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  • FIRST POST
    • mouseclick
    • By mouseclick 5th Oct 17, 12:31 AM
    • 228Posts
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    mouseclick
    Gas meter capped when I was on holiday - help!
    • #1
    • 5th Oct 17, 12:31 AM
    Gas meter capped when I was on holiday - help! 5th Oct 17 at 12:31 AM
    Hello.

    I own my own house, and I have a gas fire and a boiler. I thought to take on a lodger to save money, and I thought it prudent to get a "Landlord's certificate", even though I don't think I legally need one for a lodger, because the house belonged to my parents, and I had no idea when the old but extremely reliable boiler was last serviced. I knew the living room fire smelled, so I did not use it. I thought this could be disconnected, if it was faulty.

    I phoned a gas engineer in my local newspaper. He failed to turn up on the agreed day of the appointment, because he said his bank account was hacked, and he had to deal with the problem. So we arranged that a neighbour would be present when I was away for a week, as this was the only time he could make it. I was to be charged £50, and, without telling the engineer, I left a further £50 with the neighbour in case work was needed. Any more and I was to be phoned to authorise. That was what I said to my neighbour.

    On the day the test was due, there were no phone calls, so I assumed all was OK. Several days later I phoned my neighbour, who told me that "everything was wrong". Then, about a week later the engineer phoned me, thinking I was home. He claimed he had saved my life. He said he would give me the details when I return.

    So, return I did, at 02:30am on Tuesday morning, after 12 hours travelling. My house was cold, so I went to turn on the heating. The pump had been left on, I could hear it, but all was icy cold. There were "do not use" notices on the boiler and gas fire. The gas fire was also partly disassembled, with the pipe underneath removed, the electric cable to the igniter removed, and the heat switch removed. Other parts were not screwed up, and the covers were loose.

    In the kitchen, the boiler cover was removed, and there was no pilot light. I tried to light it, but it wouldn't start.

    Then I saw the gas meter was off. I thought to turn it on would be dangerous, as the pipe to the fire was removed. I did try it instantaneously, preparing to turn it off, but I heard no gas. So, it stayed off.

    The next morning, still tired, very cold, and by now quite upset, I phoned the engineer to ask what is going on. He said he had to "cap" the meter because both appliances were dangerous. So, I was left with no gas, and a cold house, instead of a serviced boiler (I was told it would get a clean for the £50).

    It was suggested that I would have to have a new boiler because of the proximity of the flue to the window, unless the window was "hermetically sealed", I was also told that the fire was the most dangerous he had seen, and he had put pictures on Facebook. However, he had not contacted me, even though I had given him my email address.

    He said he had made two attempts to contact me and failed, but I had no missed calls, and my phone was in a strong signal area at all times.

    I said I didn't have the money. He said he was obliged to cap the gas meter, because both appliances were dangerous. The boiler, because it was installed under the old regs, and the balanced flue is now too close to a window, which he says was not sealing or closing fully. The fire, because the backplate was fixed with duct tape, which had burned, and also because he found a hairline crack in the burner.

    The notices were marked "responsible person not present" and signed by the engineer. There was no address for the gas engineer, and no receipt or invoice was left, or any description of work done. I checked the engineer's advert, no address on that, just a mobile number. Even the gassaferegister.co.uk website does not have an address, when I enter the registration number. It has just the business name, and the areas of work covered.

    I am at a loss as what to do. A potential source of income has turned into a financial nightmare. I accept there are problems, but the engineer is now non responsive.

    As it was disconnected, I removed the gas fire from the wall, and I saw the cracked burner, and I priced a new one online - £55. Fixing this would be OK for me, and the tape and backplate are easy to fix. Or, B&Q have new gas fires for £148, less my Diamond Club discount. But I am getting no response from the engineer, perhaps because I cannot afford to invest in a new boiler?

