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  • FIRST POST
    • Bobbyblu
    • By Bobbyblu 6th Oct 17, 6:07 PM
    • 11Posts
    • 1Thanks
    Bobbyblu
    Driving colleague's cars in work carpark
    • #1
    • 6th Oct 17, 6:07 PM
    Driving colleague's cars in work carpark 6th Oct 17 at 6:07 PM
    Hi,
    I work for a company where parking is in very high demand. There are no other options of where to park other than public transport which is difficult as it's out in the sticks.
    We are expected to park up very tightly in front and beside each other and leave our keys in the office. We go out on our work vehicles for the day and all return at different hours which vary day to day. If we need to leave before others we have to move their cars in order to get to our own and likewise they move mine
    Work have now made it clear they are not responsible for any accidents or damage in the carpark etc so where do we stand legally. What happens if I damage someone's car when I move it. I'm only a named driver on my own car insurance so on days when I have to take the car where do I stand. It really doesn't sit right with me that we have to do this.
    Many thanks for any advice.
Page 1
    • hollie.weimeraner
    • By hollie.weimeraner 6th Oct 17, 6:14 PM
    • 1,422 Posts
    • 827 Thanks
    hollie.weimeraner
    • #2
    • 6th Oct 17, 6:14 PM
    • #2
    • 6th Oct 17, 6:14 PM
    You are almost certainly not covered by any motor insurance policy and depending on whether the car park is classed as private or a place where the public have access you could also possibly be liable to police prosecution for driving without insurance.

    If the car park is employees only it's likely to be private land but you would need to clarify that with your employers.

    Additionally, by leaving your keys for anyone to move the car you may also be liable to not having insurance cover if your car is stolen with the keys.

    Sounds like a can of worms to me
    • Bobbyblu
    • By Bobbyblu 6th Oct 17, 6:19 PM
    • 11 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Bobbyblu
    • #3
    • 6th Oct 17, 6:19 PM
    • #3
    • 6th Oct 17, 6:19 PM
    Thank you, as I said it doesn't sit right with me. It is on a farm, and my employer rents some units but there are other units that are rented out to other businesses. Work wpuld be unlikely to be helpful if I broached the subject with them.
    • Quentin
    • By Quentin 6th Oct 17, 6:36 PM
    • 33,500 Posts
    • 17,375 Thanks
    Quentin
    • #4
    • 6th Oct 17, 6:36 PM
    • #4
    • 6th Oct 17, 6:36 PM
    You are right to be worried. Your insurance as a named driver doesn't give you any cover at all when driving other cars. You do so illegally!!


    If you do any damage to any person or property when driving a car you are not covered by insurance to drive then you will end up being personally liable for any costs - could be very expensive should you injure someone!
    Last edited by Quentin; 07-10-2017 at 9:15 AM.
    • n217970
    • By n217970 6th Oct 17, 6:49 PM
    • 240 Posts
    • 177 Thanks
    n217970
    • #5
    • 6th Oct 17, 6:49 PM
    • #5
    • 6th Oct 17, 6:49 PM
    I am sure work will be inclined to take some form of action when they start to see everybody in the office wasting an hour a day shunting cars around if you get what I mean...
    • Bobbyblu
    • By Bobbyblu 6th Oct 17, 6:57 PM
    • 11 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Bobbyblu
    • #6
    • 6th Oct 17, 6:57 PM
    • #6
    • 6th Oct 17, 6:57 PM
    They wouldn't get paid for any moving anyway, it's a 'your only earning when the wheels are turning' type place.
    • onomatopoeia99
    • By onomatopoeia99 6th Oct 17, 7:00 PM
    • 3,623 Posts
    • 7,975 Thanks
    onomatopoeia99
    • #7
    • 6th Oct 17, 7:00 PM
    • #7
    • 6th Oct 17, 7:00 PM
    There is also Vnuk to consider. Google it (it happened on a farm).
    INTP, nerd, libertarian and scifi geek.
    Home is where my books are.
    • Bobbyblu
    • By Bobbyblu 6th Oct 17, 7:52 PM
    • 11 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Bobbyblu
    • #8
    • 6th Oct 17, 7:52 PM
    • #8
    • 6th Oct 17, 7:52 PM
    Thank you everyone
    • loskie
    • By loskie 6th Oct 17, 8:17 PM
    • 1,158 Posts
    • 697 Thanks
    loskie
    • #9
    • 6th Oct 17, 8:17 PM
    • #9
    • 6th Oct 17, 8:17 PM
    It will be classed as a public place if used by various employees/employers. Rules of the road apply. It sounds like a recipe for disaster.
    • facade
    • By facade 6th Oct 17, 8:20 PM
    • 2,930 Posts
    • 1,493 Thanks
    facade
    Your only option is to refuse to move someone else's car, or to leave the keys for your own.

    Your employer won't care in the slightest that you all have to wait (unpaid) until the last person to arrive (who logically will be the last to finish) gets back to move his car.

    I'd look for a better job, or get a bicycle, that could go in the van with you....
    I want to go back to The Olden Days, when every single thing that I can think of was better.....

