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    • Eliza
    • By Eliza 16th Sep 17, 6:55 PM
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    Eliza
    Remarking GCSEs
    • #1
    • 16th Sep 17, 6:55 PM
    Remarking GCSEs 16th Sep 17 at 6:55 PM
    Sorry, not sure where to ask this but has anyone been contacted by school about remarking their child's GCSEs? It seems a bit late now but they've asked for the child to go in and sign that he agrees to one subject being remarked as school seems to think there's an 'anomaly' with it. Does he have to do this? He's no longer at school of course and happily settled into college. He's concerned that he could be marked down which would mess up his current course.

    Thanks.
Page 1
    • Primrose
    • By Primrose 16th Sep 17, 7:09 PM
    • 7,785 Posts
    • 26,107 Thanks
    Primrose
    • #2
    • 16th Sep 17, 7:09 PM
    • #2
    • 16th Sep 17, 7:09 PM
    Can he sign to the effect that he's only prepared to be re-marked up, but not down? !
    • AElene
    • By AElene 16th Sep 17, 7:14 PM
    • 69 Posts
    • 355 Thanks
    AElene
    • #3
    • 16th Sep 17, 7:14 PM
    • #3
    • 16th Sep 17, 7:14 PM
    If he's left school now, I don't think they can make him sign or have his papers re-marked. I think I'd be tempted to just ignore it.
    • wishicouldmakeitbetter
    • By wishicouldmakeitbetter 16th Sep 17, 7:20 PM
    • 86 Posts
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    wishicouldmakeitbetter
    • #4
    • 16th Sep 17, 7:20 PM
    • #4
    • 16th Sep 17, 7:20 PM
    If it's a remark it's probably borderline to the next grade up. It could be marked down but unlikely to make a difference to the grade. On the other hand it could mean that he goes up a grade!
    • Eliza
    • By Eliza 16th Sep 17, 7:45 PM
    • 1,280 Posts
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    Eliza
    • #5
    • 16th Sep 17, 7:45 PM
    • #5
    • 16th Sep 17, 7:45 PM
    Will probably just ignore in that case and hope they can't insist. If the grade goes down he will have to come off his course, or resit. If it goes up it won't make a lot of difference to that though it could long term I suppose. Just wondered if anyone else had encountered this situation.

    Thanks
    • sammyjammy
    • By sammyjammy 16th Sep 17, 7:46 PM
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    sammyjammy
    • #6
    • 16th Sep 17, 7:46 PM
    • #6
    • 16th Sep 17, 7:46 PM
    My GCSE English Language was remarked, as was 70% of my year group as we had been given Ds, they were remarked to a C. I wasn't asked to sign anything, in fact I knew nothing about it until after the event.
    "You've been reading SOS when it's just your clock reading 5:05 "
    • elsien
    • By elsien 16th Sep 17, 7:51 PM
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    elsien
    • #7
    • 16th Sep 17, 7:51 PM
    • #7
    • 16th Sep 17, 7:51 PM
    Ask the school what they think the anomaly is? I think it's very unlikely they'd ask for a remark if they thought it'd go down a grade.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • clairec79
    • By clairec79 16th Sep 17, 8:02 PM
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    clairec79
    • #8
    • 16th Sep 17, 8:02 PM
    • #8
    • 16th Sep 17, 8:02 PM
    They have done this with my daughter - basically 4/5ths of the year did badly in one particular subject - so the school have paid for one at each grade to be remarked to see if the school was teaching it wrongly or if there was an issue with the marking.

    My daughter's was one of the ones selected (I know she was 2 marks off the cut off) - she was asked to sign to agree to it being remarked earlier this week
    • sulphate
    • By sulphate 16th Sep 17, 8:02 PM
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    sulphate
    • #9
    • 16th Sep 17, 8:02 PM
    • #9
    • 16th Sep 17, 8:02 PM
    Find out the grade boundaries and how his mark sat between the two grades, before you agree to it.

    For example, say he got a B, his mark was 79% and you need 70% for a B and 80% for an A, then it might be worth remarking if the school think it's a good idea, because his grade is more likely to go up rather than down.
    • pinkshoes
    • By pinkshoes 16th Sep 17, 8:57 PM
    • 15,321 Posts
    • 20,871 Thanks
    pinkshoes
    As a teacher, we only bother paying for a remark of a paper where a child should have done better, and their grade was very close to the boundary.

    If the school are requesting this, then they clearly feel your son stands a good chance of going up a grade.

    It is highly unlikely that they would mark him down a grade, as this would mean a ridiculous amount of marks deducted.

    Personally I would get him to sign and go for it.
    Should've = Should HAVE (not 'of')
    Would've = Would HAVE (not 'of')

    No, I am not perfect, but yes I do judge people on their use of basic English language. If you didn't know the above, then learn it! (If English is your second language, then you are forgiven!)
    • Madmel
    • By Madmel 16th Sep 17, 9:06 PM
    • 624 Posts
    • 1,209 Thanks
    Madmel
    I work at DDs' school. Head of English asked if DD1 could contact her about her A level grade. She wanted DD's permission to get a remark in one paper as she felt DD and the rest of the cohort had been unfairly treated. We talked it over at home. Luckily DD did not need this result for her university place, so she decided that a remark would not affect her detrimentally and might help someone else, so agreed to it.

