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    • sillygoose
    • By sillygoose 5th Oct 17, 10:27 PM
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    sillygoose
    Quick question reveal reserve?
    • #1
    • 5th Oct 17, 10:27 PM
    Quick question reveal reserve? 5th Oct 17 at 10:27 PM
    Hi

    On Ebay is there any catch to telling a bidder what your reserve is set at? or is it a complete no-no? I can't think of why not.

    Thanks!!
Page 1
    • z1a
    • By z1a 5th Oct 17, 10:40 PM
    • 803 Posts
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    z1a
    • #2
    • 5th Oct 17, 10:40 PM
    • #2
    • 5th Oct 17, 10:40 PM
    Never seen the point in reserves, just start at that price.
    If I ever want something and it's showing as "Reserve not met" & seller won't reveal it, I then "accidently" bid £10000, then retract as "wrong amount bid, and rebid £10. I then know what reserve is, and whether to bother or not.
    • sillygoose
    • By sillygoose 5th Oct 17, 10:47 PM
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    sillygoose
    • #3
    • 5th Oct 17, 10:47 PM
    • #3
    • 5th Oct 17, 10:47 PM
    Never seen the point in reserves, just start at that price.
    If I ever want something and it's showing as "Reserve not met" & seller won't reveal it, I then "accidently" bid £10000, then retract as "wrong amount bid, and rebid £10. I then know what reserve is, and whether to bother or not.
    Originally posted by z1a
    Thanks.. I will probably let them know if it helps get them involved.
    • Marcon
    • By Marcon 6th Oct 17, 1:41 AM
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    Marcon
    • #4
    • 6th Oct 17, 1:41 AM
    • #4
    • 6th Oct 17, 1:41 AM
    Why list with a reserve price? What advantage is there? As previous answer has suggested, start your listings at whatever minimum you will accept.
    • sillygoose
    • By sillygoose 6th Oct 17, 7:01 AM
    • 4,100 Posts
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    sillygoose
    • #5
    • 6th Oct 17, 7:01 AM
    • #5
    • 6th Oct 17, 7:01 AM
    Why list with a reserve price? What advantage is there? As previous answer has suggested, start your listings at whatever minimum you will accept.
    Originally posted by Marcon
    This is my first sale for many years so trying to find my way as a lot has changed.. I had it in mind ebay used to charge higher fees if you started above 0.99p .. but as I said its been a long time!
    • soolin
    • By soolin 6th Oct 17, 8:15 AM
    • 59,567 Posts
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    soolin
    • #6
    • 6th Oct 17, 8:15 AM
    • #6
    • 6th Oct 17, 8:15 AM
    This is my first sale for many years so trying to find my way as a lot has changed.. I had it in mind ebay used to charge higher fees if you started above 0.99p .. but as I said its been a long time!
    Originally posted by sillygoose
    Things have changed- now a reserve is the most expensive way of all to list. For most private sellers in good standing listings are generally free up to your listing limit, add a reserve and it sky rockets.

    I know you will have seen the cost when you listed, but adding a reserve is an additional 4% of the listing price which is payable regardless of whether item sells or not.

    https://sellercentre.ebay.co.uk/private/what-fees-youll-pay

    It really does pay to check costs whenever using a site after a period of time away, ebay are using the Ryanair method now (for private sellers anyway!) of no cost listings until you add any optional extras.
    I'm the Board Guide for the Ebay Board , Charities Board , Dosh & Disability , Up Your Income and the Local MoneySaving-England board which means I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum running smoothly. However, do remember, board guides don't read every post. If you spot an illegal or inappropriate post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com (it's not part of my role to deal with this). Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.com
    New to Forum? Guide
    • sillygoose
    • By sillygoose 6th Oct 17, 8:46 AM
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    sillygoose
    • #7
    • 6th Oct 17, 8:46 AM
    • #7
    • 6th Oct 17, 8:46 AM
    Things have changed- now a reserve is the most expensive way of all to list. For most private sellers in good standing listings are generally free up to your listing limit, add a reserve and it sky rockets.

    I know you will have seen the cost when you listed, but adding a reserve is an additional 4% of the listing price which is payable regardless of whether item sells or not.

    https://sellercentre.ebay.co.uk/private/what-fees-youll-pay

    It really does pay to check costs whenever using a site after a period of time away, ebay are using the Ryanair method now (for private sellers anyway!) of no cost listings until you add any optional extras.
    Originally posted by soolin
    Thanks.. I see now I should have just set a start price and not a reserve.. I did think the fee was high but wrongly assumed they would get me either way

    Too late now I guess as bidding under way... lesson learnt for next time

    On the good side I suppose it its something I got 'free' so any reasonable return is a bonus
    • zerog
    • By zerog 6th Oct 17, 9:24 AM
    • 2,306 Posts
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    zerog
    • #8
    • 6th Oct 17, 9:24 AM
    • #8
    • 6th Oct 17, 9:24 AM
    Because buyers are idiots. Case in point: two sellers (unrelated, from what I can tell) with similar feedback listed more or less the exact same thing, one starting at 99p and one starting at £99.99, the £99.99 one got no bids at all, and the 99p starter was bid up to £110+.

    From watching this play out, and previously getting no bids on higher value items, I always list in this category starting at 99p and it gets very stressful because the idiots all bid on the final day. I shouldn't be calling them idiots but they often send stupid questions, which results in them being blocked...

    For the first 7 days, the highest bid may never go above £10 so I keep worrying that I am going to lose £100. But in the final hour I've never been disappointed.

