goes where when it comes to putting it all back in place.
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 9th Oct 17, 9:08 AM
    • 12,906 Posts
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    Gloomendoom
    I must have had about ten springs break over the last ten years or so, and not once have I ever changed both at the same time.
    Originally posted by BeenThroughItAll
    I had no idea that broken springs were such a common occurrance.

    I have only had one spring break since I started driving in the late 70's. A rear leaf spring on a Morris Marina with about a million miles on the clock (NHX 566L if it is still about).
    Advice; it rhymes with mice. Advise; it rhymes with wise.
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