Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • ben501
    • By ben501 4th Oct 17, 11:10 AM
    • 216Posts
    • 304Thanks
    ben501
    Best way to repair underfloor (tile) bathroom plumbing?
    • #1
    • 4th Oct 17, 11:10 AM
    Best way to repair underfloor (tile) bathroom plumbing? 4th Oct 17 at 11:10 AM
    I came downstairs this morning to find a puddle on the kitchen floor. Once Iíd woken up enough to investigate, I decided itís from the bathroom sink drainpipe. This is based solely on its position compared to the place where the water came through the ceiling.

    The bathroom floor is tiled in all exposed areas, so checking under the floorboards wonít be easy. Add to that, I think the tiles were fitted on ply, which was laid on top of the existing floorboards.
    The sides of the bath are also tiled, so I canít just remove the bath panel to try and look underneath either.

    Before I start contacting plumbers and listening the sharp intake of breath, does anyone have experience or advice on the subject, in particular the best, or most likely route to fixing it?
    I have heard suggestions that it can be easier to access the plumbing by making a hole in the ceiling below, rather than lifting tiles. (Artex ceiling, so probably not that easy to patch & match either)

    Another thought, due to my inexperience, Is this likely to be something I can claim for through my insurance? I have combined building/contents, and the premium even after claiming, is likely to be less that the cost of repairs.
    The bathroom was only fitted about 12 months ago, so I will be contacting the fitter, but Iíve no idea if this would be covered under any warranty.
Page 1
    • martinsurrey
    • By martinsurrey 4th Oct 17, 11:59 AM
    • 3,225 Posts
    • 3,927 Thanks
    martinsurrey
    • #2
    • 4th Oct 17, 11:59 AM
    • #2
    • 4th Oct 17, 11:59 AM
    I came downstairs this morning to find a puddle on the kitchen floor. Once Iíd woken up enough to investigate, I decided itís from the bathroom sink drainpipe. This is based solely on its position compared to the place where the water came through the ceiling.

    The bathroom floor is tiled in all exposed areas, so checking under the floorboards wonít be easy. Add to that, I think the tiles were fitted on ply, which was laid on top of the existing floorboards.
    The sides of the bath are also tiled, so I canít just remove the bath panel to try and look underneath either.

    Before I start contacting plumbers and listening the sharp intake of breath, does anyone have experience or advice on the subject, in particular the best, or most likely route to fixing it?
    I have heard suggestions that it can be easier to access the plumbing by making a hole in the ceiling below, rather than lifting tiles. (Artex ceiling, so probably not that easy to patch & match either)

    Another thought, due to my inexperience, Is this likely to be something I can claim for through my insurance? I have combined building/contents, and the premium even after claiming, is likely to be less that the cost of repairs.
    The bathroom was only fitted about 12 months ago, so I will be contacting the fitter, but Iíve no idea if this would be covered under any warranty.
    Originally posted by ben501
    you are making a big assumption,

    If the floor was over boarded, the leak could be anywhere, and just coming through a hole in the boarding or down the joins.

    no easy fix I'm afraid, if you go through from below, you'll need to replace a ceiling and its a pigs job getting through ceiling, then floor boards, then ply to find the leak, but from above, you'll be repacing floor and side panel.

    I suggest getting it done from above, and when everything goes back in get it done properly, with access points, that way if it happens again its an easy fix.
    • maninthestreet
    • By maninthestreet 4th Oct 17, 8:07 PM
    • 15,158 Posts
    • 13,586 Thanks
    maninthestreet
    • #3
    • 4th Oct 17, 8:07 PM
    • #3
    • 4th Oct 17, 8:07 PM
    I had a similar problem a few months ago - the artex may contain asbestos.
    You will need to get it tested - this cost me £108. Mine did have asbestos, and it cost me almost £500 for an asbestos specialist to cut a 1 foot square hole in it.
    "You were only supposed to blow the bl**dy doors off!!"
    • ben501
    • By ben501 4th Oct 17, 10:09 PM
    • 216 Posts
    • 304 Thanks
    ben501
    • #4
    • 4th Oct 17, 10:09 PM
    • #4
    • 4th Oct 17, 10:09 PM
    Curiosity got the better of me. Having placed a bucket under the hole, I tried turning the bathroom tap on to see if it stated dripping again, but nothing.



    Not content to just leave it alone, I got a screwdriver, reached up and poked around. Water then started to trickle out. Something must be plugging the hole, and last night the pressure got too great, some leaked through.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

881Posts Today

5,675Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • RT @bearface83: @MartinSLewis check out the @Missguided new 60% off offer. Upping the cost of items almost double to make us think it?s a?

  • RT @efitzpat: Thank you SO SO much @MartinSLewis for your Student Loans refund advice! I just got a grand refunded right before Xmas! Whoop?

  • Have a lovely weekend folks. Don't do anything (fiscally) that I wouldn't do!

  • Follow Martin