    However, I don't know whether having a reserve price puts off any of the idiots. When I have seen it used, the item usually doesn't sell.
    • soolin
    • By soolin 6th Oct 17, 9:39 AM
    • 59,567 Posts
    • 42,256 Thanks
    soolin
    • #9
    • 6th Oct 17, 9:39 AM
    • #9
    • 6th Oct 17, 9:39 AM
    Because buyers are idiots. Case in point: two sellers (unrelated, from what I can tell) with similar feedback listed more or less the exact same thing, one starting at 99p and one starting at £99.99, the £99.99 one got no bids at all, and the 99p starter was bid up to £110+.

    From watching this play out, and previously getting no bids on higher value items, I always list in this category starting at 99p and it gets very stressful because the idiots all bid on the final day. I shouldn't be calling them idiots but they often send stupid questions, which results in them being blocked...

    For the first 7 days, the highest bid may never go above £10 so I keep worrying that I am going to lose £100. But in the final hour I've never been disappointed.

    However, I don't know whether having a reserve price puts off any of the idiots. When I have seen it used, the item usually doesn't sell.
    Originally posted by zerog
    I never ever risk a 99p start regardless of all of eBay's 'helpful' suggestions.

    I have a minimum price in my head when I sell, and that's what I start at. If I am prepared to take 99p then I'll start it there, if I'll take £80 I start it there, if it doesn't sell I still have the item and can try it again on a different day. Alternatively, I'll use BIN with best offer and start a bit above my hoped for price, and wait and see what offers come in.

    I don't play games on ebay anymore, the constant glitches, down time and blocks on certain areas being unable to bid (all of which are not uncommon) make it a risky game.
    I'm the Board Guide for the Ebay Board , Charities Board , Dosh & Disability , Up Your Income and the Local MoneySaving-England board which means I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum running smoothly. However, do remember, board guides don't read every post. If you spot an illegal or inappropriate post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com (it's not part of my role to deal with this). Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.com
    New to Forum? Guide
    • Moogles44
    • By Moogles44 6th Oct 17, 9:42 AM
    • 137 Posts
    • 52 Thanks
    Moogles44
    Reserve prices often kill a sale in my opinion. I see lovely items where people just don't seem to bother trying to bid if they see reserve price. I also pass it on by.

    Buy it now is best to me but others views may differ
    • NaughtiusMaximus
    • By NaughtiusMaximus 6th Oct 17, 10:30 AM
    • 523 Posts
    • 1,272 Thanks
    NaughtiusMaximus
    Why list with a reserve price? What advantage is there? As previous answer has suggested, start your listings at whatever minimum you will accept.
    Originally posted by Marcon
    As a bidder if I see an item which has a reserve price it tends to put me off as I assume the reserve price is unreasonably high.
    • NaughtiusMaximus
    • By NaughtiusMaximus 6th Oct 17, 10:37 AM
    • 523 Posts
    • 1,272 Thanks
    NaughtiusMaximus
    I never ever risk a 99p start regardless of all of eBay's 'helpful' suggestions.
    Originally posted by soolin
    Depends what you're selling. For common items where there are always multiple listings (eg Blu Rays, games) it's a bad idea, but for rarely listed items which have a niche market (eg rare CDs/Vinyl, certain collectibles) I find it works well. You do need to know the market well though, if it's TOO niche a 99p listing can backfire on you.
    • RFW
    • By RFW 6th Oct 17, 10:53 AM
    • 8,496 Posts
    • 4,950 Thanks
    RFW
    Because buyers are idiots. Case in point: two sellers (unrelated, from what I can tell) with similar feedback listed more or less the exact same thing, one starting at 99p and one starting at £99.99, the £99.99 one got no bids at all, and the 99p starter was bid up to £110+.
    Originally posted by zerog
    It's human nature to chance a bargain. It works in live auctions too. As an auctioneer you get more people interested if you start lower.

    One good tip for any live auction is sometimes to open with a higher bid, this makes the auctioneer like you and cuts out all the other bidders who want to start lower.
    .
    • NaughtiusMaximus
    • By NaughtiusMaximus 6th Oct 17, 11:42 AM
    • 523 Posts
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    NaughtiusMaximus
    One good tip for any live auction is sometimes to open with a higher bid, this makes the auctioneer like you and cuts out all the other bidders who want to start lower.
    Originally posted by RFW
    How would that help, surely the auctioneer isn't going to ignore a bid higher than yours?
    • sillygoose
    • By sillygoose 6th Oct 17, 12:50 PM
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    • 4,604 Thanks
    sillygoose
    Well my reserve is only a little over half the cash value of the item and I have now revealed that on the listing so still a bargain could be had..

    Just had my first 'could I do a buy it now price?' Message. I am not inclined to as looking at past completed sales these things always get pretty near the face value.

    Sorry I must sound such a hopeless newbie!
    • RFW
    • By RFW 6th Oct 17, 1:55 PM
    • 8,496 Posts
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    RFW
    How would that help, surely the auctioneer isn't going to ignore a bid higher than yours?
    Originally posted by NaughtiusMaximus
    I might not have been clear. If the auctioneer asks for £100 and the tendency is for other bidders is to start at £10, if you're actually willing to pay £200 you can start at £100 rather than wait for the auctioneer to drop to £10. Nothing irritates an auctioneer more than someone opening at £1 and then still bidding at £1000.

    It's a good tactic as a buyer, fortunately most people ignore it! (Not that I attend live auctions very often any more).
    .
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