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  • FIRST POST
    • Cardinal-Red
    • By Cardinal-Red 15th Sep 17, 2:02 PM
    • 643Posts
    • 144Thanks
    Cardinal-Red
    Putting french doors into garage - what to consider?
    • #1
    • 15th Sep 17, 2:02 PM
    Putting french doors into garage - what to consider? 15th Sep 17 at 2:02 PM
    We are buying a property that has a double detached garage. However for the first time that I can remember, the only access to the garage is through the 2 up and over doors at the front.

    I would like to build a side door to allow access to the garage. From the design, it looks most likely to go at the back of the garage, i.e. opposite wall to the up and overs.

    The garage is brick built and looks like a single layer all the way around.

    Am I missing anything in terms of the plan being just to knock some of the bricks out,and put in a new French door frame and doors.

    And any reason to shy away from the ones being sold used on Gumtree (obvious inspections aside)? Like this one for instance:

    https://www.gumtree.com/p/doors-windows/upvc-french-doors-excellent-condition-chrome-handles-ready-for-collection/1266153972

    Obviously I'd check with seller but I assume the sale of these would normally be the doors, and frames?

    The main purpose of this fix is to allow our little ones to get in and out of the shed to get their bikes etc so not looking for an amazing finish. And no change of use of the garage - just storage.

    Thanks!
    The above facts belong to everybody; the opinions belong to me; the distinction is yours to draw...
Page 1
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 15th Sep 17, 2:39 PM
    • 2,835 Posts
    • 5,074 Thanks
    EachPenny
    • #2
    • 15th Sep 17, 2:39 PM
    • #2
    • 15th Sep 17, 2:39 PM
    The main thing is to maintain support to whatever sits directly above where you intend to put the doors in. Whether wall or roof it will need support of some kind. And obviously a hole wide enough for a pair of French doors will need more supporting structure than a hole for a single door. If all you need is access for the kids, why do you need a double door?

    In terms of second-hand uPVC, one of the issues will be avoiding any distortion in the frame - either existing or created during installation. uPVC doors are very fussy when it comes to alignment - if they aren't properly aligned then it becomes near impossible to properly close and lock/unlock them.

    I would strongly suggest getting the advice of a qualified structural engineer before making holes in walls. Especially ones which are only a single brick thick as these are inherently less stable.
    "In the future, everyone will be rich for 15 minutes"
    • Cardinal-Red
    • By Cardinal-Red 15th Sep 17, 2:52 PM
    • 643 Posts
    • 144 Thanks
    Cardinal-Red
    • #3
    • 15th Sep 17, 2:52 PM
    • #3
    • 15th Sep 17, 2:52 PM
    Thank you!

    The main reason for going double was utility - if we're having a door there we may as well make use of it, so I wanted it to be wide enough that I could wheel my BBQ through etc. It's not essential at all.
    The above facts belong to everybody; the opinions belong to me; the distinction is yours to draw...
    • Waterlily24
    • By Waterlily24 15th Sep 17, 6:15 PM
    • 861 Posts
    • 454 Thanks
    Waterlily24
    • #4
    • 15th Sep 17, 6:15 PM
    • #4
    • 15th Sep 17, 6:15 PM
    Ignore me I got the wrong end of the stick lol
    Last edited by Waterlily24; 15-09-2017 at 6:18 PM.
    • Furts
    • By Furts 15th Sep 17, 6:23 PM
    • 3,554 Posts
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    Furts
    • #5
    • 15th Sep 17, 6:23 PM
    • #5
    • 15th Sep 17, 6:23 PM
    .

    I would strongly suggest getting the advice of a qualified structural engineer before making holes in walls. Especially ones which are only a single brick thick as these are inherently less stable.
    Originally posted by EachPenny

    I second this. Think carefully because a French doors frame will be a big hole in a single skin wall. It can be done but be careful of interfering with existing piers - there should be some to stiffen the wall. Then consider adding new tied in piers to stiffen up each side of the opening, but these need to come off the foundation. Then size up the lintel needed.
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 15th Sep 17, 8:10 PM
    • 2,835 Posts
    • 5,074 Thanks
    EachPenny
    • #6
    • 15th Sep 17, 8:10 PM
    • #6
    • 15th Sep 17, 8:10 PM
    The main reason for going double was utility - if we're having a door there we may as well make use of it, so I wanted it to be wide enough that I could wheel my BBQ through etc. It's not essential at all.
    Originally posted by Cardinal-Red
    But you have two big up-and-over doors to take the BBQ in and out through

    I can see your point, but as Furts has echoed, making big holes in brick walls involves a lot of work.

    If you are using the garage for storage rather than two cars then I would seriously consider altering one of the main doors to provide a personnel door. This could either be by replacing one of the existing up and over doors with a door of the same size containing a personnel door (you should be able to find some examples with an online search), or by getting a carpenter/builder to make up a framework to fit inside the garage door frame to house a smaller door (with the remaining area being covered with appropriate cladding). Either way it would be possible to reinstate use as a double garage if you or a future purchaser wanted to. Altering an existing door will be far far cheaper than the cost of making a new doorway.
    "In the future, everyone will be rich for 15 minutes"
    • Furts
    • By Furts 16th Sep 17, 6:47 AM
    • 3,554 Posts
    • 2,216 Thanks
    Furts
    • #7
    • 16th Sep 17, 6:47 AM
    • #7
    • 16th Sep 17, 6:47 AM
    Altering an existing door will be far far cheaper than the cost of making a new doorway.
    Originally posted by EachPenny
    True but aesthetics come into this. It is for OP to decide if this will look acceptable. Also bear in mind how building has evolved. Garages should have a personnel door as standard, if they are to be used as a garage. So fitting one where one is absent is a good idea, But a disability door ideally with a flush threshold type cill would mean less knocking around and less risks to the structure.
    • Cardinal-Red
    • By Cardinal-Red 18th Sep 17, 11:01 AM
    • 643 Posts
    • 144 Thanks
    Cardinal-Red
    • #8
    • 18th Sep 17, 11:01 AM
    • #8
    • 18th Sep 17, 11:01 AM
    Hi both,

    Yes we considered that option. But for 3 reasons decided against it:
    • Privacy - the front of the garage opens onto the driveway and so onto the street, and it just feels like inviting trouble to have a glass window there
    • Usefullness - the front of the garage sits level with the back of the house - and so siting the new door at the side or back (opening our directly to the garden) adds usefulness to the garage because we can access from the garden rgeb
    • Security - by not having to go to the front doors each time we can keep the gate to the back garden locked when in use

    I'll get a builder to come look and recommend a surveyor for it.

    Thank you all!
    The above facts belong to everybody; the opinions belong to me; the distinction is yours to draw...
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