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    • Andrea1589
    • By Andrea1589 13th Sep 17, 11:38 AM
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    Andrea1589
    Returning to work after maternity impossible
    • #1
    • 13th Sep 17, 11:38 AM
    Returning to work after maternity impossible 13th Sep 17 at 11:38 AM
    I am at my wits end. I have recently had a new baby and am desperate to return to work. I was earning 330 a week before maternity i am now earning 140 pw smp. Having spoke to tax credits i have learned by going back to work i would get 25 pw childcare help for a 165 pw bill plus my tax credits will drop by 40 pw. It basically means by going back to work 40 hours to my original job i would be 10 pound a week better off. I dont understand this. They are making it impossible for me to return to work and having worked all my life this is really taking a toll on my mental state. If anyone can offer advice or anyone in a simaler situation can advise that would be greatly appreciated.
Page 1
    • Brighty
    • By Brighty 13th Sep 17, 11:43 AM
    • 684 Posts
    • 346 Thanks
    Brighty
    • #2
    • 13th Sep 17, 11:43 AM
    • #2
    • 13th Sep 17, 11:43 AM
    Did you not plan for this before before getting pregnant?
    Once your SMP stops and you're not entitled to any other out of work benefit, the difference between working or not will increase from £10 to £150
    • Andrea1589
    • By Andrea1589 13th Sep 17, 12:01 PM
    • 2 Posts
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    Andrea1589
    • #3
    • 13th Sep 17, 12:01 PM
    • #3
    • 13th Sep 17, 12:01 PM
    No it was not a planned pregnancy haha but these things happen. I was hoping to return to work sooner than waiting for my leave to end
    • t0rt0ise
    • By t0rt0ise 13th Sep 17, 12:15 PM
    • 2,906 Posts
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    t0rt0ise
    • #4
    • 13th Sep 17, 12:15 PM
    • #4
    • 13th Sep 17, 12:15 PM
    When I was a lone parent I had the attitude that working, even if earning no more than I would have got if staying at home, was an investment in the future. I worked for some years as a Classroom Assistant. I enjoyed the work and when I was ready for full-time work it helped me gain it. It also gave my children the idea that working was the norm and neither of them have ever been out of work. So £10 a week may be worth it in the long run.
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 13th Sep 17, 12:27 PM
    • 3,874 Posts
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    TELLIT01
    • #5
    • 13th Sep 17, 12:27 PM
    • #5
    • 13th Sep 17, 12:27 PM
    I'm sorry but I don't see how anybody is making it impossible for you to return to work. You will be in the same financial position as you were before the baby. Are you saying that the state should pay you extra because you have had a child?
    • Darksparkle
    • By Darksparkle 13th Sep 17, 12:33 PM
    • 4,533 Posts
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    Darksparkle
    • #6
    • 13th Sep 17, 12:33 PM
    • #6
    • 13th Sep 17, 12:33 PM
    In an ideal world we'd all plan to have children and have plenty of time to plan financially. Unfortunately it's not always the case.

    Is £330 per week before or after tax? Do you have a partner? If so what hours do they work and what do they earn?

    I'd single, have you considered returning to work part time? So single parents find this works out better financially.

    However I don't see what's impossible about it.
    Last edited by Darksparkle; 13-09-2017 at 12:35 PM.
    • xylophone
    • By xylophone 13th Sep 17, 12:38 PM
    • 22,881 Posts
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    xylophone
    • #7
    • 13th Sep 17, 12:38 PM
    • #7
    • 13th Sep 17, 12:38 PM
    Even if you were only £10 a week better off that is still "better off"?

    How is this making it impossible to return to work?
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 13th Sep 17, 12:40 PM
    • 59,916 Posts
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    PasturesNew
    • #8
    • 13th Sep 17, 12:40 PM
    • #8
    • 13th Sep 17, 12:40 PM
    They're giving you free money to chase your dream life ... and you're disgruntled? Benefits are fairly new in the UK, mostly since about WW2.

