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  • FIRST POST
    • segovia1
    • By segovia1 14th Sep 17, 3:46 PM
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    segovia1
    Planting ideas around compost area
    • #1
    • 14th Sep 17, 3:46 PM
    Planting ideas around compost area 14th Sep 17 at 3:46 PM
    Iím creating a new compost area at the back of my garden. It will be tucked away in one of the corners but a reasonable size (maybe 20ft by 20ft). Iím going to put some compost bins in the very back corner of the area against a wooden fence, but would like some ideas on what I could plant as a screen (Iíll also have some stepping stones to get from the lawn area of the garden to the compost area). The area is south facing but quite heavily shaded by trees belonging to my neighbour. And from the house (and most of the garden) the compost area wonít be visible. Partly because itís tucked away in the corner but also because a large shed will hide it. I was thinking bamboo as something that will be shade-tolerant and grow easily and not need too much tending. But any other thoughts? Perhaps thereís room for a couple of small trees - but what species to go for?
Page 1
    • -taff
    • By -taff 17th Sep 17, 7:55 PM
    • 7,113 Posts
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    -taff
    • #2
    • 17th Sep 17, 7:55 PM
    • #2
    • 17th Sep 17, 7:55 PM
    fruit trees? Whatever you plant in a compost area will probably go mental because of all the nutrients in the soil.
    • Silence101
    • By Silence101 18th Sep 17, 4:23 PM
    • 294 Posts
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    Silence101
    • #3
    • 18th Sep 17, 4:23 PM
    • #3
    • 18th Sep 17, 4:23 PM
    Not bamboo! It'll spread everywhere! Except if you plant it in pots possibly. It's also almost impossible to kill, so you might find it hard to control. Maybe a bush of some kind?
    09/17 Shared Ownership 50% share - Mortgage £77500 Original MFW 2052
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    • madjackslam
    • By madjackslam 20th Sep 17, 8:30 AM
    • 195 Posts
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    madjackslam
    • #4
    • 20th Sep 17, 8:30 AM
    • #4
    • 20th Sep 17, 8:30 AM
    -taff is right. My compost bins are surrounded by nettles, wild roses and brambles, all of which grow like crazy. I would suggest climbers that tolerate shade, such as honeysuckle. You really want non-thorny trees and shrubs, otherwise they are a pain (literally) when they start growing over your bins. I'd be tempted by hazel, hornbeam (which keeps its leaves on for a bit in the winter), or for something more decorative maybe cotinus?
    • Farway
    • By Farway 20th Sep 17, 10:24 AM
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    Farway
    • #5
    • 20th Sep 17, 10:24 AM
    • #5
    • 20th Sep 17, 10:24 AM
    Black or other currants?

    They love rich soils and can be left to just get on with it, or you can prune if you want to
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 20th Sep 17, 3:59 PM
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    glasgowdan
    • #6
    • 20th Sep 17, 3:59 PM
    • #6
    • 20th Sep 17, 3:59 PM
    My customer's compost areas are surrounded by things such as Laurel and Rhododendrons. Nice plants, in leaf all year and easy to maintain.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 22nd Sep 17, 7:38 AM
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    Davesnave
    • #7
    • 22nd Sep 17, 7:38 AM
    • #7
    • 22nd Sep 17, 7:38 AM
    Not bamboo! It'll spread everywhere! Except if you plant it in pots possibly. It's also almost impossible to kill, so you might find it hard to control. Maybe a bush of some kind?
    Originally posted by Silence101
    People who don't know there are essentially two types of bamboo always say this. The clumping varieties don't spread and therefore cost a lot. The RHS use them in a garden near me, but what do they know about plants, eh?

    My customer's compost areas are surrounded by things such as Laurel and Rhododendrons. Nice plants, in leaf all year and easy to maintain.
    Originally posted by glasgowdan
    Laurel is quicker, though not as nice as eleagnus ebbingei or prunus lusitanica, but they'll all grow in shaded conditions, as will viburnum tinus. Rhododendrons, unlike the others, won't grow everywhere. If the soil is notably alkaline, they will die; not that DIY sheds and similar places selling them nationwide will care!
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 22nd Sep 17, 1:49 PM
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    glasgowdan
    • #8
    • 22nd Sep 17, 1:49 PM
    • #8
    • 22nd Sep 17, 1:49 PM

    Laurel is quicker, though not as nice as eleagnus ebbingei or prunus lusitanica, !
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    That depends on the eye of whoever is looking at them!
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 22nd Sep 17, 1:59 PM
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    Davesnave
    • #9
    • 22nd Sep 17, 1:59 PM
    • #9
    • 22nd Sep 17, 1:59 PM
    That depends on the eye of whoever is looking at them!
    Originally posted by glasgowdan
    Very true. Just sharing my opinion, having used them all. Other opinions are available.

    But even among laurels there are clones that are 'better' than others, in the sense that they are more dense, have more interesting foliage and cost more. e.g 'Etna.'