    I have tentatively asked other fitters to look at it, but they are not interested, because it is a busy time of the year. Ideally, it would be good if the original engineer would quote me to have the fire fixed. This would then "take the heat" off fixing the boiler (pardon the pun).

    Fortunately, I have a fan heater, and right now, an electric blanket.

    Can anyone suggest a course of action please? My main concern is to get heat into the house for the winter.

    Thanks in anticipation
    Last edited by mouseclick; 05-10-2017 at 12:51 AM.
Page 1
    • House Martin
    • By House Martin 5th Oct 17, 8:42 AM
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    House Martin
    • #2
    • 5th Oct 17, 8:42 AM
    • #2
    • 5th Oct 17, 8:42 AM
    We had an old 25 year old Gloworm boiler with a pilot light which had never been serviced in 10 years. The flame was a bit yellow. A gas fitter took one look at it and was nt interested in improving it , he just wanted to fit a new boiler citing that it had a "faulty gas valve " which is now obsolete.
    The gas valve was nt obsolete and after a 2 minute search on the internet, I found a new one at £120 was available, if it was at all needed..which it was nt .
    I found an older, honest gas fitter who just said it needs a "good service ".Took off the front cover , got out his wire brush and hoover and after 15 minutes brushing at the rusty looking heat exchangers he did a CO2 test on the flue on the outside wall and it then passed with flying colours and all traces of yellow in the burner flame was gone.
    He explained that most gas fitters idea of a service is to whip out the CO2 tester and check the flue. If its a negative, they slap a notice on the gas meter, condemn the boiler, and turn off the gas. This one went a step further and put in a cap. I m not sure he had permission to go that far .
    They only want to sell you a brand new rubbish boiler full of circuit boards to end the life of a pilot light which uses approx £60 worth of gas a year. with a lifetime of between 6 to 10 years costing £1200 with another £1500 to fit the thing.
    You have to find an honest gas man not a cheating con man with pound signs in the eyes. Don t give up on the old boiler just yet but get someone qualified to get out the wire brush and hoover and clean out the years of rust, then have another CO2 test .Employ a gas safe engineer now ONLY to do a service on the boiler and test it again.
    My gas man charged me £85 .He also checked the gas fire for the flue strength with a smoke stick held at a certain angle in the flue, which it passed.The gas fire we had was rarely used though but was just there as a back up for a complete boiler failure..
    P.S. you can light the pilot light manually if the auto light has failed, but dont try it till you get the boiler serviced properly and CO2 checked.
    Last edited by House Martin; 05-10-2017 at 9:42 AM.
    • elsien
    • By elsien 5th Oct 17, 8:47 AM
    • 15,419 Posts
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    elsien
    • #3
    • 5th Oct 17, 8:47 AM
    • #3
    • 5th Oct 17, 8:47 AM
    So you don't trust the gas fitter who came out, but you want him to quote you to come back and do repairs?
    I'd carry on looking for someone else if I had your reservations about what's happened so far. In the meantime, get a electric radiator as a short term fix?
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • mouseclick
    • By mouseclick 5th Oct 17, 9:07 PM
    • 228 Posts
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    mouseclick
    • #4
    • 5th Oct 17, 9:07 PM
    • #4
    • 5th Oct 17, 9:07 PM
    So you don't trust the gas fitter who came out, but you want him to quote you to come back and do repairs?
    I'd carry on looking for someone else if I had your reservations about what's happened so far. In the meantime, get a electric radiator as a short term fix?
    Originally posted by elsien
    Got an electric radiator, but the house is still a bit damp. He's coming back on Monday to do a quote. I will have a friend here, to calm things down. No work will be done unless a price is agreed and assurances given. He capped it, he can uncap it, and explain himself to me. The boiler can be dealt with at a later date. Bug generally, I agree, the problem is, at this time of the year, I can't get anyone. And probably this is why heating engineers can get away with bad customer services. Things need to change.
    • mouseclick
    • By mouseclick 5th Oct 17, 9:12 PM
    • 228 Posts
    • 87 Thanks
    mouseclick
    • #5
    • 5th Oct 17, 9:12 PM
    • #5
    • 5th Oct 17, 9:12 PM
    He explained that most gas fitters idea of a service is to whip out the CO2 tester and check the flue. If its a negative, they slap a notice on the gas meter, condemn the boiler, and turn off the gas. This one went a step further and put in a cap. I m not sure he had permission to go that far .
    Originally posted by House Martin
    Beautifully written House Martin I couldn't agree more. I think you mean the CO tester though (Carbon monoxide, not dioxide). I agree with all of your email in fact, but especially this bit.

