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  • FIRST POST
    • Rock_007
    • By Rock_007 17th Sep 17, 8:40 PM
    • 56Posts
    • 14Thanks
    Rock_007
    Plaster(near window) came off while scrapping the paint
    • #1
    • 17th Sep 17, 8:40 PM
    Plaster(near window) came off while scrapping the paint 17th Sep 17 at 8:40 PM
    During scrapping the paint of the wall, some plaster came off near the windows can see clear wire net so i think in the past there was attempted to repair this plaster.
    Can some one please recommend any specific plaster or Mortar Mix that i should use to repair this portion of Plaster and if any special tools are needed to do it( as the portion of the wall is up side down)
    Any comment highly appreciated.

    [IMG][/IMG]

    [IMG][/IMG]
    Last edited by Rock_007; 18-09-2017 at 1:07 PM.
Page 1
    • flashg67
    • By flashg67 17th Sep 17, 8:54 PM
    • 2,294 Posts
    • 1,504 Thanks
    flashg67
    • #2
    • 17th Sep 17, 8:54 PM
    • #2
    • 17th Sep 17, 8:54 PM
    You can buy ' one coat plaster' but will need to do in stages - max on the one I used was 15mm or so for each layer, plus it's harder to get a smooth finish that doesn't need sanding. The 'normal' way would be a coat of bonding plaster, followed by a thin layer of skim, but usually only available in big bags
    A normal plasterer's float should do the job tool-wise
    • Rock_007
    • By Rock_007 17th Sep 17, 9:32 PM
    • 56 Posts
    • 14 Thanks
    Rock_007
    • #3
    • 17th Sep 17, 9:32 PM
    • #3
    • 17th Sep 17, 9:32 PM
    You can buy ' one coat plaster' but will need to do in stages - max on the one I used was 15mm or so for each layer, plus it's harder to get a smooth finish that doesn't need sanding. The 'normal' way would be a coat of bonding plaster, followed by a thin layer of skim, but usually only available in big bags
    A normal plasterer's float should do the job tool-wise
    Originally posted by flashg67
    Thanks, but do you think bonding plaster will hold itself as the surface is upside down?

    Also i am not very familiar with the plaster, what i got form the above post is that i will need two types of plater 1) one coat plaster 2) bonding plaster if i am not wrong.
    Last edited by Rock_007; 17-09-2017 at 10:18 PM.
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 18th Sep 17, 12:26 AM
    • 1,394 Posts
    • 1,997 Thanks
    FreeBear
    • #4
    • 18th Sep 17, 12:26 AM
    • #4
    • 18th Sep 17, 12:26 AM
    Thanks, but do you think bonding plaster will hold itself as the surface is upside down?

    Also i am not very familiar with the plaster, what i got form the above post is that i will need two types of plater 1) one coat plaster 2) bonding plaster if i am not wrong.
    Originally posted by Rock_007
    Bonding plaster will stick to the overhead bit - Just don't apply it too thick or too wet & sloppy. I'd also hack out that last bit that has cracked and apply a PVA/water mix first (it will help adhere to the cement underneath).

    Buying 25Kg bags of bonding & finishing plaster is going to be very wasteful for such a small job. The stuff doesn't keep, so you'd end up having to dispose of most of it. If you know someone in the building trade, they might be able to get you a part bag of each (5Kg would probably be more than enough).

    As for plasters, there is a whole long list. Some below -

    Bonding plaster (used as a base coat up to 11mm thick)
    Finishing plaster (the final skim coat, usually around 3mm thick)
    Magnetic plaster - You won't want this. An expensive substitute for a magnetic board.
    One coat plaster - Often sold to the DIYer and can be a pig to work with.
    Self leveling plaster - As above, and debatable as to whether it does "self level".

    Lime plasters - Unless you are working on a period property, you don't want to know
    Venetian plaster & tadelakt - Lime based, labour intensive, and very expensive (but worth it in the right setting).
    Last edited by FreeBear; 18-09-2017 at 12:29 AM.
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    • Rock_007
    • By Rock_007 18th Sep 17, 12:22 PM
    • 56 Posts
    • 14 Thanks
    Rock_007
    • #5
    • 18th Sep 17, 12:22 PM
    • #5
    • 18th Sep 17, 12:22 PM
    Bonding plaster will stick to the overhead bit - Just don't apply it too thick or too wet & sloppy. I'd also hack out that last bit that has cracked and apply a PVA/water mix first (it will help adhere to the cement underneath).

    Buying 25Kg bags of bonding & finishing plaster is going to be very wasteful for such a small job. The stuff doesn't keep, so you'd end up having to dispose of most of it. If you know someone in the building trade, they might be able to get you a part bag of each (5Kg would probably be more than enough).

