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  • FIRST POST
    • plush
    • By plush 20th Sep 17, 2:41 PM
    • 39Posts
    • 147Thanks
    plush
    early 40s and not fabulous at all
    • #1
    • 20th Sep 17, 2:41 PM
    early 40s and not fabulous at all 20th Sep 17 at 2:41 PM
    I'm not entirely sure how I ended up here... I don't mean the forum, I used it several years ago when I bought my flat and it's an invaluable resource. I mean with £14K credit card debt and nothing to show for it, and virtually no savings. Also single, mildly depressed and 15-20 lbs heavier than I should probably be.

    I don't understand why I'm unable to leave this vicious circle. I'm healthy - physically anyway - I have a healthy and happy child, family, some friends, a decent job, my own flat (mortgaged, but I'd pay more if I were to rent it, we're in greater London). Compared to many people I don't have big problems, yet I feel like s__t most of the time, don't sleep well, and plus I've started to feel really bad about the level of debt. last but not least, feeling super lonely and discouraged about dating and finding and partner.

    So I live well above my means even though my income is not that bad. Although I have been able to cut some bills, I'm lacking willpower when it comes to everyday spending. I tried to put my credit cards away but I failed. I go on too many holidays. I spend too much money on everything: clothes, shoes, haircuts, household things, concerts, theatre, etc. And I definitely spend too much money on food, on both groceries and eating out.

    I thought it would be a good idea to write here and check in once in a while, because I don't talk to anybody about my money issues. No one knows I'm in so much debt, not even my parents. And I should probably talk to my GP about my depression, as it's now affecting my general well being - I'm not sleeping enough, I'm eating too much in the evenings and I constantly feel tired and grumpy. I also stopped going to my weekly yoga class in an attempt to reduce spending, but that was probably a stupid move...

    So there. I need any help and advice I can get. And a big kick in the a__e...

    Thank you for reading.

    This Forum tip was included in MoneySavingExpert.com's weekly email!
    Last edited by MSE Andrea; 04-10-2017 at 9:30 AM.
Page 5
    • Plush
    • By Plush 6th Oct 17, 7:10 PM
    • 76 Posts
    • 185 Thanks
    Plush
    Hi Plush
    Are you tired / Fed up / need cheering up / feel you deserve it...... etc etc
    Originally posted by 117pauline
    All of the above. I know that I have it easier than others. I'm healthy (some issues but nothing major - hypothyroidism that is under control, taking pills), I have a wonderful child, I have a job that pays decently, a roof above my head, and family and friends. I do have debt but I'm not in a situation that cannot be solved. Yet, I feel like I'm drowning and things are going downhill, and it's not just a a feeling, my credit card balance went from £0 to £14K in several years and I seem to be unable to reduce it. I even thought about adding the debt to the mortgage. (or selling to pay debt and get something smaller).

    And no, I'm not meal planning, in fact I'm quite bad about wasting food...

    On budgeting and spending, I manage to not spend for a couple of weeks then it all comes back. Lack of willpower, it's called.

    Glad you came back, Plush! I know it's not easy on your own, trying to do all of the things!
    Make sure you have time for you, to do something you enjoy. Or to just not do anything at all
    Coming from a similar-ish situation, I've found some of the mindfulness stuff which is out there quite useful, may be worth a look?
    Originally posted by Tea&Kittens
    Thanks. Will go back to yoga, it was silly of me to stop that. I'm trying to find a cheaper class though, and one that fits my schedule.
    • happymo
    • By happymo 6th Oct 17, 10:51 PM
    • 7 Posts
    • 18 Thanks
    happymo
    Following your thread with interest. Just a suggestion about food shopping. If your nearest Al dee is not that far away, with the money you save a taxi fare would still leave you in pocket. And I find shopping there is quicker because there is not so much choice, although I get most of what I want, so it doesn't take so long. I top up at Waitrose weekly but only spend about £10 extra there. For two of us our monthly bill is about £150 and we eat very well!


    Good luck...I'm sure you will get there!
    • Plush
    • By Plush 9th Oct 17, 4:02 PM
    • 76 Posts
    • 185 Thanks
    Plush
    Thanks @happymo £150 sounds good - are cleaning products and basic toiletries included in that?