    He's coming back on Monday to fix the Baxi gas fire, as per my previous post. At this time of year, he is the only one available. I can survive the winter with a gas fire only. This will give me time to get someone to service the boiler who lives nearby, and who I can trust. Thanks
    Last edited by mouseclick; 06-10-2017 at 6:21 AM. Reason: mentioned CO2 error should read CO
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 6th Oct 17, 8:28 AM
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    Norman Castle
    • #6
    • 6th Oct 17, 8:28 AM
    • #6
    • 6th Oct 17, 8:28 AM
    It was suggested that I would have to have a new boiler because of the proximity of the flue to the window, unless the window was "hermetically sealed",
    How difficult is it to hermetically seal the window? Sealant is cheap.
    Last edited by Norman Castle; 06-10-2017 at 8:31 AM.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.
    • mouseclick
    • By mouseclick 6th Oct 17, 9:11 AM
    • 228 Posts
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    mouseclick
    • #7
    • 6th Oct 17, 9:11 AM
    • #7
    • 6th Oct 17, 9:11 AM
    How difficult is it to hermetically seal the window? Sealant is cheap.
    Originally posted by Norman Castle
    To be honest Norman, I don't think it needs sealing. As House Martin has said, when it is serviced, the CO levels will come down. My neighbour explained to me the gas fitter warned of certain conditions, namely that if I was washing dishes with the kitchen window open, and the hot water full on, I could die. That is why it was necessary to cap the meter, in case I met my death in this way.

    But in reality I have a dishwasher, and I never use the kitchen hot water, nor do I open the window, because there is a door next to it. Plus I think he put the CO meter just inside the window when it was open (so my neighbour tells me), whereas my closest possible standing position is about one metre away from the window, gven the thickness of the worktop and windowsill. And I have a CO meter in the kitchen, and it has never gone off zero, ever.

    The main issue appears to be that there are stains inside the double glazing panel, which are the result of condensation. These are said to be "fumes". But actually these stains have been there for 25 years, and are the result of condensation and a bit of rust or calcium, on a window that is quite exposed to the elements. The same happens with a bedroom window, some 10 - 12 metres from the balanced flue. Although it looks dramatic, these are not fumes. They are simply stains on the glass. I do not think a test was done when the window was closed. So the seepage is only hypothetical, I think.

    There is no evidence at all to suggest that any fumes are entering the house with the window closed, so I see no point at all in sealing it.
    Last edited by mouseclick; 06-10-2017 at 7:59 PM.
    • rtho782
    • By rtho782 6th Oct 17, 10:49 AM
    • 1,036 Posts
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    rtho782
    • #8
    • 6th Oct 17, 10:49 AM
    • #8
    • 6th Oct 17, 10:49 AM
    I'm pretty sure with Gas, he is allowed to (possibly even required to) cap the meter and prevent it being used if it is unsafe.
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    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 6th Oct 17, 11:03 AM
    • 6,393 Posts
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    Norman Castle
    • #9
    • 6th Oct 17, 11:03 AM
    • #9
    • 6th Oct 17, 11:03 AM
    nor do I open the window, because there is a door next to it.

