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  • FIRST POST
    • VfM4meplse
    • By VfM4meplse 14th Sep 17, 6:26 PM
    • 23,948Posts
    • 50,269Thanks
    VfM4meplse
    Please let me hold your hand...roll on 2018!
    • #1
    • 14th Sep 17, 6:26 PM
    Please let me hold your hand...roll on 2018! 14th Sep 17 at 6:26 PM
    I've had a bit of (good) news today and am going to need some OS handholding for a few weeks. Quite a few weeks

    In fact I can feel the stress coursing through my body right now - so will go for a brisk walk and then fill in the blanks on this post. I need all the practical OS shortcuts I can get!


    Ok, so I'm exercised and showered and have had a chance to think...life's about to get crazy! I am pleased to say that after a long and picky search, it looks like I'm going to finally move back to the shires! (Well, Essex to be precise). If the sale goes through in 13 weeks as I hope that takes us to the the week before Christmas. With slippage, realistically it wil be in the New Year but there is a stack of stuff to do beforehand. Ironically, the only thing I feel I have a handle on is the finances and paperwork!

    The thought of having to pack up the house filled me with dread, there is just so much stuff, much of which I never use! But having thought about it, I know its possible but would appreciate some guidance. I knew I was going to have to economise for at least 12 of the weeks before 2018 but now I've got no choice. Where do I start?

    Food is probably the easiest: no buying it. 3 months to work my way through the freezer. Which is not so easy given that it takes me a week to get through a take-away sized container of soup. The dried goods I'll probably take with me - plenty of space in my new kitchen . Can't wait to pack up my gadgets and bakeware that never get used but equally I don't want to live amongst cardboard boxes for the next few weeks.

    I've got enough toiletries to last me a lifetime. Books are also relatively straightforward. I've got roughly 1,000 and lately have been adding at the rate of 25-30 a month. I am going to have to get a handle on my chazzer craziness. I'll make an exception for the books I've P'inned, but no more buying stuff. My plans are to furnish my excess space with thrifty "antique" furniture that fits in with the style of my new home, so there will be plenty of time for that in 2018. Which is just as well, as there isn't going to be much cash

    Throwing unwanted stuff is relatively easy. Now for the excess. Most of it is packed away in my loft, and I had the intention of getting rid of it. Every penny counts, so I can't afford to give it to charity / stick it on Freecycle . I always meant to start eBaying, but never quite got there. I know it will be straightforward when you get in the swing of things, but also that it requires organisation so how do people do it when they are working full time, commute and making a conscious effort to take time out to exercise? Especially as so much of it is brand new and unused from my glamorous days: shoes, handbags, lingerie and formal dresses. Pre-Christmas is the time it would sell. If I take it with me, it will just hang around for ages and make my new home look untidy.

    And so much kids stuff. What my niece doesn't need, I should get rid of. And then there is clearing the shed...!

    On top of that there is the day to day stuff, there's so much to think about! haven't submitted my tax return for last year, thats the worst job of the year and I hate it . Plus I was looking for another job and I guess that will have to go on hold for now. I know I'll need to create some sort of schedule as I can't afford to waste a single evening but I don't really know quite how to organise Sorting out post, and that sort of thing. And it sounds really silly, but I've got 12 chunky library books on loan to read before I move out of the borough. That takes time too

    It goes without saying that Christmas is cancelled (for me, anyway). I will get help around moving time but I need to make inroads well before then. How long will it take to pack up my home?

    I need to prioritise, and fast. Tried and tested tips, please? And help in keeping me on track....
    Last edited by VfM4meplse; 14-09-2017 at 9:59 PM.
    Value-for-money-for-me-puhleeze!

    "No man is worth, crawling on the earth"- adapted from Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio

    Hope is not a strategy ...A child is for life, not just 18 years....Don't get me started on the NHS, because you won't win...If in doubt, don't pull out... I love chaz-ing!
Page 3
    • freyasmum
    • By freyasmum 17th Sep 17, 12:09 AM
    • 16,620 Posts
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    freyasmum
    I'll be watching this thread with interest as we are also looking to move next year.

    My best bit of advice for the move itself is to make making your bed your priority when you first get in. I can guarantee that by the time bedtime comes, it will be the last thing you want to do.

    I also advise packing a box of tea/coffee/whatever you/anyone helping drinks with the kettle, cups and spoons. That way, you can easily have a cuppa without rooting through boxes.

    I would also sort things into keep/bin/sell piles as there is no point bringing something with you that you will never use again/just don't want.