    If you want to go back to work, do so. They give you a handy little extra if that's what you choose to do.

    If you don't want to go back, then don't.
    • Kayalana99
    • By Kayalana99 13th Sep 17, 12:44 PM
    • 3,318 Posts
    • 5,950 Thanks
    Kayalana99
    • #9
    • 13th Sep 17, 12:44 PM
    • #9
    • 13th Sep 17, 12:44 PM
    I am at my wits end. I have recently had a new baby and am desperate to return to work. I was earning 330 a week before maternity i am now earning 140 pw smp. Having spoke to tax credits i have learned by going back to work i would get 25 pw childcare help for a 165 pw bill plus my tax credits will drop by 40 pw. It basically means by going back to work 40 hours to my original job i would be 10 pound a week better off. I dont understand this. They are making it impossible for me to return to work and having worked all my life this is really taking a toll on my mental state. If anyone can offer advice or anyone in a simaler situation can advise that would be greatly appreciated.
    Originally posted by Andrea1589
    Unf this is part and parcel of having kids, it's not really up to the government to provide for your children. They support you for the bare minimum, but luxuries will be a thing of the past unless you can earn enough to cover your bills/childcare etc.

    Personally, I found it best to work from home. It kept me sane, Husband had a full-time wage coming in to be fair, but it wasn't worth returning to work as even a few hundred from my business was more then what I would get working full-time with two young ones in child care...youngest gets the 30 free hours now and I work evenings. If you are going to be £10 better off (and literally, take into account transport and work clothes costs etc) I'd still go back and look for something else that pays more in long run.
    People don't know what they want until you show them.
    • Kayalana99
    • By Kayalana99 13th Sep 17, 12:48 PM
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    Kayalana99
    Even if you were only £10 a week better off that is still "better off"?

    How is this making it impossible to return to work?
    Originally posted by xylophone
    I think her point is they are making it not worth it. Since they give you £x amount to sit on her bum, really you'd think they would make it in favour for people to go to work. I appreciate this sort-of counters what I just said in a way, but the government aren't really helping Mother's back into work since they just pay them to stay at home the same as they would at work pratically.
    People don't know what they want until you show them.
    • Kayalana99
    • By Kayalana99 13th Sep 17, 12:49 PM
    • 3,318 Posts
    • 5,950 Thanks
    Kayalana99
    I'm sorry but I don't see how anybody is making it impossible for you to return to work. You will be in the same financial position as you were before the baby. Are you saying that the state should pay you extra because you have had a child?
    Originally posted by TELLIT01
    Your confused here, she would be in a substantial worse position then before she had the baby, but not much better off then what she is now if she returned to work rather then stayed at home.
    People don't know what they want until you show them.
    • bexy_v
    • By bexy_v 13th Sep 17, 2:09 PM
    • 338 Posts
    • 551 Thanks
    bexy_v
    after paying childcare of which we got no help I was barely better off for working but for me is about a good balance, it is hard but you will also be mentally better off as your obviously a grafter and have worked before which is great. Dont forget the child benefit and make sure your getting all the support you can. I worked 40 hrs a week before now i work 28 and little one is now at school but i went back to wrok after baby was 8 months...it is hard ..we had to wait 6 plus years between kids due to childcare costs and have no family support due to financial planning. Do what you feel is right for you and get the information double checked. Personally i loved working as i had a hot cuppa tea lol
    Last edited by bexy_v; 13-09-2017 at 2:11 PM.
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    • nannytone
    • By nannytone 13th Sep 17, 3:17 PM
    • 12,147 Posts
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    nannytone
    what about the money that the childs father is contributing?
    • cifpower
    • By cifpower 13th Sep 17, 3:56 PM
    • 6,444 Posts
    • 4,090 Thanks
    cifpower
    I am at my wits end. I have recently had a new baby and am desperate to return to work. I was earning 330 a week before maternity i am now earning 140 pw smp. Having spoke to tax credits i have learned by going back to work i would get 25 pw childcare help for a 165 pw bill plus my tax credits will drop by 40 pw. It basically means by going back to work 40 hours to my original job i would be 10 pound a week better off. I dont understand this. They are making it impossible for me to return to work and having worked all my life this is really taking a toll on my mental state. If anyone can offer advice or anyone in a simaler situation can advise that would be greatly appreciated.
    Originally posted by Andrea1589
    Plus child benefit?