    There is no evidence at all to suggest that any fumes are entering the house with the window closed, so I see no point at all in sealing it.
    Originally posted by mouseclick
    If you never open it sealing it with clear mastic should hopefully meet safety requirements, ask a gas fitter first, and can be easily removed if or when the boiler or flue is changed.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.
    • mouseclick
    • By mouseclick 6th Oct 17, 11:13 AM
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    mouseclick
    I'm pretty sure with Gas, he is allowed to (possibly even required to) cap the meter and prevent it being used if it is unsafe.
    Originally posted by rtho782
    I believe "allowed to", but with the consent of a "responsible person". That was my neighbour. He says he was not asked, and was unaware the meter was capped. The plan, as agreed, was the boiler would be serviced and the fee I paid would cover that. If the boiler was cleaned, I am certain the CO would come down. However, total time spent was about 40 minutes on both appliances.

    I was aware there was a problem with the gas fire, namely the backplate, but I said it was OK to disconnect this, because it was not used. It turns out it had a hairline crack in the burner. This is the cheapest to fix. If the agreed procedure was followed, I would have been phoned, and given permission for the fix, to the gas fire. That at least would have left heat in the house, and it was the cheapest option.

    There is also the question of strictness. As well as being not local (despite advertising in the local "Up my street" newspaper), the engineer said he was strict, but only to my neighbour. The impression I got on the phone was that an Ideal Mexico boiler keeps going on and on, and parts are still available, .i.e. it seemed the engineer was sympathetic to me. The older boilers are not very efficient, that's all, but against that, they are more reliable than newer hi-tech ones, and seem to have a longer life. The Gas Safe Register people acknowledged that there was differing degrees of strictness with engineers. Everyone knows this is true.

    The ideal situation for me would have been to service the Mexico, then test, not test before, as House Martin mentioned. If that was fine, disconnect the fire, as it is the cheapest solution.

    I phoned the Gas Safe Register, because this engineer does not have his address or email there. Others do. If Gas Safe Register wants to be better than Corgi, I hope they insist that engineers put their details there. There are other legal requirements to transacting over the Telephone too, I should have got the business address that way.

    Now that I am wiser, I will look for a local engineer to service the boiler, do whatever is required, then test. But I am not going to install a new boiler. I simply don't have the money.

    I would have been better off not calling in a Gas Safe Engineer. I have my own CO meters, and a sense of responsibility.
    Last edited by mouseclick; 06-10-2017 at 11:16 AM.
    • mouseclick
    • By mouseclick 6th Oct 17, 11:38 AM
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    mouseclick
    As a general comment, I see a problem here, in general, with Capita Gas Registration And Ancillary Services Limited trading as Gas Safe Register. Namely, it is in the interests of everyone concerned to condemn appliances too quickly, as it generates income for those in the trade. I seriously think I would not have died, washing the dishes, with the window open. I think the dangers of death by hypothermia are far greater. According to this page, a freedom of information request (second page of the low quality PDF), there were 24 deaths at home in 2015. And according to this article, the death toll for hypothermia in 2015 may have been around 40,000. So people are 1600 times more likely do die from hypothermia at home than CO poisoning, I am in a vulnerable group for hypothermia, namely over 60, and without heating. I am very cold now. For example, perhaps Gas Safe engineers should be trained to balance the relative risks involved when cutting off people's gas, versus simply warning them? With a warning, they have choice. When you cap a meter, there is no choice. You get cold.

    What percentage of people, I wonder, who were affected by the gas safety rules, either by having their supply cut off, or by not being able to replace condemned equipment, died from hypothermia? Now that would be an interesting statistic to know.
    Last edited by mouseclick; 06-10-2017 at 11:45 AM.
    • rtho782
    • By rtho782 6th Oct 17, 12:42 PM
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    rtho782
    I bet if you look at only people with faulty appliances emitting carbon monoxide the risks of death due to carbon monoxide poisoning are far greater than the risk of death due to hypothermia, given that it's not exactly the depths of winter, and coats and electric fires exist.

    You should not have a choice to decide to ignore safety warnings with gas. Your house catching fire would likely impact others, as would CO poisoning if, for example, one of your visitors died on visiting your home.