    I self-moved over 400 miles last year, but had time to do a good few bootsales - sadly not much of an option at this time of year.

    We are currently ebaying lots of books, dvds and cds, as well as other random bits and pieces.

    Good luck
    • janb5
    • By janb5 17th Sep 17, 12:38 AM
    • 1,786 Posts
    • 6,377 Thanks
    janb5
    I echo most of the comments on here but would add that maybe you have a good friend who sells on Ebay who would take a few items for you?

    I sell periodically for friends but do not charge them and they buy me a cup of coffee or something nice as I am a private seller seller and this works for me.

    Also useful to borrow a good friend who will help with the sifting and stop you transferring a lot to your new home.

    Alternatively consider having a garage sale/fashion night and maybe donate a small amount to charity out of the proceeds?

    Good luck with your new venture- sounds soo exciting!
    • greenbee
    • By greenbee 17th Sep 17, 7:15 AM
    • 12,217 Posts
    • 215,964 Thanks
    greenbee
    I second the not paying to move stuff you don't need. I had a major clearour before my last move (4 years ago) having previously moved a lot of stuff that then got dumped. Even last time there was still some - but given that it's still a building site a lot of old stuff is in use for a reason!

    Do your tax return - mine took a lot less time than I spent procrastinating and I got a nice lump of cash straight back into my bank account.

    Re. selling stuff. Do you have time. There are a couple of options to consider. 1. If you are a higher rate tax payer you get the higher rate tax back on anything you gift aid, so donating might be the best option as you'll still get a return 2. If you're not paying higher rate tax and think the stuff you have to sell has value, find an eBay agent/dress agency or equivalent who will sell it for you.

    Books - keep the ones you know you will read again, and get rid of the rest. Think about how you use your books. My dad used a lot of his for reference (I use google mostly), whereas I use mine for reading in the bath (including library books).

    Food - invite friends over, particularly local ones who you may not see so much when you move. I did this and managed to have pretty much bare cupboards and empty freezers by the date of the move.

    Cleaning - I'm with you on leaving the place spotless (although I didn't paint anything, just left the pots of the correct colours behind), but bear in mind your vendors may not do so. This place was filthy. I ended up getting the movers to take my stuff a week before completion and paid them to store is for 2 weeks. I stayed with a friend taking minimal stuff, and cleaned the old house before completion and the new one after.

    Remember you still have to live in your house and that house sales are never predictable. So have a really good clear out and tidy, but don't pack too soon as you'll be living among boxes. Have a clearout (bin/CS) of the stuff that's out now (night before bin day each week, Friday evening before a CS trip every Saturday for example). Everything from your knicker drawer to the shed should be reviewed and cleaned/tidied. Then you can start bringing stuff down from the attic a box at a time and deciding what to do with it (keep, in which case put it away in some of the cleared space so it will pack with similar things; CS; bin; or sell - in which case you have to have worked out how you will sell it).

    Moving is stressful enough, so you need to be pragmatic about how you do this.

    And definitely sign up for the full time on the RM redirection. My vendors didn't and I still get post for them, much of which in the first couple of years was related to pensions, finances etc.
    • jackyann
    • By jackyann 17th Sep 17, 8:16 AM
    • 3,230 Posts
    • 6,572 Thanks
    jackyann
    Regarding selling: I would broadly agree that it is more bother than it's worth unless your finances are very stretched or you have some potentially valuable stuff.

    If you need to give it a go, start early (now) set a deadline, and if it hasn't gone, then off to the charity shop. Personally I found freecycle / freegle useful as they will collect the stuff. You can also get rid of a lot of stuff that charity shops won't / can't take (this may apply less to you than it did to me).
    I don't know if you have used Freecycle, but be very clear with replying eg: 'if I do not hear from you by 5pm Tuesday, the item will be re-offered'.
    Another option, which you might need to do soon, is a 'house / garage sale'. Depends on where you live etc.and you need to publicise.

    If you are likely to use your local tip, check the rules about opening times and number of visits. I got a special dispensation on number of visits as I was recycling and promised not to put any rubbish in! So for an entire house build + the clearances, we used only one skip.

    I think this thread has been interesting
    • kittie
    • By kittie 17th Sep 17, 8:49 AM
    • 11,306 Posts
    • 63,953 Thanks
    kittie
    I am just back from my local tip, it is a fab clean and large area and oh so helpful staff plus areas where I can put re-useable things.

