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    • chesky
    • By chesky 16th Sep 17, 1:48 PM
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    chesky
    Home visit from school
    • #1
    • 16th Sep 17, 1:48 PM
    Home visit from school 16th Sep 17 at 1:48 PM
    My great grandson is - to my granddaughter's joy - starting next week at her local state nursery school which is attached to her nearest primary school.

    I was surprised to hear that, before his first day (Thursday), someone from the school will be visiting her at home. I mentioned it to a friend and she said it was quite the norm but didn't know the reason for these visits.

    Is it just in our part of London that this happens and what's the reason for it?
Page 1
    • LilElvis
    • By LilElvis 16th Sep 17, 2:03 PM
    • 3,174 Posts
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    LilElvis
    • #2
    • 16th Sep 17, 2:03 PM
    • #2
    • 16th Sep 17, 2:03 PM
    My great grandson is - to my granddaughter's joy - starting next week at her local state nursery school which is attached to her nearest primary school.

    I was surprised to hear that, before his first day (Thursday), someone from the school will be visiting her at home. I mentioned it to a friend and she said it was quite the norm but didn't know the reason for these visits.

    Is it just in our part of London that this happens and what's the reason for it?
    Originally posted by chesky
    My daughter is 7 and we had a home visit before she started Foundation with both her class teacher and teaching assistant visiting together. She also had 3 sessions in the July where the children went into the classroom in groups for an hour or two to help them to acclimatise. The teaching staff therefore had had an opportunity to observe the children prior to them starting school full-time, but the home visit allows them to see the child in an environment in which they are comfortable and are more likely to see their natural behaviour and disposition. They chatted with my daughter about what she liked to do at nursery and I was able to ask them any questions I had and to give them any information which I considered relevant. They also borrowed her work and observation folder from nursery so they could read more about her attitude/behaviour/abilities. I found it a very pro active and positive experience and meant that they had some understanding of the children when they went into school for their first official day and, conversely, the children weren't as nervous as they weren't being left with strangers.
    • k3lvc
    • By k3lvc 16th Sep 17, 2:19 PM
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    k3lvc
    • #3
    • 16th Sep 17, 2:19 PM
    • #3
    • 16th Sep 17, 2:19 PM
    Happened for both ours in North and in London. Nice way to introduce teachers to family and vice versa in the home environment but suspect there's also an 'address checking' element for those who claim to live in places they don't for catchment purposes (not seen evidence of this in the North but certainly did in London
    • skattykatty
    • By skattykatty 16th Sep 17, 2:53 PM
    • 385 Posts
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    skattykatty
    • #4
    • 16th Sep 17, 2:53 PM
    • #4
    • 16th Sep 17, 2:53 PM
    Quite normal. I work in schools and Reception class teachers make home visits at the start of the year.
    • alwaysskint96
    • By alwaysskint96 16th Sep 17, 3:36 PM
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    alwaysskint96
    • #5
    • 16th Sep 17, 3:36 PM
    • #5
    • 16th Sep 17, 3:36 PM
    this happened for my eldest 2 in London- but not for my 3rd in Essex
    • AylesburyDuck
    • By AylesburyDuck 16th Sep 17, 4:17 PM
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    AylesburyDuck
    • #6
    • 16th Sep 17, 4:17 PM
    • #6
    • 16th Sep 17, 4:17 PM
    Didnt used to happen round here, my youngest is now 17 though. Glad it didnt either, i have an immense dislike of people coming in my home unless i know them extremely well, it's beyond dislike actually it really does cause me a lot of anxiety. Valid reasons for it though, which i shan't go into.
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    • kingfisherblue
    • By kingfisherblue 16th Sep 17, 4:44 PM
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    kingfisherblue
    • #7
    • 16th Sep 17, 4:44 PM
    • #7
    • 16th Sep 17, 4:44 PM
    I'm in Merseyside, and my oldest is 26. We didn't have a visit from her teacher.

    My middle child is 19 and disabled, and even though he attended the school nursery, we had a visit (different school to my daughter - she attended the village school but it closed down). My younger son attended the same school as his brother and I can't remember whether we had a visit or not - again, he had attended the school nursery from age three.
    • suejb2
    • By suejb2 16th Sep 17, 4:54 PM
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    suejb2
    • #8
    • 16th Sep 17, 4:54 PM
    Home
    • #8
    • 16th Sep 17, 4:54 PM
    We had home visits for our children prior to starting primary. It is to see how the child is in comfortable surroundings but also to check you live where you say you live and didn't put a false address in the catchment area rather than your home address out of the area!
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    • determined new ms
    • By determined new ms 16th Sep 17, 4:57 PM
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    determined new ms
    • #9
    • 16th Sep 17, 4:57 PM
    • #9
    • 16th Sep 17, 4:57 PM
    we live in Kent and for many schools around here it is normal. We didn't have it for the school we chose after all, as they don't do it. I was glad if I'm honest I find the thought a little intrusive - we're quite hermitish by nature!
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    • chesky
    • By chesky 16th Sep 17, 5:40 PM
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    chesky
    Quite normal. I work in schools and Reception class teachers make home visits at the start of the year.
    Originally posted by skattykatty
    Thanks everyone. How times do change, I think it would have been unheard of, even for my grandchildren.

