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  • FIRST POST
    • Paddy McGinty
    • By Paddy McGinty 13th Sep 17, 7:16 PM
    • 6Posts
    • 0Thanks
    Paddy McGinty
    Old dog, strange behaviour.
    • #1
    • 13th Sep 17, 7:16 PM
    Old dog, strange behaviour. 13th Sep 17 at 7:16 PM
    Hope someone who's experienced this, might shine a light on what my old dog is going through and how to help us. I wrote about Jaffa's death and Paddy's adoption years back.







    I adopted him aged 9 I was told, a Cocker Spaniel. So 16 or 17now is the Vet's estimate.




    He is now completely blind due to cataracts.






    He's happy. We go on short walks, always on lead, he has a new garden to explore, banging his head along the way until I guide him to the step.




    My problem is he won't stay in the same room as me.


    He has two beds. One in the kitchen and the other beside me in the sitting room.


    He won't leave his bed in the kitchen. Last night I tried to get him in with me and stroked him. He couldn't wait to escape back to his kitchen bed.
    What to do?
Page 1
    • Alter ego
    • By Alter ego 13th Sep 17, 7:20 PM
    • 2,074 Posts
    • 1,985 Thanks
    Alter ego
    • #2
    • 13th Sep 17, 7:20 PM
    • #2
    • 13th Sep 17, 7:20 PM
    Let him lie in the kitchen bed.
    Ignore me if you like, it's not the real me anyway.
    • Paddy McGinty
    • By Paddy McGinty 13th Sep 17, 8:36 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Paddy McGinty
    • #3
    • 13th Sep 17, 8:36 PM
    • #3
    • 13th Sep 17, 8:36 PM
    Let him lie in the kitchen bed.
    Originally posted by Alter ego
    The kitchen space will be no more as the Council will be ripping it out.
    I'm asking why he won't engage anymore with me? Dogs, especially when old or sick mostly want to be close to their owner.


    If he was depressed, I'd think about PTS, but he's happy and loves his Orijen, followed by a treat.
    Its the disengage that's doing me. I want my dog beside me to stroke and cuddle.


    What's the point of a dog who I only see at meal times? I love him of course I do, but why won't he come in the same room as me? I'm asking really, is he preparing to die? Is this why he's separating himself from me?
    • thorsoak
    • By thorsoak 13th Sep 17, 8:39 PM
    • 5,451 Posts
    • 24,788 Thanks
    thorsoak
    • #4
    • 13th Sep 17, 8:39 PM
    • #4
    • 13th Sep 17, 8:39 PM
    It shouldn't be about what you want, after all this time - it should be about what he wants. However, if there is going to be a problem when the council will be ripping out the kitchen, then move his kitchen bed into your bedroom. That is obviously the bed he prefers. Just don't over-think things.
    • McKneff
    • By McKneff 13th Sep 17, 9:01 PM
    • 35,521 Posts
    • 45,718 Thanks
    McKneff
    • #5
    • 13th Sep 17, 9:01 PM
    • #5
    • 13th Sep 17, 9:01 PM
    Any reason why he is not being treated for his cataracys. I presume they are no different to human ones
    No one can make you feel inferior without your consent
    • krlyr
    • By krlyr 13th Sep 17, 9:24 PM
    • 5,776 Posts
    • 11,911 Thanks
    krlyr
    • #6
    • 13th Sep 17, 9:24 PM
    • #6
    • 13th Sep 17, 9:24 PM
    Dogs can suffer canine dementia which can cause unusual behaviours. If you haven't already, an MOT at the vet to check for new or changes in existing health issues is worthwhile with any change in behaviour.
    • dandy-candy
    • By dandy-candy 14th Sep 17, 10:17 AM
    • 1,645 Posts
    • 8,601 Thanks
    dandy-candy
    • #7
    • 14th Sep 17, 10:17 AM
    • #7
    • 14th Sep 17, 10:17 AM
    I doubt it's anything to do with you, could it be that something is different in the sitting room? Does he maybe not like the noise of the TV? Or is the kitchen warmer? Or maybe he likes being near his water and food bowls?
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 14th Sep 17, 1:51 PM
    • 1,636 Posts
    • 4,374 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    • #8
    • 14th Sep 17, 1:51 PM
    • #8
    • 14th Sep 17, 1:51 PM
    Any reason why he is not being treated for his cataracys. I presume they are no different to human ones
    Originally posted by McKneff
    My dog has them too, my vet said they don't tend to do anything about them as sight is not nearly as important to dogs as to humans, and the stress/risk/pain/recovery period is not worth it for them.

    They do adapt, smell is their main sense I think, followed by hearing.
    • sheramber
    • By sheramber 14th Sep 17, 8:41 PM
    • 3,576 Posts
    • 2,657 Thanks
    sheramber
    • #9
    • 14th Sep 17, 8:41 PM
    • #9
    • 14th Sep 17, 8:41 PM
    Cost is a big factor in surgery for cataracts in dogs. Not all are suitable for surgery.

    Surgery would be a unlikely for an elderly who would need an aneasthetic.

    When a dog loses one sense the other senses become more alert so he may be upset by some noise in the sitting room. It may be a noise that you are not aware of
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