    CO poisoning is insidious and often not really noticed until it's too late.

    If you don't want to replace your boiler, get someone else to fix it, they can then remove the meter cap. In the mean time it must not be used.

    If you don't want to repair your boiler, get an electric fire.

    Had he not capped the meter off, what would you have done, turned it back on and used it anyway, then gotten a lodger and murdered them with carbon monoxide?
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    • Hengus
    • By Hengus 6th Oct 17, 12:51 PM
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    Hengus
    If your lodger pays you any money then, for gas safety purposes, the law treats you as a Landlord, and you must have an annual Gas Safety Certificate (source Health and Safety Executive website).

    I know that you were hoping that the process was nothing more than a formality but, with respect, you are making far too much of this situation. The engineer is only interested in making sure that your gas appliances, flues etc comply with relevant safety legislation. He may have been over zealous so the answer is to call in another engineer in to carry out a further safety check. If he is happy, then he will leave everything connected and he will issue a Gas Safety Certificate. At that point, you decide whether you have a case against the original engineer.

    It is worth remembering that:

    Landlords' responsibility for gas safety.

    'As a landlord, you are legally responsible for the safety of your tenants in relation to gas safety. By law you must: Repair and maintain gas pipework, flues and appliances in safe condition.'

    It is not up to the homeowner to determine what is and what isn't safe: that is a matter of legislation. For what it is worth, a valid Gas Safety Certificate provides you with a measure of legal protection from a third-party claim for negligence.
    • mouseclick
    • By mouseclick 6th Oct 17, 4:57 PM
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    mouseclick
    Just to clarify, for the benefit of rtho782 and Hengus, I am NOT A LANDLORD. Only I live here. Please read the thread. And the lodger option is clearly off now. It would have only been for maybe 6 months to a year, as I am eventually moving, and need the extra money to buy a house. I acted responsibly enough to get a test even though I did not need one. And I cannot use the appliances because the gas meter is capped.

    What I object to is THE ENGINEER, WHO HAD MY EMAIL ADDRESS AND PHONE, DID NOT NOTIFY MR OF THE PROBLEM UNTIL A WEEK AFTER THE TEST. He could have so easily texted me. He told my neighbour who was here that he would tell me, to leave it to him, but he didn't. And his instructions from me were to service the boiler and test. I left extra money in case there was need for any work. He said this would be easy., and did ot mention there could be problems like this.

    Instead of informing me of the severity of the problem, he posted pictures of the inside of my house to his Facebook site, presumably for his own benefit, and only told me the day after I got back. It was not nice to find I had no heating at all, when returning to a cold house at 2:30am, after travelling for 12 hours. There was no notice left even saying the gas meter was capped. I had never even heard of this when he told me, and the gas fire in my living room was partly dismantled, and away from the wall.

    If I had been told when on a weeks holiday, the appliances could have been fixed. There is no question of murdering people rtho82. I am the only one at risk here, if anyone is. And even if I knowledgeably allowed someone else to live here, which I am, not, it would only be manslaughter, in an extreme case o murder could never be justified, as that is with intent. But bear in mind that only 24 people year die at home from this, out of 60 million. The boiler just needs a good clean, as House Martin says. This will be done as soon as I get an engineer who is available. Now they are all flat out busy, that is why my only option is to call the original one back. I figured a Landlord certificate would be useful to have. I got one when I lived in London. It was easy to get. It was given AFTER the boiler was cleaned.

    In future, I will find a local engineer who puts his address on his documents, and give bills, and turns up on the day he is supposed to, not when I am away. And one who is prepared to work with older boilers, which, although less efficient, are more reliable.