    Not much to update, weekend was quiet with very low spending. We have family visiting from overseas this coming weekend, so that means double grocery shopping bill... apart from groceries there isn't any planned spend until next pay date. I do need to service the boiler and might do it this month if my Halifax bank account stays in green in 2 weeks from now. We also have passport renewal fees that need to be paid as soon as the application is processed, so it's either that or the boiler this month.

    I've been good about not using the Barclaycard, in fact the only spend was Oyster auto top-up, which I paid immediately from the bank account. It's so hard psychologically to destroy that card, I keep thinking what if I need it for emergencies... I have now changed the Oyster auto top up to my Halifax bank card and I believe I removed it from all online shopping accounts. I have been leaving it at home but not every day. Even that seems hard, I just can't get myself to do it. I guess the light bulb is still flickering.

    Weight-wise I lost about 1-2 kg, not sure how, as I haven't done much to get there. I haven't been out in a while so I guess not drinking alcohol at all helps the body process food faster? In any case, I'd love to lose another 4-5kg if I can.

    Dating-wise - nothing. Talked to some guys on OKC but haven't really gotten anywhere, not even to the point of exchanging phone numbers. Another Christmas on our own I guess, can#t afford to fly overseas to be with family (although my parents might come over, not decided yet). I'd love to find someone with kids, to have a bigger family - I grew up in a big family and it was wonderful (still is).

    That's all for now.
    • happymo
    • By happymo 9th Oct 17, 9:39 PM
    • 7 Posts
    • 18 Thanks
    happymo
    Yes that includes everything. Admit we are not in debt and our mortgage is paid off, but we prefer to spend on other things than food! We do eat well, eat out probable once a fortnight. I cook mainly from scratch. Best wishes.
    • Little Miss Winner
    • By Little Miss Winner 10th Oct 17, 1:09 AM
    • 3,966 Posts
    • 135,920 Thanks
    Little Miss Winner
    Good luck with your diary - I have subscribed

    Im also a big fan of Aldi - you can easily cut your grocery bill in half.

    You say you are lucky enough to have lots of friends and family - are they all nearby? Do any friends / work colleagues shop at Aldi could you catch a lift back if anyones going? You really would save a fortune.

    Some of my fave best Aldi buys (not including food) are the Washing Gel 21 washes (laundry) which is £1.75. Creme Bubble Bath 49p, Deodarant 79p. Washing up liquid 59p

    I also used to be a bit of a supermarket name snob, Persil, Dove, Radox, Fairy etc etc..... till I realised how much we are all being totally ripped off.

    Send lots of positive vibes to you xx
    • EssexHebridean
    • By EssexHebridean 10th Oct 17, 1:23 PM
    • 8,214 Posts
    • 43,471 Thanks
    EssexHebridean
    Another member of the "£150 a month for food, cleaning & basic toiletries club" here - we buy very little supermarket meat preferring to shop from farmers markets or direct from the supplier, but a LOT of seasonal fruit & veg from the cheap shops! Love the "super 6" and "Pick of the Week" type offers and frequently build my meal plan around whatever is the cheapest on the veg front.

    Almost the only branded stuff we now buy routinely is Fairy (only on offer but by FAR the best in our water) WU liquid, Nescafe coffee (the ordinary stuff, not the gold stuff) as MrEH pulls faces if I give him anything else, and washing powder or liquid as I love the smell of Bold or Surf and never find the own brand stuff as nice. If we were skint that last would go in favour of a discount brand though. Oh Branston beans through choice - but again, on offer only. On other things I'm happy to buy branded if it hits my target for price, but if it doesn't then own brand it will be.

    Plush - less alcohol might explain your weight loss all told if you've been out less than usual - there's a surprising amount of calories in that stuff!

    Oh - and stick that card in the back of a drawer and leave it there - go on, I dare you to get to the end of the week, to start with, without touching it. ()And then I'll dare you to go to the end of the month!)
    MORTGAGE FREE 30/09/2016
    Sainsbugs 0% card: 22/12/16 £1229.00/£656.45 (20/11/17)
    SOA Calculator for DFW newbies: Stoozing.com SOA Calculator
    • Tea&Kittens
    • By Tea&Kittens 10th Oct 17, 1:38 PM
    • 168 Posts
    • 635 Thanks
    Tea&Kittens
    Hi Plush
    I've been trying to do the £150 shopping thing too. For, me I think I can make it work if I properly plan meals. It does take a bit of work though!
    Weight loss as a side effect of managing finances sounds like an unexpected bonus! I'd love it for that to happen here too

