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  • FIRST POST
    • ric1982
    • By ric1982 14th Sep 17, 2:09 PM
    • 61Posts
    • 5Thanks
    ric1982
    Buying a house and school.
    • #1
    • 14th Sep 17, 2:09 PM
    Buying a house and school. 14th Sep 17 at 2:09 PM
    Hi,

    We are looking for a house in a perticular area in Birmingham. The house we are looking at has only one outstanding primary school and there is no good secondary school. We will be moving in middle of the school as my son is already 6 years old and in year 2. The primary school near the place where we are moving is very popular hence over subscribed. Unfortunately any other school in the area hasnt got good reputation. Now the house is quite nearby so we have been told that my son will be in top of the waiting list (may be not first be in top 5 for e.g.).

    This being said there is no guarantee that he will get into this school. School is obeviously a high priority item in the list with our house move. Does anyone has any openion if this is good move considering there is no good secondary school and primary school that we can get into have waiting list?

    Any inputs are much appriciated.

    Thanks
Page 2
    • SingleSue
    • By SingleSue 15th Sep 17, 1:30 PM
    • 9,884 Posts
    • 55,241 Thanks
    SingleSue
    I'm pleased to see someone else here with some appreciation of what primary schools set out to do and the importance of the early years.

    I was beginning to think from previous comments that I'd just spent half my life as little more than a child minder!

    Primaries do much more than just 'the basics' when the situation allows.

    Of course, the secondary school matters, but matters more? In the eyes of those who see education as a product, rather than a process, it probably does, but there's a significant link between performance at entry and attainment later in those GCSEs and A levels.

    Yes, a good secondary will help a child to catch-up. Too often, however, a matter that needs addressing is why progress tails-off for huge numbers of children in the early secondary years, not how they can make up for primary school inadequacies. That's a different debate, though!
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    It was thanks to an excellent junior school that my middle son was able (albeit with a huge amount of support), to go to a mainstream high school. They worked tirelessly with both youngest and me to ensure he stayed within mainstream education and never ever gave up on him adopting all different strategies until they found one which worked (part time attendance until part way through year 6, different time arrivals and departures etc).

    Without their determination and hard work, I wouldn't be dropping youngest off for his start at university tomorrow.
    Keep battling on, I will get there eventually..even if I don't know where there is! Eldests' diagnosis (4.5.10) is Ehlers Danlos Hypermobility type and now it looks like I have it too (13.1.11) eekk!
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 15th Sep 17, 2:59 PM
    • 23,137 Posts
    • 88,496 Thanks
    Davesnave
    It was thanks to an excellent junior school that my middle son was able (albeit with a huge amount of support), to go to a mainstream high school.

    Without their determination and hard work, I wouldn't be dropping youngest off for his start at university tomorrow.
    Originally posted by SingleSue
    Oddly, it was the other way around for us. The primary school I worked in was officially 'good' and enjoyed very high levels of parental support, but it didn't handle our daughter's special needs particularly well. Had it not been for Mum's tireless work at home, she would have left there almost illiterate. Mum intervened when the special needs unit went through a bad patch due to staffing issues.

    Secondary level began shakily too. A similar situation prevailed, with the special needs unit in difficulties, due to experienced staff retiring or moving-on. Daughter, smart enough to read the situation for herself, went into polite refusenik mode as regards the special needs unit and stayed in class. This was in the 'best' state school in the city at the time, as measured by exam results.

    Thankfully, by year 8, through work at home, daughter had enough skills to cope OK in mainstream. A couple of very inspiring teachers spotted her latent talent, so the situation was saved, but it was a very close-run thing!

    That's why bouicca's comment chimes with me:

    "What matters is the fit between your child and the school."

    Unfortunately, exam results, and even other parents' or children's experiences, won't always be a reliable indicator of this.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 15th Sep 17, 3:30 PM
    • 8,229 Posts
    • 4,897 Thanks
    teddysmum
    With the change of just one person, a school can change completely in a few months.


    I once did supply work in a school where the head had no respect for staff and refused to have special needs children statemented as he thought that was a reflection on himself.


    One family had a child in every year (2 classes per year) so half the staff had a disruptive pupil (the worst of whom intimidated classmates, as she would destroy their work, but the head refused to have her removed from the room).


    Children gave up because class time was unpleasant and staff were regularly absent through stress.


    I didn't go there for several months, but did have one day's work as the head was on a course.


    The difference was unbelievable.


    The head retired and the very much respected and respectful deputy took his job. Everything was organised, special needs help was provided and there was a happy feeling about the place, with the little girl getting the help she needed, in a special unit .


    The staff were more relaxed, as were the children , who now had pride and were eager to impress the new head. There were few staff absences (hence this was my last job there).


    The school was praised in an inspection report ; all down to just one person, as one of the staff explained and they still called her by her first name as she'd been a colleague for years. They were like a happy family and I would have loved a job there.
    • SingleSue
    • By SingleSue 15th Sep 17, 11:35 PM
    • 9,884 Posts
    • 55,241 Thanks
    SingleSue
    Oddly, it was the other way around for us. The primary school I worked in was officially 'good' and enjoyed very high levels of parental support, but it didn't handle our daughter's special needs particularly well. Had it not been for Mum's tireless work at home, she would have left there almost illiterate. Mum intervened when the special needs unit went through a bad patch due to staffing issues.

    Secondary level began shakily too. A similar situation prevailed, with the special needs unit in difficulties, due to experienced staff retiring or moving-on. Daughter, smart enough to read the situation for herself, went into polite refusenik mode as regards the special needs unit and stayed in class. This was in the 'best' state school in the city at the time, as measured by exam results.

    Thankfully, by year 8, through work at home, daughter had enough skills to cope OK in mainstream. A couple of very inspiring teachers spotted her latent talent, so the situation was saved, but it was a very close-run thing!

    That's why bouicca's comment chimes with me:

    "What matters is the fit between your child and the school."

    Unfortunately, exam results, and even other parents' or children's experiences, won't always be a reliable indicator of this.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    Youngest's junior school that had been so excellent for him was actually not very highly thought of, it was just me saying it was good.

    His experience at senior school left a lot to be desired, it was ok for the first 3 years but then it became an academy and things went downhill fast with youngest consigned to the rubbish bin due to a prognosis made when he was still pre school. I moved him after GCSEs to a college rated outstanding (and it is indeed outstanding) and despite not meeting the conditions for entry, someone there noticed there was something about him they just couldn't turn down so accepted him but with the proviso he repeated a GCSE year before moving onto level 3.

    He was their top student for all bar the first two months of level 3 after being labelled a failure at his high school.
    Keep battling on, I will get there eventually..even if I don't know where there is! Eldests' diagnosis (4.5.10) is Ehlers Danlos Hypermobility type and now it looks like I have it too (13.1.11) eekk!
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