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  • FIRST POST
    • Lmsmith
    • By Lmsmith 14th Sep 17, 1:24 PM
    • 2Posts
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    Lmsmith
    Speeding ticket with motobility car
    • #1
    • 14th Sep 17, 1:24 PM
    Speeding ticket with motobility car 14th Sep 17 at 1:24 PM
    So, I got a motobility car in may this year. I have been driving 12 years with no incident s but today I had a speeding ticket in the post I'm so upset, I am a very careful driver and don't intentionally speed any where.

    Does anyone know if I get points on my licence will my motobility car be taken away? I don't know what I will do without that car
Page 1
    • waamo
    • By waamo 14th Sep 17, 1:28 PM
    • 2,016 Posts
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    waamo
    • #2
    • 14th Sep 17, 1:28 PM
    • #2
    • 14th Sep 17, 1:28 PM
    If you were just a little over the limit you should get offered a speed awareness course. If you accept the course there are no points.
    This space for hire.
    • Lmsmith
    • By Lmsmith 14th Sep 17, 1:30 PM
    • 2 Posts
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    Lmsmith
    • #3
    • 14th Sep 17, 1:30 PM
    • #3
    • 14th Sep 17, 1:30 PM
    So if I can go on the course then do I have to let motobility know or is that just if I get points ?
    • waamo
    • By waamo 14th Sep 17, 1:35 PM
    • 2,016 Posts
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    waamo
    • #4
    • 14th Sep 17, 1:35 PM
    • #4
    • 14th Sep 17, 1:35 PM
    Generally speaking you don't have to tell anybody about the course (one insurance group ie Admiral ask but no others) but check your contract first.
    This space for hire.
    • Stoke
    • By Stoke 14th Sep 17, 1:38 PM
    • 1,838 Posts
    • 649 Thanks
    Stoke
    • #5
    • 14th Sep 17, 1:38 PM
    • #5
    • 14th Sep 17, 1:38 PM
    Admiral, Bell, Elephant, basically that group of insurers like to know (although are you even under obligation to tell them). The rest don't care.

    The course is worth the money to avoid points.
    • George Michael
    • By George Michael 14th Sep 17, 2:32 PM
    • 2,834 Posts
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    George Michael
    • #6
    • 14th Sep 17, 2:32 PM
    • #6
    • 14th Sep 17, 2:32 PM
    Admiral, Bell, Elephant, basically that group of insurers like to know (although are you even under obligation to tell them)
    Originally posted by Stoke
    As with any questions asked when taking out insurance, if they ask then yes, you are under a legal obligation to inform them.
    If you are asked and lie about the course it's unlikely that they will find out but this doesn't absolve you from the need to answer truthfully.
    • Stoke
    • By Stoke 14th Sep 17, 3:27 PM
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    Stoke
    • #7
    • 14th Sep 17, 3:27 PM
    • #7
    • 14th Sep 17, 3:27 PM
    As with any questions asked when taking out insurance, if they ask then yes, you are under a legal obligation to inform them.
    If you are asked and lie about the course it's unlikely that they will find out but this doesn't absolve you from the need to answer truthfully.
    Originally posted by George Michael
    But the whole point of the courses is that you don't have to declare it.
    • Mercdriver
    • By Mercdriver 14th Sep 17, 3:32 PM
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    Mercdriver
    • #8
    • 14th Sep 17, 3:32 PM
    • #8
    • 14th Sep 17, 3:32 PM
    But the whole point of the courses is that you don't have to declare it.
    Originally posted by Stoke

    No it's not. It's in lieu of points not instead of keeping to your contractual and legal obligations.
    • Car 54
    • By Car 54 14th Sep 17, 3:58 PM
    • 2,229 Posts
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    Car 54
    • #9
    • 14th Sep 17, 3:58 PM
    • #9
    • 14th Sep 17, 3:58 PM
    But the whole point of the courses is that you don't have to declare it.
    Originally posted by Stoke
    Not according to the organisers "The main aim of the course is to prevent motorists re-offending i.e. doing the same thing again."

    If an insurer asks, you are obliged to answer truthfully. Although there is no way at present for the insurer to check, that may change.
    • Stoke
    • By Stoke 14th Sep 17, 4:10 PM
    • 1,838 Posts
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    Stoke
    Meh. Just don't go with one that asks. Bell, Admiral and Elephant have never been that cheap anyway...
    • Aretnap
    • By Aretnap 14th Sep 17, 4:25 PM
    • 2,720 Posts
    • 2,163 Thanks
    Aretnap
    Meh. Just don't go with one that asks. Bell, Admiral and Elephant have never been that cheap anyway...
    Originally posted by Stoke
    Given it's a Motability car the OP doesn't have much choice about who insures it with. It will be insured through RSA who require "Full details of any motoring convictions, licence endorsements, fixed penalty notices and claims in the last five years." A speed awareness course doesn't come under any of those headings, so would not have to be declared.