    Well done on the Barclay card, sorting out all your online things and your oyster. Easy to forget about those little things isn't it, until they turn up as a transaction!
    October: NSDs 6 / 17 NSDs in a row: 1 / 5
    I started my debtfree journey on 07 September 2017: Total: £20,521 £19847
    Barclaycard: £14659 £14435 Oct 2017 HSBC Credit Card : £3112 £3012 Oct 2017
    Overdraft: 350 £0 Oct2017 MBNA : 2400
    A journey of a thousand miles starts with a single step. I'm on my way!
    • Plush
    • By Plush 11th Oct 17, 2:32 PM
    • 76 Posts
    • 185 Thanks
    Plush
    Thanks all for the tips on Aldi. It never occurred to me that I could take an Uber, it would probably be about £8. Need to investigate that one. I'm not working in half term so should be able to do it then together with DD.

    Now £150 sounds impossible for me. I'm struggling to keep it under £250 at the moment (and I'm not managing to do it, too many top ups). And DD has school lunches, not packed.

    Right. I need to plan the weekend around my family who's visiting. I already know what I'll be cooking. They aren't really interested in seeing much of London, as they've lived here before. Looks like the weather will be nice so that means long walks in our local park and perhaps alongside Thames river.

    Looking at my accounts, they are both still in green. One more bill to come out of Barclays and it will have a bit of extra left. Halifax looks healthy and also getting child benefit is coming on Monday, but it will be a miracle if I don't dip into the overdraft - with the upcoming weekend, then passport fees and/or the annual boiler service. I could possibly push the boiler service until next month by giving them a cheque dated 25th. We shall see. My debt is still at £13587 (sainsbury+barclaycard1). I was hoping to make an extra payment just before next pay day, if any ££ left in Halifax, but that is too ambitious.. let's hope I don't touch the overdraft (and Barclaycard #2! of course).

    Now the negative part. I've neglected entering some spending in the Spending Tracker app so now I have to do it all manually. My plan was to enter all spending for 1 month, evaluate, budget next month, then look at it again after a full month and so on. I keep forgetting to enter stuff and I've no excuse, the phone is on me all the time.
    • Plush
    • By Plush 11th Oct 17, 2:39 PM
    • 76 Posts
    • 185 Thanks
    Plush
    PS. No family here, they all live overseas, mostly in Europe. Well, apart from the Ex, he's still family in some sense. We have friends here, they all live in London but not close by, so we meet at eachother's houses or just go out together with kids.. Having said there is one family locally that I sometimes exchange childcare favours with. No shopping together I'm afraid, can't rely on others for this.
    • EssexHebridean
    • By EssexHebridean 11th Oct 17, 2:51 PM
    • 8,214 Posts
    • 43,471 Thanks
    EssexHebridean
    OK - step-by-step for saving money on groceries.
    1) Grab as many receipts from shopping as you can find - and analyse them to work out what are your "expensive" items as a starting point. That's as good a place as any to look at making savings to start with.
    2) Put a mark against everything you bought a brand label for - and then look to "drop a level" on them next time you shop. NEVER flag this up to other members of the household - just serve it as normal, no bells or whistles. Mostly likely it'll vanish with no comment.
    3) Choose a couple of regularly bought items to drop to "value" products on and see how they are each week. Some will be great, some will be OK, some will be so disgusting you'll laugh over that experiment for years to come.
    4) Go through your cupboards, fridge, freezer. Make 2 lists - the first is for anything you have that could probably do with being used as a priority - eggs nearing the end of their date, veg going a bit bendy, that sort of thing. The second list is for everything else - you can ignore basic condiments but anything that classifies as a "building block" to make a meal from.
    5) Taking list 1 - write a week's meal plan - remember to think about breakfasts (that might use those eggs) lunches (Cheese & coleslaw sarnie with the bendy veg?) and dinners. Your aim is to use EVERYTHING on list 1.
    6) Looking at the meal plan in conjuctions with both lists, work out what you need to buy to make those meals. You've got the eggs, but do you need a load for toast and lunchtime sandwiches? Cheese to go with the coleslaw? You get the idea. ONLY the stuff you're short of goes on the list at this point though.
    7) use your receipts, and list 1 to note any routine purchases like milk, fruit etc that are needed, and add those to the shopping list. Factor in everything you need for the week - so you won't be tempted to go back again. (An exception to this might be milk, which is heavy, but I have a plan for dealing with this...)
    8) Go shopping, and purchase ONLY the items on that list.
    9) Take it all home and eat for a week knowing that you have all you need, and that nothing will be wasted.