    As for plasters, there is a whole long list. Some below -

    Bonding plaster (used as a base coat up to 11mm thick)
    Finishing plaster (the final skim coat, usually around 3mm thick)
    Magnetic plaster - You won't want this. An expensive substitute for a magnetic board.
    One coat plaster - Often sold to the DIYer and can be a pig to work with.
    Self leveling plaster - As above, and debatable as to whether it does "self level".

    Lime plasters - Unless you are working on a period property, you don't want to know
    Venetian plaster & tadelakt - Lime based, labour intensive, and very expensive (but worth it in the right setting).
    Originally posted by FreeBear
    Thanks for your advise,
    The depth i need to cover is more than 11mm i think, so may need to do couple of times and is it okay to give couple of hours to let it settle down before applying another layer of 11mm bounding plaster.
    Also for PVA i have read somewhere the ratio between PVA/water should be 3:1 if that is correct?

    i have found one at B&Q should this be alright to use it for my purpose ( i will buy 25Kg as there are other couple of similar patches in the house that needs to be done)
    1) (THISTLE BONDING COAT UNDERCOAT PLASTER 25KG)
    2) CEMENTONE PVA5L
    • anto164
    • By anto164 18th Sep 17, 2:30 PM
    • 135 Posts
    • 63 Thanks
    anto164
    • #6
    • 18th Sep 17, 2:30 PM
    • #6
    • 18th Sep 17, 2:30 PM
    if in doubt, just get a plasterer in, shouldn't be expensive. Plastering is an art, and if done badly can look terrible.
    • Rock_007
    • By Rock_007 18th Sep 17, 3:00 PM
    • 56 Posts
    • 14 Thanks
    Rock_007
    • #7
    • 18th Sep 17, 3:00 PM
    • #7
    • 18th Sep 17, 3:00 PM
    if in doubt, just get a plasterer in, shouldn't be expensive. Plastering is an art, and if done badly can look terrible.
    Originally posted by anto164
    I would but they are fully booked for months and i am looking to move house within a month.
    • bris
    • By bris 18th Sep 17, 5:09 PM
    • 7,094 Posts
    • 6,110 Thanks
    bris
    • #8
    • 18th Sep 17, 5:09 PM
    • #8
    • 18th Sep 17, 5:09 PM
    I use this stuff from Screwfix http://www.screwfix.com/p/no-nonsense-ready-mixed-plaster-white-10kg/23226


    Cant rate it highly enough. It needs to be layered on over a few days, but when built up its easy to sand to a smooth finish for an invisible repair.


    Just don't be tempted to make the layers to thick.
    • minibbb
    • By minibbb 18th Sep 17, 5:10 PM
    • 316 Posts
    • 76 Thanks
    minibbb
    • #9
    • 18th Sep 17, 5:10 PM
    • #9
    • 18th Sep 17, 5:10 PM
    Look at toupret interior filler (the powdered one) specs state is has no max depth.

    I used it for a similar depth hole around a socket and it was perfect. I would fill yours in three sessions. It sands v easily and I achieved a perfect finish- you would never know it had been repaired now.
    • Rock_007
    • By Rock_007 11th Oct 17, 8:41 PM
    • 56 Posts
    • 14 Thanks
    Rock_007
    i opted for re plastering all the rooms....

    My plaster put the pva and then put the coating of plaster but just a day after he replastered the walls i can see some sort of cracks in it . is any one has any idea what are these cracks and if we can do something about it ....
    Any comments really appreciated



    • TheCyclingProgrammer
    • By TheCyclingProgrammer 11th Oct 17, 8:52 PM
    • 2,904 Posts
    • 1,658 Thanks
    TheCyclingProgrammer
    You need to get the plasterer back.

    A few hairline cracks in new plaster is normal. What you’ve got there looks to me like the plaster has dried out far too quickly, possibly due to poor preparation. What was under the skim before in that spot?

    I think it might have to be reskimmed.
    • Rock_007
    • By Rock_007 11th Oct 17, 9:12 PM
    • 56 Posts
    • 14 Thanks
    Rock_007
    Before plastering we removed the paper wall (very old paper) and then were left with very dry paint older then the paper wall that wouldn't come off so the guy put the pva and new plaster top of it.

    I showed him what happened to the plaster and he said that most probably the wall was really dry under and sucked all the water or something like that, he suggested that after applying the first coat of paint (new plaster paint) it will help by moisturising the cracks and it will get fixed..... but i am not sure how true it is.
    • TheCyclingProgrammer
    • By TheCyclingProgrammer 11th Oct 17, 10:33 PM
    • 2,904 Posts
    • 1,658 Thanks
    TheCyclingProgrammer
    “Moisturising the cracks”.

    He’s fobbing you off. He needs to fix it.
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