    FWIW even if you didn't get the course, it's extremely unlikely that a single speeding ticket would result in RSA refusing to insure you. If you started to get a lot of tickets, or you were convicted of more serious offences, then you might have more of a problem.
    • Nilrem
    • By Nilrem 15th Sep 17, 3:08 AM
    • 2,306 Posts
    • 1,503 Thanks
    Nilrem

    FWIW even if you didn't get the course, it's extremely unlikely that a single speeding ticket would result in RSA refusing to insure you. If you started to get a lot of tickets, or you were convicted of more serious offences, then you might have more of a problem.
    Originally posted by Aretnap
    Aye, given the percentage of the population who have at least one speeding ticket I don't think Motorbility will care as long as they/the insurance are informed of it and it is just a simple speeding conviction.

    If it was up to 9 points or something serious they might refuse to allow the op to drive or require them to no longer driver it but have a different driver instead.

    I
    • moggy12
    • By moggy12 15th Sep 17, 8:05 AM
    • 44 Posts
    • 16 Thanks
    moggy12
    i have a motability car had speeding fine through post has you are not the owner of car the speeding fine will be sent to motability then back out to you so they will know about yout fine and rsa insurance will know be honest you will not have your car taken away and like other people say its only when you get 6-9 points they can refuse a new application for a motability car hope this helps
    • macman
    • By macman 15th Sep 17, 10:13 AM
    • 41,291 Posts
    • 16,954 Thanks
    macman
    OP, since you have already received the notice, you will know how far over the limit you were. Post that and someone will advise if you will be offered a speed awareness course.
    Lack of 'intention to speed' is unfortunately not a valid defence.
    No free lunch, and no free laptop
    • Guest101
    • By Guest101 15th Sep 17, 10:17 AM
    • 15,147 Posts
    • 14,752 Thanks
    Guest101
    i have a motability car had speeding fine through post has you are not the owner of car the speeding fine will be sent to motability then back out to you so they will know about yout fine and rsa insurance will know be honest you will not have your car taken away and like other people say its only when you get 6-9 points they can refuse a new application for a motability car hope this helps
    Originally posted by moggy12


    -* registered keeper


    and not necessarily, a speeding 'fine' as you call it, is not an indication of guilt.
    • Car 54
    • By Car 54 15th Sep 17, 10:36 AM
    • 2,229 Posts
    • 1,429 Thanks
    Car 54
    -* registered keeper


    and not necessarily, a speeding 'fine' as you call it, is not an indication of guilt.
    Originally posted by Guest101
    Exactly. All Motability will know is that someone driving the car is accused of the offence. They will not know the identity of the driver, nor the outcome. And even if they did, I don't believe they could inform RSA.
    • Indout96
    • By Indout96 15th Sep 17, 2:48 PM
    • 1,683 Posts
    • 2,317 Thanks
    Indout96
    Aye, given the percentage of the population who have at least one speeding ticket I don't think Motorbility will care as long as they/the insurance are informed of it and it is just a simple speeding conviction.

    I
    Originally posted by Nilrem
    If only - I got my first (SP30) one in February after 37 years clean licence - Insurance informed mid term as per conditions. had to pay an extra £60 for 7 months of policy left so well over £100 pro rata for 12 months. policy was £402 so thats a 25% increase.
    Over 10 years NCB - only this one SP30 ever (no course ect)
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    • onomatopoeia99
    • By onomatopoeia99 15th Sep 17, 3:21 PM
    • 3,338 Posts
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    onomatopoeia99
    If an insurer asks, you are obliged to answer truthfully. Although there is no way at present for the insurer to check, that may change.
    Originally posted by Car 54
    If it's a consumer contract of insurance, the insurer has to ask.

    If it's a business contract of insurance, the policyholder / applicant has to declare anything that may affect the insurer's assessment of risk, even if not asked. Carter vs Boehm applies, it established the legal concept of uberrimae fidei (utmost good faith) in all insurance contracts.

    The situation was the same for consumer contracts of insurance until a few years ago, until a new law governing consumer insurance was introduced which meant the precedent no longer applied..
    INTP, nerd, libertarian and scifi geek.
    Home is where my books are.
    • Car 54
    • By Car 54 15th Sep 17, 4:21 PM
    • 2,229 Posts
    • 1,429 Thanks
    Car 54
    If it's a consumer contract of insurance, the insurer has to ask.

    If it's a business contract of insurance, the policyholder / applicant has to declare anything that may affect the insurer's assessment of risk, even if not asked. Carter vs Boehm applies, it established the legal concept of uberrimae fidei (utmost good faith) in all insurance contracts.

    The situation was the same for consumer contracts of insurance until a few years ago, until a new law governing consumer insurance was introduced which meant the precedent no longer applied..
    Originally posted by onomatopoeia99
    Interesting, but of no help to the OP.
    • bigadaj
    • By bigadaj 16th Sep 17, 6:59 AM
    • 9,961 Posts
    • 6,359 Thanks
    bigadaj
    If only - I got my first (SP30) one in February after 37 years clean licence - Insurance informed mid term as per conditions. had to pay an extra £60 for 7 months of policy left so well over £100 pro rata for 12 months. policy was £402 so thats a 25% increase.
    Over 10 years NCB - only this one SP30 ever (no course ect)
    Originally posted by Indout96
    Your footer doesn't really help your post.
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