    The neighbour I don't like gets the bog-standard, self sown stuff from the roadside on his boundary!
    Last edited by Davesnave; 22-09-2017 at 2:42 PM. Reason: punctuation
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 24th Sep 17, 4:39 PM
    • 23,240 Posts
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    Jojo the Tightfisted
    Iím creating a new compost area at the back of my garden. It will be tucked away in one of the corners but a reasonable size (maybe 20ft by 20ft). Iím going to put some compost bins in the very back corner of the area against a wooden fence, but would like some ideas on what I could plant as a screen (Iíll also have some stepping stones to get from the lawn area of the garden to the compost area). The area is south facing but quite heavily shaded by trees belonging to my neighbour. And from the house (and most of the garden) the compost area wonít be visible. Partly because itís tucked away in the corner but also because a large shed will hide it. I was thinking bamboo as something that will be shade-tolerant and grow easily and not need too much tending. But any other thoughts? Perhaps thereís room for a couple of small trees - but what species to go for?
    Originally posted by segovia1
    Something useful. Laurel is of no use to man nor beast, for example, and nowt grows underneath due to the toxic chemicals the plant contains - it also requires continued management to ensure it doesn't become a bloody great tree, a massive bush or, as it spreads easily through layering, root runs or just leaving a chopped bit on the ground by accident, it just invades the entire garden.

    Could you perhaps look at various fruit trees? You can get grafted apple, for example, where you get different varieties on one relatively small tree; maybe hazel would be a plan - if looked after, you could supply your own plant sticks within a few years or just enjoy the nuts the squirrels and jays don't get. Or a dwarf cherry? That way you get blossom and fruit fairly quickly - and as it still gets sun, but is sheltered, the fruit is more likely to be able to ripen undiscovered by pigeons.


    Because I want the security of something with evil spikes attached, I've got a Pyracantha in a completely shaded spot against the wall and shed - all I do is lop off the horizontals to stop it spreading sideways and there's nesting and food for bugs and birds in one go - something like Blackthorn would be great, especially if you like sloe gin - if I had thought about it longer at the time, I'd have planted that instead.
    I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die: I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by.

    Yup you are officially Rock n Roll
    Originally posted by colinw
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 24th Sep 17, 7:41 PM
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    Davesnave
    . Laurel is of no use to man nor beast, for example, and nowt grows underneath due to the toxic chemicals the plant contains - it also requires continued management to ensure it doesn't become a bloody great tree, a massive bush or, as it spreads easily through layering, root runs or just leaving a chopped bit on the ground by accident, it just invades the entire garden.
    Originally posted by Jojo the Tightfisted
    Hate to disagree, but there are clones that don't do that. Like bamboo, laurels all get tarred with the same brush.

    This one, for example, has an AGM:

    https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/99043/Prunus-laurocerasus-Otto-Luyken/Details

    There is a place for fast-growing, sound-absorbing, screening evergreens, but I'll admit the wildlife credentials of laurel are pretty poor. Even the lowly leylandii is good for nesting.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 24th Sep 17, 8:42 PM
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    glasgowdan
    Laurel is properly easy to look after and will support bird, bug and critter life. It's a great screen for a dirty area of the garden. An annual trim like a hedge and you're done.
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 24th Sep 17, 9:21 PM
    • 23,240 Posts
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    Jojo the Tightfisted
    Hate to disagree, but there are clones that don't do that. Like bamboo, laurels all get tarred with the same brush.

    This one, for example, has an AGM:

    https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/99043/Prunus-laurocerasus-Otto-Luyken/Details

    There is a place for fast-growing, sound-absorbing, screening evergreens, but I'll admit the wildlife credentials of laurel are pretty poor. Even the lowly leylandii is good for nesting.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    Cherry Laurel? That's what takes up the majority of wildlife/ecological trusts' work round here, as it completely crowds out all the useful native species and kills off all the woodland wildflowers. I've felled enough of the blasted things this year and never had so much as a spider come out of them or scuttle across the ground, either - get rid and have native species - Cherry Plum, Holly, Blackthorn, Hawthorn, etc - and you're inundated with happily nesting birds, non poisonous fruit for human and/or wildlife plus critters galore to eat any caterpillars, grubs, moths or spiders and pollinators to ensure the garden is full of life and food.
    I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die: I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by.

    Yup you are officially Rock n Roll
    Originally posted by colinw
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 25th Sep 17, 9:24 AM
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    Davesnave
    Unfortunately, when one has a noisy, aggressive, slightly unhinged neighbour, the wildlife credentials of what one places on their boundary becomes a secondary consideration.

    However, there's 1/2 km of other native stuff, so no worries for the wee animals.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 25th Sep 17, 10:13 AM
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    • 90,212 Thanks
    Jojo the Tightfisted
    Unfortunately, when one has a noisy, aggressive, slightly unhinged neighbour, the wildlife credentials of what one places on their boundary becomes a secondary consideration.

    However, there's 1/2 km of other native stuff, so no worries for the wee animals.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    Holly appeals to me in such situations. Or anything else that has big, sharp, pointy bits. No crown lifting there
    I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die: I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by.

    Yup you are officially Rock n Roll
    Originally posted by colinw
    • segovia1
    • By segovia1 3rd Oct 17, 2:18 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    segovia1
    Thank you for all the responses. Because of other commitments I've put the work off until next year but will definitely be taking on board lots of these helpful comments.
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