    Mark's came back this week. The paper in question has been remarked and DD has now gained an extra 13 marks. It has not affected her overall grade as she had done amazingly well in the other 2 papers, but I have no doubt that if others in the group have been similarly affected, grades could go up. I will ask the teacher when I see her next week. The reason given for the increase in the mark was "an unreasonable exercise of academic judgement". Make of this what you will!

    If it may help someone, especially as English was one of the new exams this year for both GCSE and A level, it may be worthwhile. I know that marking has been inconsistent across the boards.
    • cjdavies
    • By cjdavies 16th Sep 17, 9:15 PM
    • 2,785 Posts
    • 2,790 Thanks
    cjdavies
    Depends on your risk level of 50/50 going each way.
    • sn1987a
    • By sn1987a 17th Sep 17, 12:19 AM
    • 378 Posts
    • 418 Thanks
    sn1987a
    The school cannot force anyone to sign a paper for remarking. Ask the school how many marks he was away from the next grade and how many marks away from the lower grade. If you are confident with the system, just ask the raw marks and look it up online by yourself by finding the boundaries of the paper. You may have already the individual marks from the gcse certificate. I doubt the school would want a remark if they think that the grade could go down.

    If you have the individual marks and the exam board, I can help you find the boundaries to see how far away he was from the next grade.
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 17th Sep 17, 6:46 AM
    • 16,053 Posts
    • 39,912 Thanks
    FBaby
    They are clearly prepared to pay for it, so they must feel quite confident that they have a good chance to go up and next to none going down.

    It all depends on how they feel and whether going up a mark would make a difference. If it's a case of going from a B to an A and they are happy with their course, and they don't intend on studying Medicine, then I would leave it behind.

    If it's a case of trying to go from a D to a C in Maths, even if on the course, I would think it is worth doing if they are only a couple of points from the C grade.
    • suejb2
    • By suejb2 17th Sep 17, 11:49 AM
    • 1,276 Posts
    • 1,936 Thanks
    suejb2
    School
    In my opinion, and it's what you asked for, you have nothing to lose.

    The school are doing it for their benefit as well as your sons, it will probably improve their overall ranking in the school league tables. Doubt they will do it if there was a chance of it lowering .

    They are paying for it.
    Life is like a bath, the longer you are in it the more wrinkly you become.
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 17th Sep 17, 6:00 PM
    • 37,823 Posts
    • 34,215 Thanks
    Savvy_Sue
    Surely if they want him to sign this piece of paper that badly, they'll be willing to post it to him and let him send it back again?
    Still knitting!
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    • maman
    • By maman 17th Sep 17, 11:09 PM
    • 16,969 Posts
    • 101,500 Thanks
    maman
    Will probably just ignore in that case and hope they can't insist. If the grade goes down he will have to come off his course, or resit. If it goes up it won't make a lot of difference to that though it could long term I suppose. Just wondered if anyone else had encountered this situation.

    Thanks
    Originally posted by Eliza
    It happens quite a lot. Most parents would want to support the school and make sure their child had the best possible mark. Some parents request and pay for a remark themselves.

    I can't believe any school would consider an expensive remark unless they thought the pupils would do better after.

    I'd ask the school the questions.
    • dekaspace
    • By dekaspace 18th Sep 17, 12:28 AM
    • 3,576 Posts
    • 2,907 Thanks
    dekaspace
    Apologies for butting in but thinking back to 19 years ago when I left school I was expected to get a high 2 or low 1 grade in Computer Studies, what had happened was we had 1 day of teaching robotics in 2 years and teacher said it has never came up in the history of exams so not to worry, when the exam came in it was pretty much 90% robotics so I only got a grade 3, a few weeks later I got a new certificate with a grade 1 which was my prelim result.

    Never understood why I got it without requesting though.
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 18th Sep 17, 8:17 AM
    • 36,042 Posts
    • 152,232 Thanks
    silvercar
    Schools rarely offer to pay. They must have a very strong feeling that the mark will go up.
    • clairec79
    • By clairec79 18th Sep 17, 8:26 AM
    • 2,272 Posts
    • 6,153 Thanks
    clairec79
    Apologies for butting in but thinking back to 19 years ago when I left school I was expected to get a high 2 or low 1 grade in Computer Studies, what had happened was we had 1 day of teaching robotics in 2 years and teacher said it has never came up in the history of exams so not to worry, when the exam came in it was pretty much 90% robotics so I only got a grade 3, a few weeks later I got a new certificate with a grade 1 which was my prelim result.

    Never understood why I got it without requesting though.
    Originally posted by dekaspace
    I know my daughters school (see above) have said if all the ones they have selected for remark go up significantly they will pay for the entire year to be remarked - I'm guessing if it's a year wide thing they don't ask individual permission
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