    If you can't manage to carry all the milk in one go then when you go back to buy more, take cash. The right amount of cash. And ONLY the right amount of cash. I appreciate carrying stuff can be tough with no car but inside London itself buses are amazingly good, and you could dig out an old rucksack/backpack to carry the heavier items in? (I do this if I walk/cycle to the supermarket).

    Would it be cheaper for DD to have packed lunches instead of school dinners? It may be that it won't if this means she just eats more of a snack in the evening, but it's worth costing up.

    Bearing in mind that you've acknowledged that you know you tend to waste food, that's such a good place to start to reduce your outgoings!
    MORTGAGE FREE 30/09/2016
    Sainsbugs 0% card: 22/12/16 £1229.00/£656.45 (20/11/17)
    SOA Calculator for DFW newbies: Stoozing.com SOA Calculator
    • Scott_Weiland
    • By Scott_Weiland 11th Oct 17, 4:31 PM
    • 659 Posts
    • 1,629 Thanks
    Scott_Weiland
    Thanks @happymo £150 sounds good - are cleaning products and basic toiletries included in that?

    Not much to update, weekend was quiet with very low spending. We have family visiting from overseas this coming weekend, so that means double grocery shopping bill... apart from groceries there isn't any planned spend until next pay date. I do need to service the boiler and might do it this month if my Halifax bank account stays in green in 2 weeks from now. We also have passport renewal fees that need to be paid as soon as the application is processed, so it's either that or the boiler this month.

    I've been good about not using the Barclaycard, in fact the only spend was Oyster auto top-up, which I paid immediately from the bank account. It's so hard psychologically to destroy that card, I keep thinking what if I need it for emergencies... I have now changed the Oyster auto top up to my Halifax bank card and I believe I removed it from all online shopping accounts. I have been leaving it at home but not every day. Even that seems hard, I just can't get myself to do it. I guess the light bulb is still flickering.

    Weight-wise I lost about 1-2 kg, not sure how, as I haven't done much to get there. I haven't been out in a while so I guess not drinking alcohol at all helps the body process food faster? In any case, I'd love to lose another 4-5kg if I can.

    Dating-wise - nothing. Talked to some guys on OKC but haven't really gotten anywhere, not even to the point of exchanging phone numbers. Another Christmas on our own I guess, can#t afford to fly overseas to be with family (although my parents might come over, not decided yet). I'd love to find someone with kids, to have a bigger family - I grew up in a big family and it was wonderful (still is).

    That's all for now.
    Originally posted by Plush
    Online dating is hard but do not give up, there will be a good guy out there somewhere. I have had my own horror stories re dating sites but not every guy is the same.
    Debts 15981.64 total paid 2078
    Cashback Earnings YTD £167.28 Survey Earnings YTD £552.88
    • Plush
    • By Plush 11th Oct 17, 5:20 PM
    • 76 Posts
    • 185 Thanks
    Plush
    @Essex: you're so organised, so many good tips! When would I have time to do all that planning and lists?

    Also, re: school lunches. We live our home at 7:30am and we return at 6:45pm. DD does homework while I cook something quick, then bedtime, bath for DD and after that it's my time to relax a bit (normally read, or watch films on Netflix, or browse the Internet). I do prepare our bags for the morning but I don't have the energy to cook more to ensure DD has a nutritious lunch. I don't want her to have sandwiches and cold food everyday, or yesterday's leftovers (which cannot be heated at school); I think it's better if she gets a cooked meal at lunch. It's £2.20 per day.

    I do work from home 2 days now, but I use the lunch break to do laundry or go for a short run...

    Oh, and I waste food because I tend to buy too much! I think the meal planning should save some of that...
    • 117pauline
    • By 117pauline 11th Oct 17, 11:41 PM
    • 461 Posts
    • 5,636 Thanks
    117pauline
    On your two days working from home could you make a start on making an inventory of your fridge, freezer and cupboards? I imagine you won't spend so much time commuting.

    If you haven't menu planned for a while, start of small.
    For example, aim to use your fridge foods before they need binning. Then write a list of meals you can cook quickly and easily using as much stock from home as possible.

    I am a fan of batch cooking but again start small. Make a Bolognese sauce or stew enough for two days then freeze one. Not much difference in time preparing and clearing up for two portions and four.