    I will be leaving my house spotless but will not be painting and as a potentail buyer I would not be wanting to see any property tarted up to sell. I would say to get pictures and wall hangings off the walls as soon as feasible, remove screws and fill holes and make good, maybe there is a local odd job man who would do it

    I do think the post about a professional cleaner is a good one and one I personally will bear in mind for my move and yes a project plan is a very good idea
    • jackyann
    • By jackyann 17th Sep 17, 10:40 AM
    • 3,230 Posts
    • 6,572 Thanks
    jackyann
    I have done both - I had a professional cleaner for the last move as we were in the middle of the build and I felt my time was better used at the site. They actually cleaned 'overnight' - didn't charge any more as they had quoted a fixed price, but because of their deadlines, asked if possible. Neighbours agreed.

    I would get some quotes on which to base your decision. You could also, if the timing works, ask a neighbour or friend who would appreciate some cash, but ensure your 'public liability' insurance is in place. You may need to insure 2 properties for a short time - worth it as those times are 'trigger times' for thieves, sadly.
    • LameWolf
    • By LameWolf 17th Sep 17, 12:12 PM
    • 9,919 Posts
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    LameWolf
    Wolfy's mantra for deciding whether to keep or get rid....

    If in doubt,
    Turf it out!

    LameWolf
    If your dog thinks you're the best, don't seek a second opinion.
    • Valli
    • By Valli 17th Sep 17, 3:25 PM
    • 20,134 Posts
    • 228,734 Thanks
    Valli
    If you can get to an Ikea buy some of their packs of large white napkins or get some large kitchen rolls. Wrap kitchen pots etc. in these then you won't have to wash them on arrival. You can save the wrapping to use for wiping later.
    Make two - and freeze one!
    Don't put it DOWN - put it AWAY!
    DEBT ATTACK - Debts to attack 1-£6150.87 24/04/2017 £5303.03 22/07/2017 BT -
    £5342.65
    2 Virgin CC £585.88 31/7/2017 £494.88 11/8/2017
    • VfM4meplse
    • By VfM4meplse 17th Sep 17, 7:51 PM
    • 23,948 Posts
    • 50,269 Thanks
    VfM4meplse
    Days 3 and 4
    Yesterday was well-spent sorting out some paperwork but I seem to have taken a retrograde step today. I'm not too sure why I went into Wilkinsons, but here's what happened when I did:

    I got some great bargains today in the clearance aisle:

    - packets of sunflower seeds probably annuals for between 10-25p (the 75-80% discount only became apparent at the till).
    - other seeds for 35p, labelled suitable for KS2. I bought pumpkin and nasturnium
    - a 10m hose and reel, reduced to £4
    - a 2-way hose tap for 75p
    - a single hose tap for 25p
    - a twin pack of ant bait traps for 60p
    - 20m rolls of steel wire (intended for the garden, but I'll use it for crafting) for 40p each.

    My little niece has really enjoyed growing and tending to the sunflowers and tomatoes this year. Next year I predict a sea of sunflowers, nasturnium and pumpkins for Halloween. She'll sow them with me after her 3rd birthday in March, and then it will be her responsibility to keep them watered with her own hose
    Originally posted by VfM4meplse
    Its the excitement of having a huge south facing garden on the horizon

    I also found this online: 12 tips to de-clutter your home. Interesting, but I find the Kondo method works best for me. Once I get going, its addictive.
    Value-for-money-for-me-puhleeze!

    "No man is worth, crawling on the earth"- adapted from Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio

    Hope is not a strategy ...A child is for life, not just 18 years....Don't get me started on the NHS, because you won't win...If in doubt, don't pull out... I love chaz-ing!
    • short_bird
    • By short_bird 18th Sep 17, 11:14 AM
    • 1,836 Posts
    • 26,159 Thanks
    short_bird
    Have you got a crafting area, a container for seeds and/or a shed where you are now, so that lot can be herded into the right place?

    Oh, that's a thought. The right place! How much furniture are you moving and what's the storage situation at the new house? It occurred to me that you may have built in storage at one property and not at the other (like the incredibly handy cupboard at the top of the stairs in this flat...)
    Last edited by short_bird; 18-09-2017 at 11:29 AM.
    Cancel the kitchen scraps for lepers and orphans, no more merciful beheadings, and call off Christmas.
    • LameWolf
    • By LameWolf 18th Sep 17, 1:03 PM
    • 9,919 Posts
    • 106,528 Thanks
    LameWolf
    I also found this online: 12 tips to de-clutter your home. Interesting, but I find the Kondo method works best for me. Once I get going, its addictive.
    Originally posted by VfM4meplse
    That's the trick - finding what works for you and running with it.
    The Kondo method wouldn't work for me at all, because I'd never in a billion years get Mr LW on board with it; and if you're sharing space with someone, you need to agree on what goes and what stays, and how you're going to go about decluttering (unless the "someone" is your kids, in which case parents have the final say).