    It must be so time consuming for the teachers - if you think there must be, what 20 or 25 - each one to travel to, then stay I suppose for an hour or so.

    I did also wonder about the address checking. I think we've had trouble with this locally, with people trying to get into schools here by renting somewhere for a short period of time.
    • Spendless
    • By Spendless 16th Sep 17, 5:42 PM
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    Spendless
    I've got 2 kids now aged 17 and 14, both attended the nursery attached to the school they went to. Home visits weren't done for the older one, but were for the younger. I didn't get one though, as unaware there'd been a policy change in the interim years, I'd booked us to go on holiday. I told them we couldn't do the home visit and that was fine by them.
    • Mrs Soup
    • By Mrs Soup 16th Sep 17, 7:48 PM
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    Mrs Soup
    My children are ten and 7 and this happened with both. The teacher and TA came round for about half an hour. TA played with child and teacher talked to me- gave me some bits of paper, we had a chance to tell them about childs foibles. They only went into the one room we sat them in- didn't have a cup of tea (they do several visits a day and would be awash with the stuff). Just a chance for child to be a bit more familiar with people when they start (lots of schools reception start later than other years) don't have to agree to them coming if you don't want to.
    • clairec79
    • By clairec79 16th Sep 17, 8:07 PM
    • 2,277 Posts
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    clairec79
    My kids are between 16 and 6 and we never had this at all, there was a session to go up for an hour or so with the parents so they could meet the staff and see the environment - no home visits
    • Amara
    • By Amara 16th Sep 17, 8:44 PM
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    Amara
    I live near York, my son is Year 1. We had home vist too, when he started Reception.
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    • Kynthia
    • By Kynthia 17th Sep 17, 12:37 AM
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    Kynthia
    I haven't heard of it happening in my area but have heard of it elsewhere. Someone told me that the nursery class starts a week later to allow the teacher to spend the first week of term making these visits.
    Don't listen to me, I'm no expert!
    • Wannabedebtfree01
    • By Wannabedebtfree01 17th Sep 17, 1:06 AM
    • 5 Posts
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    Wannabedebtfree01
    I thought it was odd when my daughter's teacher wanted to do a home visit , until I'd been told for two weeks in a row she'd had to do PE in her pants for not having her PE kit. Apparently she'd been bullied into giving someone else her PE kit. So don't be too suspicious of these visits!
    • Threebabes
    • By Threebabes 17th Sep 17, 11:18 AM
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    Threebabes
    Ive got 3, 21, 17 and 13.

    We got a visit before youngest started nursery, we live in the north east.
    • frugalmacdugal
    • By frugalmacdugal 17th Sep 17, 11:30 AM
    • 6,162 Posts
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    frugalmacdugal
    Hi,

    I think it's to see what kinda environment the child lives in, is the house clean and tidy?

    Might ask to use the toilet, then have a wee snoop around when upstairs to check bedrooms.
    Y'all take care now.
    • loulou41
    • By loulou41 17th Sep 17, 11:34 AM
    • 2,628 Posts
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    loulou41
    It's routine for some school sometimes they visit the child at preschool.
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 17th Sep 17, 12:46 PM
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    Jojo the Tightfisted
    Happened 20 years ago for DD1 and 13 for DD2. The explanation is that it's easier for children if they know the teacher/TA.

    No checking up involved, they got a reading book, various paperwork was handed over, arrangements for the start of term were discussed, everybody was happy.

    Obviously, if the place is littered with vodka bottles or drugs paraphernalia, something would be said once back at school, but those parents won't be likely to agree to the visit in the first place.



    The ex went absolutely ballistic about the idea, yelled, shouted and stamped his foot that 'no busybodies were going to check up on us as though we were common chav scum' - so I made the appointment for whilst he was at work - had he turned up without warning, he'd have created an issue when there was none. And yes, I did find it ironic that, for all his conviction that he was better than people on benefits due to his parents' income and lifestyle, he was behaving like that about it. His departure for younger arms later on that year was of little consequence to me.
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