    And I hope is clear that I don't want to spend money on a new boiler, as whoever buys this house is going to completely redecorate it and fit new. So I can survive with a gas fire only, and an immersion heater. However, it would be nice if the Ideal Mexico can be cleaned. The pilot light has not gone out in about 10 years. It is a reliable old slogger
    Last edited by mouseclick; 06-10-2017 at 6:24 PM. Reason: stuff added
    • mouseclick
    • By mouseclick 6th Oct 17, 5:25 PM
    • 228 Posts
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    mouseclick
    It is not up to the homeowner to determine what is and what isn't safe: that is a matter of legislation.
    Originally posted by Hengus
    I disagree, I believe there is no obligation on me to service my equipment. Sure, it is a good idea, but as a private homeowner, I am not aware of any legislation. Same with electric. I think the rules govern installation, and for this, qualified tradesmen are required.
    Last edited by mouseclick; 06-10-2017 at 5:28 PM.
    • Hengus
    • By Hengus 6th Oct 17, 6:32 PM
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    Hengus
    I disagree, I believe there is no obligation on me to service my equipment. Sure, it is a good idea, but as a private homeowner, I am not aware of any legislation. Same with electric. I think the rules govern installation, and for this, qualified tradesmen are required.
    Originally posted by mouseclick
    You are correct, you are under no legal obligation to have your boiler serviced, flue checked etc as a homeowner. However, you made the correct and responsible decision to request a Gas Safety Check because you were thinking of getting a lodger. The check was carried out by a Gas Safe Registered engineer who then has a statutory duty to check your system (appliances, flues etc) in accordance with Technical Bulletin 1/2015. What you cannot do is turn the clock back. A cap has been inserted and your home will probably have been reported under RIDDOR. No Gas Safe Registered engineer will risk his/her reputation and livelihood, and turn your system back on unless he/she is satisfied that the system is now Gas Safe. The same situation could occur if an engineer was fitting a smart meter and became concerned about the position of the gas meter or routing of the supply pipe.

    I know that you are upset with the engineer but it is clear that his actions were inline with the following paragraph in the Technical Bulletin:

    6.1 Immediately Dangerous (ID) appliances/installations An ID appliance/installation is one which is an immediate danger to life or property. In general these will be RIDDOR reportable – see clause 8.3. Broadly, these will be appliances/installations that fail tightness tests, appliances that fail spillage tests or appliances which have serious flueing and/or ventilation and/or combustion deficiencies. With the gas user/responsible person’s agreement, the engineer shall make every endeavour to rectify the situation(s) and make the appliance/installation safe to use at the time of the visit. Where this is not possible, the following actions must be taken: a) Explain to the gas user/responsible person • that the appliance/installation is Immediately Dangerous • why the appliance/installation is Immediately Dangerous • that the appliance/installation MUST NOT BE USED • that it must be disconnected from the gas supply until the situation has been rectified and that further use would contravene the law e.g. GSIUR Regulation 34. b) With the permission of the gas user/responsible person, immediately DISCONNECT AND SEAL the gas supply to the appliance/installation with an appropriate fitting. If the gas user/responsible person refuses to allow disconnection, endeavour to turn off the appliance/installation and; i. For natural gas, make immediate contact with the Gas Emergency Contact Centre and obtain a job reference number from the operator and the time of the contact for record purposes (see Note 6 below). ii. For LPG, make immediate contact with the Gas Supplier. In both cases explain the course of action taken and the reason why the situation is considered to be Immediately Dangerous. – see contact details of Gas Emergency Service Providers and Gas Suppliers – in Table 2 of this Procedure) c) Where the gas user/responsible person is not present, it is recommended that the appliance/installation be DISCONNECTED AND SEALED from the gas supply with an appropriate fitting. However, in non-domestic premises see clause 5.6 and Note 5.