    Next time you have another meal, do the same again. Gradually you will start to have a bank of home prepared frozen meals.

    Consult with your little one about meals to add to your meal plan so they feel involved.

    Don't try to reinvent the wheel. Most people have just a few meals they rotate. I have a list of meals we enjoy and just choose from that. Every two or three weeks, I experiment with a new dish. Some make the master list!

    EH has made some great suggestions but they might feel a bit out of reach to begin with.

    Also I often prepare a whole load of onions, mushrooms etc so I can use them later in the week. I put them in the fridge or freezer, depending on the menu plan.

    Not long till the weekend now, take care
    Pauline
    Don't get it perfect - Get it going
    Better Than Before
    • Tea&Kittens
    • By Tea&Kittens 12th Oct 17, 2:05 PM
    • 168 Posts
    • 635 Thanks
    Tea&Kittens
    OK - step-by-step for saving money on groceries.
    1) Grab as many receipts from shopping as you can find - and analyse them to work out what are your "expensive" items as a starting point. That's as good a place as any to look at making savings to start with.
    2) Put a mark against everything you bought a brand label for - and then look to "drop a level" on them next time you shop. NEVER flag this up to other members of the household - just serve it as normal, no bells or whistles. Mostly likely it'll vanish with no comment.
    3) Choose a couple of regularly bought items to drop to "value" products on and see how they are each week. Some will be great, some will be OK, some will be so disgusting you'll laugh over that experiment for years to come.
    4) Go through your cupboards, fridge, freezer. Make 2 lists - the first is for anything you have that could probably do with being used as a priority - eggs nearing the end of their date, veg going a bit bendy, that sort of thing. The second list is for everything else - you can ignore basic condiments but anything that classifies as a "building block" to make a meal from.
    5) Taking list 1 - write a week's meal plan - remember to think about breakfasts (that might use those eggs) lunches (Cheese & coleslaw sarnie with the bendy veg?) and dinners. Your aim is to use EVERYTHING on list 1.
    6) Looking at the meal plan in conjuctions with both lists, work out what you need to buy to make those meals. You've got the eggs, but do you need a load for toast and lunchtime sandwiches? Cheese to go with the coleslaw? You get the idea. ONLY the stuff you're short of goes on the list at this point though.
    7) use your receipts, and list 1 to note any routine purchases like milk, fruit etc that are needed, and add those to the shopping list. Factor in everything you need for the week - so you won't be tempted to go back again. (An exception to this might be milk, which is heavy, but I have a plan for dealing with this...)
    8) Go shopping, and purchase ONLY the items on that list.
    9) Take it all home and eat for a week knowing that you have all you need, and that nothing will be wasted.
    Originally posted by EssexHebridean
    Stealing this step by step thing ... getting there a bit at a time!

    Plush, I know what you mean about the dinners. When Kitty was smaller she had the hot meals in the winter, but took in packed lunches in warmer weather.
    Since I've been on here, I've started making a big batch of something at a weekend, when there's a bit more time, then I know I've got at least one dinner sorted for a busy day during the week. Would that kind of thing be helpful to you?
    October: NSDs 6 / 17 NSDs in a row: 1 / 5
    I started my debtfree journey on 07 September 2017: Total: £20,521 £19847
    Barclaycard: £14659 £14435 Oct 2017 HSBC Credit Card : £3112 £3012 Oct 2017
    Overdraft: 350 £0 Oct2017 MBNA : 2400
    A journey of a thousand miles starts with a single step. I'm on my way!
    • Plush
    • By Plush 12th Oct 17, 8:42 PM
    • 76 Posts
    • 185 Thanks
    Plush
    The meal planning and batch cooking are indeed great ideas. I've never really batch cooked so that's another thing to explore, I need to think about foods that can be frozen. I tend to cook very simple, quick things that don't take a lot of time but you can't exactly freeze (e.g. steamed veggies with fish, spaghetti carbonara, stir fry, some noodle dishes, warm salads, and so on).
    • Scott_Weiland
    • By Scott_Weiland 13th Oct 17, 8:42 AM
    • 659 Posts
    • 1,629 Thanks
    Scott_Weiland
    Another member of the "£150 a month for food, cleaning & basic toiletries club" here - we buy very little supermarket meat preferring to shop from farmers markets or direct from the supplier, but a LOT of seasonal fruit & veg from the cheap shops! Love the "super 6" and "Pick of the Week" type offers and frequently build my meal plan around whatever is the cheapest on the veg front.