    (except air quality and Medical Science )
    • Warwick Hunt
    • By Warwick Hunt 6th Oct 17, 9:03 PM
    • 664 Posts
    • 339 Thanks
    Warwick Hunt
    It will be classed as a public place if used by various employees/employers. Rules of the road apply. It sounds like a recipe for disaster.
    Originally posted by loskie
    No it won't, it will be a public place if it's open open to the public.
    • Bobbyblu
    • By Bobbyblu 6th Oct 17, 9:38 PM
    • 11 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Bobbyblu
    So I definitely am not insured at all as I am only a named driver. And it's dubious as to whether others are. And even if we did have adequate insurance it probably wouldn't be valid on the land anyway. Bit of a catch 22 really. They tell us we have to park like that that and move other people's vehicles yet all drivers park at their own risk, they are not responsible even of its their vans/buses that hit your car.
    Slightly !!!!!!ed either way then, unless we refuse to do it.
    • Warwick Hunt
    • By Warwick Hunt 6th Oct 17, 9:47 PM
    • 664 Posts
    • 339 Thanks
    Warwick Hunt
    So I definitely am not insured at all as I am only a named driver. And it's dubious as to whether others are. And even if we did have adequate insurance it probably wouldn't be valid on the land anyway. Bit of a catch 22 really. They tell us we have to park like that that and move other people's vehicles yet all drivers park at their own risk, they are not responsible even of its their vans/buses that hit your car.
    Slightly !!!!!!ed either way then, unless we refuse to do it.
    Originally posted by Bobbyblu
    It would..
    • Bobbyblu
    • By Bobbyblu 6th Oct 17, 10:08 PM
    • 11 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Bobbyblu
    Ok. Well I know that I am not at least. Thank you
    • paddedjohn
    • By paddedjohn 6th Oct 17, 11:36 PM
    • 7,075 Posts
    • 7,725 Thanks
    paddedjohn
    If you are only a named driver on your policy who uses the car the most?
    Be Alert..........Britain needs lerts.
    • loskie
    • By loskie 7th Oct 17, 7:31 AM
    • 1,158 Posts
    • 697 Thanks
    loskie
    No it won't, it will be a public place if it's open open to the public.
    Originally posted by Warwick Hunt
    This is wrong: the fact that employees, employers, postmen, parcel co's access it means it is a public place. Just as it is if you drive up and down your private farm road drunk and hit the postman in his van you would be done for DD.
    • Bobbyblu
    • By Bobbyblu 7th Oct 17, 8:26 AM
    • 11 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Bobbyblu
    Really sorry but I can't figure how to quote answers.
    Paddedjohn, my husband uses it the most but on the occasions I take it I wondered where we stand plus I am still having to drive other staff members cars.
    • Bobbyblu
    • By Bobbyblu 7th Oct 17, 8:32 AM
    • 11 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Bobbyblu
    If you are only a named driver on your policy who uses the car the most?
    Originally posted by paddedjohn
    Think I've done it. Sorry my husband uses it most and normally takes me in but there are occasions I can have it. I'm still having to move other staff members cars though.
    • angrycrow
    • By angrycrow 7th Oct 17, 9:27 AM
    • 406 Posts
    • 307 Thanks
    angrycrow
    As a named driver unless the policy certificate says otherwise which is very unlikely you are not insured to drive any vehicle other than the one you are named on the insurance for. When you are moving a colleagues car you are doing so uninsured. As has been stated above the fact that employees and delivery drivers have access to the site means for insurance and police prosecution purposes it would be regarded as a public road.

    So for example whilst moving a colleagues car you hit another car, person or object you would be personally responsible for the full cost of any damage incurred and if the police were called you would face a driving without insurance charge which normally incurs 6 points and results in increased insurance premiums. The reality is the insurers of the car you were driving uninsured would pay for the damage and recover the full costs from you.

    Another thing to consider is that if a colleague similarly uninsured moves your car and causes damage your husbands insurers would have to pay for the damage but would then look to recover these costs from you for giving permission to an uninsured driver and the driver for not having insurance.

    These types of arrangements never end well.
    • Bobbyblu
    • By Bobbyblu 7th Oct 17, 9:41 AM
    • 11 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Bobbyblu
    As a named driver unless the policy certificate says otherwise which is very unlikely you are not insured to drive any vehicle other than the one you are named on the insurance for. When you are moving a colleagues car you are doing so uninsured. As has been stated above the fact that employees and delivery drivers have access to the site means for insurance and police prosecution purposes it would be regarded as a public road.

    So for example whilst moving a colleagues car you hit another car, person or object you would be personally responsible for the full cost of any damage incurred and if the police were called you would face a driving without insurance charge which normally incurs 6 points and results in increased insurance premiums. The reality is the insurers of the car you were driving uninsured would pay for the damage and recover the full costs from you.

    Another thing to consider is that if a colleague similarly uninsured moves your car and causes damage your husbands insurers would have to pay for the damage but would then look to recover these costs from you for giving permission to an uninsured driver and the driver for not having insurance.

    These types of arrangements never end well.
    Originally posted by angrycrow
    It's as I thought then. I'm not insured. I need to look for another position as I know bringing it up will not end well.
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