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    • Simba-ali34
    • By Simba-ali34 13th Sep 17, 10:48 PM
    • 133Posts
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    Simba-ali34
    flooring standard
    • #1
    • 13th Sep 17, 10:48 PM
    flooring standard 13th Sep 17 at 10:48 PM
    Hello,

    So i have recently purchased a new build shared ownership property, overall the snagging issues seem to be limited (so far!) but i do have one issue that i'm not sure is acceptable or not. ....The squeaks and cracking sounds coming from some of the floors. I have reported a big squeak in one of the bedrooms with the builder who is coming in a few weeks to put more screws in the floorboard (this one is really bad)

    My main question is what kind of standard can i expect from new build floors? i don't want to be overly critical noticing every little creak and report them if there is minimal chance they will do anything, plus there is the issue of carpets which are fully fitted and a pain to take up. Are a couple of low squeaks to be expected and lived with? and how likely are they to get worse? also the the level of noise you hear in the rooms underneath seems to be worse than previous houses ive lived in (1980s), is this common in houses being built 2016/2017?

    Kind Regards
Page 1
    • anselld
    • By anselld 14th Sep 17, 6:30 AM
    • 5,280 Posts
    • 4,812 Thanks
    anselld
    • #2
    • 14th Sep 17, 6:30 AM
    • #2
    • 14th Sep 17, 6:30 AM
    In a newbuild house it will be chipboard flooring. They only speak if they have not been glued together as their should be. Unfortunately this error is impossible to rectify afterwards. More screws may help but it's a bodge.
    • Mutton Geoff
    • By Mutton Geoff 14th Sep 17, 8:25 AM
    • 866 Posts
    • 912 Thanks
    Mutton Geoff
    • #3
    • 14th Sep 17, 8:25 AM
    • #3
    • 14th Sep 17, 8:25 AM
    Chipboard flooring is awful and a cheap construction method. It is very difficult to get up in the event you want to run something under later (new heating, satellite cables, alarm cables etc). Especially if the builder had put glue on the joists.

    A bit disruptive but pulling carpets and relaying is not that bad but any remedy will be a bodge. The skirtings will have gone in after the chipboard so a proper job will involve removing and replacing them as well.

    A friend who bought a new build in London (ie expensive so he had the budget), pulled up all the upstairs chipboard and replaced with proper seasoned floorboards to get rid of the creaking.
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    • Simba-ali34
    • By Simba-ali34 14th Sep 17, 10:25 AM
    • 133 Posts
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    Simba-ali34
    • #4
    • 14th Sep 17, 10:25 AM
    • #4
    • 14th Sep 17, 10:25 AM
    One area it's awful, I definitely want that sorted. Are chipboard floors common in new builds? Im Assuming creaking and squeaky floors is quite a common occurance these days then? Also I have a creak on one of the winders, I hear new build stairs are awful. Can stairs buckle?
    • hazyjo
    • By hazyjo 14th Sep 17, 10:58 AM
    • 9,532 Posts
    • 12,019 Thanks
    hazyjo
    • #5
    • 14th Sep 17, 10:58 AM
    • #5
    • 14th Sep 17, 10:58 AM
    I was going to mention the stairs - that's the thing I notice with newer houses. My last house wasn't too bad, but the one we viewed before it on the same estate was horrendous! Actually, that alone was enough to put me off (although there were other factors). The floors in mine were fine although I have no idea what flooring was used.


    I would definitely be getting them to try and sort it. I'm sure it's the sort of thing that will get progressively worse. What are these houses all going to be like in 50 years' time?!
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    • Simba-ali34
    • By Simba-ali34 14th Sep 17, 11:04 AM
    • 133 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    Simba-ali34
    • #6
    • 14th Sep 17, 11:04 AM
    • #6
    • 14th Sep 17, 11:04 AM
    Yea that's what I was thinking, if I am getting creaks after 3 months it doesn't fill me with much hope for the next 40 years!
    • ToasterScheme
    • By ToasterScheme 14th Sep 17, 12:53 PM
    • 70 Posts
    • 65 Thanks
    ToasterScheme
    • #7
    • 14th Sep 17, 12:53 PM
    • #7
    • 14th Sep 17, 12:53 PM
    One area it's awful, I definitely want that sorted. Are chipboard floors common in new builds? Im Assuming creaking and squeaky floors is quite a common occurance these days then? Also I have a creak on one of the winders, I hear new build stairs are awful. Can stairs buckle?
    Originally posted by Simba-ali34
    Yep - chip floors are almost ubiquitous in new builds, and as others have said, forget about making alterations to wiring or plumbing! [Well you'll have to cut the floor out and replace it. It can be easier to hack holes in the ceiling below because that's actually easier (and better) than splitting your floor - you don't walk on the ceiling after all.]

    Worst case, the floor has been nailed down, rather than screwed. The boards can slide up and down any loose nails much more readily - with horrendous scraping noise. Adding screws will help a lot if this is what you've got.

    Finally, yes stairs can buckle. Watch closely as a heavy friend walks up and down. Movement is not a major problem, but it makes sealing the crack between the side of the stairs and the wall very difficult - you'll need very flexible sealing material and a very wide bead of it.
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