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  • FIRST POST
    • segovia1
    • By segovia1 6th Oct 17, 12:59 PM
    • 4Posts
    • 0Thanks
    segovia1
    Growing your own - complete beginner!
    • #1
    • 6th Oct 17, 12:59 PM
    Growing your own - complete beginner! 6th Oct 17 at 12:59 PM
    We've recently inherited a lovely veg patch in our new garden as a result of a house move. I'd really like to start using it from next spring to grow some food! It would be great to get our two children involved too (aged 9 and 6).


    My question is: does anyone have recommendations for good, simple books for beginners to get started?


    Thanks
Page 1
    • Farway
    • By Farway 6th Oct 17, 2:56 PM
    • 5,575 Posts
    • 7,028 Thanks
    Farway
    • #2
    • 6th Oct 17, 2:56 PM
    • #2
    • 6th Oct 17, 2:56 PM
    Have a browse in local charity shops, a book with pictures is ideal, so you can see what it "should" look like.

    It is easy to make gardening complicated, even easier to just get on with it

    Try and avoid stuff that that is likely to be difficult for a newbie and may be disappointing, like melons or sweetcorn for instance

    And grow what you & the family will eat, no point growing lettuce if everyone hates salad

    A good starting point is the back of the seed packet

    And on here, loads of experience and common sense right here on this board

    PS, here's an idea to get your children involved. Halloween is coming up soon, get them to grow their own for next year. Either buy a packet of seeds, or even easier & a bit of early garden learning, save seeds from a pumpkin you are using this year. If not using one, you can pick them up cheaply the day after Halloween and use some of the seeds from that
    Pumpkins are easy to grow, big ones are not so easy
    Last edited by Farway; 06-10-2017 at 3:53 PM. Reason: PS added
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 6th Oct 17, 4:42 PM
    • 7,590 Posts
    • 12,644 Thanks
    andrewf75
    • #3
    • 6th Oct 17, 4:42 PM
    • #3
    • 6th Oct 17, 4:42 PM
    start watching Gardeners world on friday nights as well, essential viewing.

    agree with above advice, the books are all much of a muchness, just experiment and see what works and don't be disheartened when something eats it all!
    • Mnd
    • By Mnd 6th Oct 17, 7:19 PM
    • 156 Posts
    • 166 Thanks
    Mnd
    • #4
    • 6th Oct 17, 7:19 PM
    • #4
    • 6th Oct 17, 7:19 PM
    Don't buy books, get to the library.

    You can get onion sets, ready now to go in and overwinter..check they are for that use though

    Shalotts early new year, we tend to use these as salad onions

    Good luck and enjoy your gardening
    • Linda32
    • By Linda32 6th Oct 17, 8:47 PM
    • 4,075 Posts
    • 9,059 Thanks
    Linda32
    • #5
    • 6th Oct 17, 8:47 PM
    • #5
    • 6th Oct 17, 8:47 PM
    Exciting times indeed

    Think about what you actually like and then what you eat.

    For example, we never have a hot dinner in the summer month, therefore I don't grow any cabbage or cauliflower. But we do like both of them. However, I do grow carrots because they are the base for a lot of mince based meals which we have during the winter.

    I do grow tomatoes because we buy them throughout the year and I freeze any extra for make a tomato sauce to go over pasta at this time of year.

    I grow soft fruit to freeze because OH has this with yogurt for puddings. You might not want to do this because the fruit is a permanent plant which will take up your space.
    I've got half an allotment.

    If you buy bagged salad or herb, then growing these will certainly save you money.

    I second watching Gardeners' World on Friday night and also The Beechgrove Garden on Sunday morning. Either on catch up or record it if you can.
    • Spendingqueen
    • By Spendingqueen 6th Oct 17, 9:12 PM
    • 71 Posts
    • 9 Thanks
    Spendingqueen
    • #6
    • 6th Oct 17, 9:12 PM
    • #6
    • 6th Oct 17, 9:12 PM
    We are also starting a small patch of garden for growing - We want to start with carrots, broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower - I read somewhere that now is the right time to plant seeds outside - Is that correct?
    • Linda32
    • By Linda32 6th Oct 17, 10:40 PM
    • 4,075 Posts
    • 9,059 Thanks
    Linda32
    • #7
    • 6th Oct 17, 10:40 PM
    • #7
    • 6th Oct 17, 10:40 PM
    We are also starting a small patch of garden for growing - We want to start with carrots, broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower - I read somewhere that now is the right time to plant seeds outside - Is that correct?
    Originally posted by Spendingqueen
    There are one or two exception to your question but to keep things straight forward, wait until next spring. Spend the winter planning what you want to get from your plot.
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