    For instance, I'd get rid of the tv and the umpteen radios in a heartbeat, but he'd never part with any of them.
    LameWolf
    If your dog thinks you're the best, don't seek a second opinion.
    • AElene
    • By AElene 18th Sep 17, 2:28 PM
    • 69 Posts
    • 355 Thanks
    AElene
    Regarding moving, I think there are companies who literally move everything for you, you don't even need to pack. They come in and pack it all up for you.

    Congrats, and I hope you will like it in sunny Essex I moved out of the county years ago but still have a few relatives living there, in the commuter belt bit.
    • White_musk
    • By White_musk 18th Sep 17, 5:38 PM
    • 30 Posts
    • 119 Thanks
    White_musk
    Regarding moving, I think there are companies who literally move everything for you, you don't even need to pack. They come in and pack it all up for you. .
    Originally posted by AElene
    Yes there are, this is what I plan using if the move I'm looking at goes ahead. I was actually pleasantly surprised at the price, a good bit cheaper than I thought it might be. They come in with all the boxes etc, pack up your home, put on the van then unpack at the other end.
    Last edited by White_musk; 18-09-2017 at 8:10 PM.
    God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can, wisdom to know the difference.
    • Doody
    • By Doody 18th Sep 17, 6:59 PM
    • 86 Posts
    • 192 Thanks
    Doody
    I don't do FB, as I value my privacy. I much prefer anonymous networks.
    Originally posted by VfM4meplse
    Good luck with all your packing and enjoy the move. To answer the point above. As far as privacy goes, FB does not mean you have to bare your soul in public and let the world know any of your details. You could sign up for an account, use a photo of some scene, or a teddy or something for your profile picture and not join any groups except for relevant selling ones. It would be worth it just to help you shift your excess.
    • VfM4meplse
    • By VfM4meplse 19th Sep 17, 6:27 PM
    • 23,948 Posts
    • 50,269 Thanks
    VfM4meplse
    Days 5 and 6
    Well I sorted out the solicitor and surveyor's initial paperwork yesterday and today spent what I thought would be a productive day working at home. Not least because the usual commute was replaced by a brisk 5 mile walk. How wrong I was...at 3.30pm I stuck the kettle on and nipped out to water the plants n my front garden, to be confronted by an unwanted visitor "just passing through". They refused to join me for a cuppa but made a point of telling me how just dreadful I look. I looked around me with fresh eyes when I came back in and realised I'd had a lucky escape: my home would also look dreadful to an outsider, on account of the many sorting "works in progress". Well all actual work came to a grinding halt after that. I stuck the radio on for 90 minutes and did a load of Kondo-ing to at least make the house look a bit more presentable. After that I have been glued to MSE.

    Am going to have a hot shower and pick up work where I left off, not an ideal way to spend my evening but at least I feel less stressed now.

    Re: crafting - yes, its called the shed and it is choccer so adds rather than detracts from my logistics
    Regarding moving, I think there are companies who literally move everything for you, you don't even need to pack. They come in and pack it all up for you.

    Congrats, and I hope you will like it in sunny Essex I moved out of the county years ago but still have a few relatives living there, in the commuter belt bit.
    Originally posted by AElene
    Much as I don't want to admit it, the issue for me is now the cost, I'm stretched out thinner that Looby-Lou for the foreseebale . I'm still (reasonably!) young and certainly fit enough to pack and lift so it is about being organised more than anything else. Can't wait to get back to Essex. I can't claim it as the land of my fore-fathers but I was born and raised there
    Value-for-money-for-me-puhleeze!

    "No man is worth, crawling on the earth"- adapted from Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio

    Hope is not a strategy ...A child is for life, not just 18 years....Don't get me started on the NHS, because you won't win...If in doubt, don't pull out... I love chaz-ing!
    • short_bird
    • By short_bird 20th Sep 17, 4:18 PM
    • 1,836 Posts
    • 26,159 Thanks
    short_bird
    Wow. Turns up in your garden and insults you. Just what anyone needs.