    • parkrunner
    • By parkrunner 13th Sep 17, 4:18 PM
    • 637 Posts
    • 955 Thanks
    parkrunner
    They are making it impossible for me to return to work and having worked all my life this is really taking a toll on my mental state.
    Originally posted by Andrea1589
    No they aren't.
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 13th Sep 17, 4:21 PM
    • 15,808 Posts
    • 39,509 Thanks
    FBaby
    Deciding whether to be a FT working mum or one on benefit comes down to whether you want to focus on the benefits for the next 5 years or the next 20.

    Indeed, you won't be much better off financially, yet much more stress and tired, however, if you are going to use this argument that it's not worth working if you are not better off, you are likely to remain on benefits for at least 5 years, or maybe even more because during all that time you'll compare what you would get by starting a new job at the level you are with what you are able to get in benefits.

    The alternative is that you look at it long term, go back to work accepting that doing so is in an investment for the future in that in 5/10 years time, you'll have been promoted/applied for better paid jobs, and that when your child goes to school and then even more to secondary school, you will definitely be much better off financially (and maybe psychologically too).

    It's a difficult and personal decision but I think too many single mum make it only looking at it from the perspective of the next few months rather than years.
    • parkrunner
    • By parkrunner 13th Sep 17, 4:23 PM
    • 637 Posts
    • 955 Thanks
    parkrunner
    Your confused here, she would be in a substantial worse position then before she had the baby, but not much better off then what she is now if she returned to work rather then stayed at home.
    Originally posted by Kayalana99
    Precisely. About time people started taking responsibility for their own actions and realised that having kids is expensive.
    • Loz01
    • By Loz01 13th Sep 17, 6:28 PM
    • 1,426 Posts
    • 3,107 Thanks
    Loz01
    Cant the baby's Dad help with childcare and/or costs? If you're not together, do you get child maintenance?
    An apple a day keeps anyone away if you throw it hard enough
    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 13th Sep 17, 7:32 PM
    • 8,221 Posts
    • 4,891 Thanks
    teddysmum
    My sons were born in the late 70s, early 80s and there was no help with child care.


    Care was much cheaper, but then wages were lower too and mortgage rates in the upper teens.


    We considered whether to have children, a number of times as we knew that my being off work would mean a huge drop in income, but that is the sacrifice you have to make. My sister chose the opposite and is childless, but they wanted to keep the freedom to take 2 or 3 holidays a year, though it was a hard decision.


    There are advantages to nursery, as I noticed with my first son,who didn't go to nursery until he was 3,having been with a child minder.Within weeks of starting his progress accelerated.


    The same was seen with two grand daughters only one day different in age. The one who went early (after maternity leave ended)to nursery did everything more quickly, but the other started well before school age and caught up.


    This accelerated learning would have been a great advantage to a child who would normally have needed extra help if they started school at the required age , with no pre-school socialisation and learning, so a great reward for the income sacrifice.
    • Loz01
    • By Loz01 13th Sep 17, 8:06 PM
    • 1,426 Posts
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    Loz01
    Even if you're only a LITTLE bit better off in work surely its better to do that be out of work? Its always harder to go back the longer you've been away. As the baby gets older, turns into a toddler etc then childcare will get cheaper as you'll get the free nursery hours. Then obviously at 4 they will go to school.
    An apple a day keeps anyone away if you throw it hard enough
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