    Almost the only branded stuff we now buy routinely is Fairy (only on offer but by FAR the best in our water) WU liquid, Nescafe coffee (the ordinary stuff, not the gold stuff) as MrEH pulls faces if I give him anything else, and washing powder or liquid as I love the smell of Bold or Surf and never find the own brand stuff as nice. If we were skint that last would go in favour of a discount brand though. Oh Branston beans through choice - but again, on offer only. On other things I'm happy to buy branded if it hits my target for price, but if it doesn't then own brand it will be.

    Plush - less alcohol might explain your weight loss all told if you've been out less than usual - there's a surprising amount of calories in that stuff!

    Oh - and stick that card in the back of a drawer and leave it there - go on, I dare you to get to the end of the week, to start with, without touching it. ()And then I'll dare you to go to the end of the month!)
    Originally posted by EssexHebridean

    Re Coffee i would do the same non brand coffee is vile. I find home bargains and b and m are canny for prices re coffee. My local poundland had loads of that Nescafe Azerra americano in last time i was in for 2quid. Poundland but its 2 quid hmmmmmmmm
    Debts 15981.64 total paid 2078
    Cashback Earnings YTD £167.28 Survey Earnings YTD £552.88
    • Plush
    • By Plush 13th Oct 17, 3:52 PM
    • 76 Posts
    • 185 Thanks
    Plush
    @Scott: coffee is my only addiction so I won't go down brands too much, I have to enjoy my coffee otherwise I'd get depressed! I used to drink Illy and all kinds of more expensive brands, but I've now switched to Lavazza and I buy packs of 2x 250g for less than £6.

    On a different note, I got a free trial YNAB subscription for 2 months and I managed to import transactions from the Spending Tracker app and so I'm planning on using YNAB for budgeting. Hope by Christmas to be able to have a good picture of my spending and to be able to create a realistic budget. I can decide later on if I want to continue using YNAB but for 2 months I'm all set.
    • happymo
    • By happymo 13th Oct 17, 9:57 PM
    • 7 Posts
    • 18 Thanks
    happymo
    I do batch cooking and freeze extra but you are right that the kind of quick food you are cooking doesn't freeze. Now winter is on its way I am cooking food like shepherds pie, stretching it by adding frozen mixed veges. I make a very large one and freeze plenty. As you are out all day a slow cooker would be a good idea. If making a casserole I would chop up the veges the night before, or buy prepared packs if reduced, stick in slow cooker with chicken or cheap cut of beef and let it cook all day. Only needs a jacket potato when you get in from work. Again you can cook a big batch and freeze.
    • Scott_Weiland
    • By Scott_Weiland 13th Oct 17, 11:48 PM
    • 659 Posts
    • 1,629 Thanks
    Scott_Weiland
    @Scott: coffee is my only addiction so I won't go down brands too much, I have to enjoy my coffee otherwise I'd get depressed! I used to drink Illy and all kinds of more expensive brands, but I've now switched to Lavazza and I buy packs of 2x 250g for less than £6.

    On a different note, I got a free trial YNAB subscription for 2 months and I managed to import transactions from the Spending Tracker app and so I'm planning on using YNAB for budgeting. Hope by Christmas to be able to have a good picture of my spending and to be able to create a realistic budget. I can decide later on if I want to continue using YNAB but for 2 months I'm all set.
    Originally posted by Plush
    Me too i do not do coffee which is cheap, it would be like drinking lambrini over a nice bottle of wine coffee lovers can tell the difference. Have a look at b and m and home bargains they do good deals on coffee.
    Debts 15981.64 total paid 2078
    Cashback Earnings YTD £167.28 Survey Earnings YTD £552.88
    • Plush
    • By Plush 14th Oct 17, 9:04 AM
    • 76 Posts
    • 185 Thanks
    Plush
    @happymo: very funny coincidence - my family who are visiting have just brought us a slow cooker (they are into fancy kitchenware, their kitchen is amazing)

    @scott: I've decided to avoid food shops for a while. Any shops really. Whenever I go out shopping for food I end up buying all kinds of extras. So I buy food online, then only go to buy stuff that I need (milk, bread, whatever I have on a list) without having a look around. In and out in 2 mins. This saves me from buying gourmet overpriced stuff - I once bought a small piece of cheese for £9.

    I'm my worst enemy.
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