    Depends on your layout, but: would keeping one room "company ready" for the duration of the packing help you in 2 ways.
    1) you don't have to live like a hermit if folks do pop round unexpectedly;
    2) You have a refuge!

    And if you have space for a sorting room, even better.
    Cancel the kitchen scraps for lepers and orphans, no more merciful beheadings, and call off Christmas.
    • jackyann
    • By jackyann 20th Sep 17, 10:06 PM
    • 3,230 Posts
    • 6,572 Thanks
    jackyann
    Regarding moving, I think there are companies who literally move everything for you, you don't even need to pack. They come in and pack it all up for you.
    Originally posted by AElene
    I had a neighbour who had this service as part of her husband's 'company move'. They emptied the entire contents of drawers and would expect to put them back into the new drawer.
    Fast forward 35 years, and her 'bottom kitchen drawer'contains exactly the same stuff as when it was moved!
    • Lynplatinum
    • By Lynplatinum 20th Sep 17, 11:28 PM
    • 910 Posts
    • 17,495 Thanks
    Lynplatinum
    Ok sorry VfM4meplse but someone has to be the brave one.... (gulps)

    HAVE YOU DONE YOUR TAX RETURN YET???

    Intended me dear, as a friendly nag..... (friendly grin - wags tail??)

    tell you what, as soon as Im home next week (Wednesday) I ll let you know how mine progresses and we can encourage each other.

    Take care, keep going and chin up, mate.
    Nite all
    Aim for Sept 17: 20/30 days to be NSDs NSDs July 23/31 (aim 22)
    NSDs 2015:185/330 (allowing for hols etc)
    LBM: started Jan 2012 - still learning!
    Life gives us only lessons and gifts - learn the lesson and it becomes a gift.' from the Bohdavista
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 21st Sep 17, 8:13 AM
    • 11,365 Posts
    • 218,677 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    Some thoughts:

    1. Is your new home in any kind of controlled parking zone? Are their lines on the road where your removal van(s) etc will have to stop? Check and talk to the council in the new area if so.

    2. Check your 'get-in' at the new property, this was the term we used when I toured with a theatrical company. Some get-ins are a nightmare. Try to have as few steps as possible between where the vehicle will stop and the door the chattels will be carted through. Even an extra 10 feet will be multiplied tiresomely over the course of the unloading.

    3. As well as measuring the new rooms to check that any furniture/ appliances will fit, measure the doors they will have to go through to reach those rooms. Sometimes, they won't fit, and you don't want to be finding that out on the day. Sometimes, there will have to be a sharp angle to get from a hallway into a room and the piece won't go around it. Also watch out for dropped ceilings over stairwells, as these can prevent large things like wardrobes going up. And, if you have built large flat-pack furniture in your current home, it might not fit on the way out.

    All this sounds a bit tweaky, but I have spent time on the lower end of a wardrobe, with the sweating owner on the top as we tried to get it up her new stairs, among many other escapades. It gets old quickly.

    Oh, and also watch out for things like gate posts/ pillars which can restrict the passage of large items into or out of homes.

    I've hestitated to post this last bit, for fear of giving offence, as some of you many work yourself, or know people, in the removals business. But I feel I should mention it.

    Most people I know who have had professional removers pack and move them have had stuff disappear. Not vast amounts, one or so item per move, the kind of stuff which shares the following qualities; smallish, untraceable, relatively valuable but not the kind of thing you'd think to take especial security measures over, and the kind of things which wouldn't be among the first things missed. Examples include antique mirrors, stamp albums, things of that ilk.

    Sooo, be careful.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • VfM4meplse
    • By VfM4meplse 21st Sep 17, 8:38 AM
    • 23,948 Posts
    • 50,269 Thanks
    VfM4meplse
    Day 8
    My first bin day since the news! I normally have half a carrier-bag full of waste every week, this morning it was closer to half a black sack (merged in with a neighbour's, naturally ) - mucho satisfaction! Included 2 pairs of shoes which have been worn to death and I realised when walking in the rain had developed holes in the soles.

    All advice bring carefully noted, not ignored. There's value in it all!

    Re: TR - of course I haven't . I have boiled it down and it's actually the study that is going to take the longest to sort out and clear.
    Value-for-money-for-me-puhleeze!

    "No man is worth, crawling on the earth"- adapted from Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio

    Hope is not a strategy ...A child is for life, not just 18 years....Don't get me started on the NHS, because you won't win...If in doubt, don't pull out... I love chaz-ing!
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