    You obviously have the right to question the engineer about his actions.
    Last edited by Hengus; 06-10-2017 at 6:42 PM.
    • badmemory
    • By badmemory 6th Oct 17, 6:49 PM
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    badmemory
    Don't trust a gas safe engineer. It is a bought & paid for qualification which may mean nothing other than they had enough cash to pay for it. I won't go into the gas safe engineer who fitted my boiler which then got condemned at its first service under a year later when supposedly under warranty & could have killed us! You don't want to know how much it cost me to get that put right.
    • IAmWales
    • By IAmWales 6th Oct 17, 7:06 PM
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    IAmWales
    Don't trust a gas safe engineer. It is a bought & paid for qualification which may mean nothing other than they had enough cash to pay for it. I won't go into the gas safe engineer who fitted my boiler which then got condemned at its first service under a year later when supposedly under warranty & could have killed us! You don't want to know how much it cost me to get that put right.
    Originally posted by badmemory
    By law only a Gas Safe engine can work on gas appliances. Who else do you suggest OP gets to sort their boiler?

    Not sure what you mean by a bought and paid for qualification? Engineers must be ACS/ NVQ qualified before they can apply for registration.

    Don't judge a whole profession based on one bad experience. Most are extremely capable, even when having to deal with difficult customers like the OP.
    • mouseclick
    • By mouseclick 6th Oct 17, 7:53 PM
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    mouseclick
    Most are extremely capable, even when having to deal with difficult customers like the OP.
    Originally posted by IAmWales
    Difficult, yes, because I decided on a lodger based to try and resolve some financial issues, now I regret that. And because I do not feel good, because I have no heating etc. Maybe also the standards are stricter for landlords, and it was wrong to ask for a certificate. I thought the standards would be equal. I wish the engineer had turned up on the day promised, or had phoned me, then I don't think there would have been any misunderstanding. I am not a landlord. I am the only one who lives here, and I cannot afford a new boiler etc. He may not have realised that.

    On the subject of engineers, when you quoted badmemory, I did get a sympathetic ear from someone from Gas Safe, . The engineer himself did say to my neighbour he liked to be strict. But, as I said, there will be a second chance on Monday, to resolve the issue. And for future times. I have now found a neighbour who is an engineer with a good local reputation.

    Doubtless people in the Industry will defend their position, but not all plumbers and heating engineers are angels, as I think was the implication by House Martin. They want to make money. And Gas Safe is run by Capita Gas Registration And Ancillary Services Limited. Limited companies must primarily serve their shareholders.
    Last edited by mouseclick; 06-10-2017 at 8:16 PM.
    • trickytree1963
    • By trickytree1963 6th Oct 17, 9:12 PM
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    trickytree1963
    Difficult, yes, because I decided on a lodger based to try and resolve some financial issues, now I regret that. And because I do not feel good, because I have no heating etc. Maybe also the standards are stricter for landlords, and it was wrong to ask for a certificate. I thought the standards would be equal. I wish the engineer had turned up on the day promised, or had phoned me, then I don't think there would have been any misunderstanding. I am not a landlord. I am the only one who lives here, and I cannot afford a new boiler etc. He may not have realised that.

    On the subject of engineers, when you quoted badmemory, I did get a sympathetic ear from someone from Gas Safe, . The engineer himself did say to my neighbour he liked to be strict. But, as I said, there will be a second chance on Monday, to resolve the issue. And for future times. I have now found a neighbour who is an engineer with a good local reputation.

    Doubtless people in the Industry will defend their position, but not all plumbers and heating engineers are angels, as I think was the implication by House Martin. They want to make money. And Gas Safe is run by Capita Gas Registration And Ancillary Services Limited. Limited companies must primarily serve their shareholders.
    Originally posted by mouseclick
    Gas Safe Register is run by Capita on behalf of the H & SE . You really need to get it out of your head that its a money making scheme

    "The purpose of the Gas Safe Register is to protect the public from unsafe gas work. It does this in two main ways, operation of the Register itself e.g. ensuring that the list of competent and qualified to carry out work is accurate and up-to-date, inspecting the work of Gas Safe registered engineers and investigating reports of illegal gas work. The second area is to conduct public awareness campaigns to raise awareness of gas safety issues."
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