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  • FIRST POST
    • maccajock
    • By maccajock 16th Sep 17, 8:37 AM
    • 3Posts
    • 0Thanks
    maccajock
    Homebuyers report cat 3 issues
    • #1
    • 16th Sep 17, 8:37 AM
    Homebuyers report cat 3 issues 16th Sep 17 at 8:37 AM
    Hi,
    New to the forum and also a 1st time buyer with a couple of questions.

    Homebuyers report has shown 4 cat 3 issues.


    House is 21 years old and borders council owned land.
    1. Blown seals in 5 of the six windows along with handles, hinges etc all at end of life
    2 Blown seal in 1 of the conservatory windows
    3. Boiler is original, still supply parts at the mo via British gas but could become obsolete.
    4 Side/rear garden wall is not plumb on the side and has large cracks on the rear section, the side section borders council land and the report states that cause is likely a tree growing nearby on the council land..

    We are really keen on the house after 6 months of looking and TBH points 1,2 & 3 to me are general wear and tear but also a bit of a lack of care from the current owners.

    However point 4 is ringing alarm bells the garden wall is roughly 2.2 mtrs high with a total length of 10 mtrs along the side and another 4 mtrs across the rear, do I get a detailed survey done for wall and the potential cause, who pays for this and any remedial works or would I be looking at reducing my offer.
    I read online its about £1k a metre for take down and rebuild

    I have my mortgage offer signed and ready to be returned to the lender....any advice greatly appreciated

    Many thanks
Page 1
    • Tom99
    • By Tom99 16th Sep 17, 9:04 AM
    • 581 Posts
    • 338 Thanks
    Tom99
    • #2
    • 16th Sep 17, 9:04 AM
    • #2
    • 16th Sep 17, 9:04 AM
    Is the wall yours?
    How close is the tree?
    Is the wall leaning over if so how much?
    • maccajock
    • By maccajock 16th Sep 17, 9:28 AM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    maccajock
    • #3
    • 16th Sep 17, 9:28 AM
    • #3
    • 16th Sep 17, 9:28 AM
    Yes its the garden wall.

    Tree about 10 feet away and the report just says it could be the potential cause but will need specialist investigation
    • societys child
    • By societys child 16th Sep 17, 10:20 AM
    • 4,828 Posts
    • 5,267 Thanks
    societys child
    • #4
    • 16th Sep 17, 10:20 AM
    • #4
    • 16th Sep 17, 10:20 AM
    1. Blown seals in 5 of the six windows along with handles, hinges etc all at end of life
    There are "window doctors" can re-seal the units, if you don't want to replace the whole window. Sounds like handles and hinges need a drop of oil/ wd40 on the moving parts.

    All boilers will become obsolete - eventually.

    Can't see the wall . . . is it leaning dangerously?
    I once bought a house with a 2m high wall which was leaning in, I reduced the height to stabilise it and suddenly it didn't look nearly as bad. (It was pointless anyway, when there were two driveway entrances which anyone could simply walk through) I've moved since, but the wall is still there and hasn't moved, almost 20 years later.

    • ashe
    • By ashe 16th Sep 17, 11:00 AM
    • 199 Posts
    • 150 Thanks
    ashe
    • #5
    • 16th Sep 17, 11:00 AM
    • #5
    • 16th Sep 17, 11:00 AM
    we recently had a front window replaced and it was £120, apparently for multiple it works out cheaper but for a single one works out more expensive, so that shouldn't be a huge job.
    • G_M
    • By G_M 16th Sep 17, 12:09 PM
    • 41,985 Posts
    • 48,599 Thanks
    G_M
    • #6
    • 16th Sep 17, 12:09 PM
    • #6
    • 16th Sep 17, 12:09 PM
    Is the wall yours?
    Originally posted by Tom99
    Yes its the garden wall.
    The explanation negates the answer. It may be 'the garde wall' but may not belong to the property.

    A garden wall (assuming it is not the council's) is not a structural part of the property. You house is not going to fall down. Nor is a garden wall a legal requirement (subject to reading the title documents). So there is no real need either to keep or repair the wall. It's cosmetic in most cases. Reair it if it worries you.

    Speak to the council about the tree once you own - they may do something, they may not.

    Budget for either replacement windws some time in the future when finances allow, or for 're-sealing'.

    This is something you must (should) have seen when viewing, so your offer should have allowed for the state of the windows.

    Boiler might last for years. If/when it breaks down, repair it. If/when replacement parts are unobtainable, replace it (though a decent engineer can source re-claimed parts even after it becomes obsolete).

    Nothing here to cause you to withdraw, or to justify a price reduction.
    Last edited by G_M; 16-09-2017 at 12:48 PM.
    • martinthebandit
    • By martinthebandit 16th Sep 17, 12:15 PM
    • 3,302 Posts
    • 5,585 Thanks
    martinthebandit
    • #7
    • 16th Sep 17, 12:15 PM
    • #7
    • 16th Sep 17, 12:15 PM
    That does not answer the question.

    A garden wall (assuming it is not the council's) is not a structural part of the property. You house is not going to fall down. Nor is a garden wall a legal requirement (subject to reading the title documents). So there is no real need either to keep or repair the wall. It's cosmetic in most cases. Reair it if it worries you.

    Speak to the council about the tree once you own - they may do something, they may not.

    Budget for either replacement windws some time in the future when finances allow, or for 're-sealing'.

    This is something you must (should) have seen when viewing, so your offer should have allowed for the state of the windows.

    Boiler might last for years. If when it breaks down, repair it. If/when replacement parts are unobtainable, replace it (though a decent engineer can source re-claimed parts even after it becomes obsolete).

    Nothing here to cause you to withdraw, or to justify a price reduction.
    Originally posted by G_M
    This seems like the right answe to me.
    Politics -
    from the words Poli, meaning many
    and tics meaning blood sucking parasites


    (thanks to Kinky Friedman (or Larry Hardman) for the quote}
    • Tom99
    • By Tom99 17th Sep 17, 12:19 AM
    • 581 Posts
    • 338 Thanks
    Tom99
    • #8
    • 17th Sep 17, 12:19 AM
    • #8
    • 17th Sep 17, 12:19 AM
    Garden walls often crack and lean but it is when they lean dangerously you need to think of repair.

    What sort of specialist had you in mind to survey the wall?

    This site has a bit of information:-

    http://www.collier-stevens.co.uk/surveyors-blog/2011/when-garden-walls-go-bad/
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