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  • FIRST POST
    • Spies
    • By Spies 11th Sep 17, 7:48 PM
    • 78Posts
    • 32Thanks
    Spies
    Wet internal wall
    • #1
    • 11th Sep 17, 7:48 PM
    Wet internal wall 11th Sep 17 at 7:48 PM
    I have a west facing gable end wall in my property which catches a lot of wind/rain.

    After the storms in December 2014 it was so bad that that plaster lost adhesion with the brick and crumbled away.

    The property had its original wood framed window so this was replaced with a upvc one and it doesn't appear to have been damp since.

    The house was built in 1996 and when I questioned the house builder what they had been used in the walls, they said full fibrefill.

    Fast forward to last night and driving wind/rain has once again made the interior wall wet.

    What are my options? I don't have the ability to throw thousands at the issue but would like a semi-permanent solution, access to the exterior wall is very difficult due to cars driving under the room to get to the carpark behind. The exterior wall is dashed and painted, but I have been told by other builders that even if it was unpainted, moisture shouldn't be able to get across the cavity.

    It's really disheartening to see the problem is still there.
Page 1
    • 00ec25
    • By 00ec25 11th Sep 17, 8:51 PM
    • 4,760 Posts
    • 4,134 Thanks
    00ec25
    • #2
    • 11th Sep 17, 8:51 PM
    • #2
    • 11th Sep 17, 8:51 PM
    sounds like (check with a builder) an example of poor cavity wall insulation ("full fibrefill"?) which is acting as a bridge across the cavity allowing water to move from outside to inside wall or for cold spots to develop causing condensation problems

    it is a risk that is often mentioned (and glossed over) in respect of cavity wall insulation. See here especially reference to wind blown rain on exposed walls...

    http://www.which.co.uk/reviews/insulation/article/cavity-wall-insulation/cavity-wall-insulation-damp-problems

    No "easy" solution, have a read : http://www.diydoctor.org.uk/projects/dampcavity.htm
    Last edited by 00ec25; 11-09-2017 at 8:54 PM.
    • xylophone
    • By xylophone 11th Sep 17, 8:57 PM
    • 22,866 Posts
    • 13,221 Thanks
    xylophone
    • #3
    • 11th Sep 17, 8:57 PM
    • #3
    • 11th Sep 17, 8:57 PM
    http://www.neverpaintagain.co.uk/blog/paint-gable-end-house-wall/

    Above is an ad but does any of it ring bells?
    • Spies
    • By Spies 11th Sep 17, 9:40 PM
    • 78 Posts
    • 32 Thanks
    Spies
    • #4
    • 11th Sep 17, 9:40 PM
    • #4
    • 11th Sep 17, 9:40 PM
    sounds like (check with a builder) an example of poor cavity wall insulation ("full fibrefill"?) which is acting as a bridge across the cavity allowing water to move from outside to inside wall or for cold spots to develop causing condensation problems

    it is a risk that is often mentioned (and glossed over) in respect of cavity wall insulation. See here especially reference to wind blown rain on exposed walls...

    http://www.which.co.uk/reviews/insulation/article/cavity-wall-insulation/cavity-wall-insulation-damp-problems

    No "easy" solution, have a read : http://www.diydoctor.org.uk/projects/dampcavity.htm
    Originally posted by 00ec25
    Is there not an argument that the wall would have never had full fiberfill in the first place and the issues have been caused by the original housebuilder making an error? Should they not be held liable? You can claim against insulation companies now, but the housebuilder couldn't/wouldn't tell me who they contracted that work out to as apparently they don't have records.
    • 00ec25
    • By 00ec25 12th Sep 17, 7:21 AM
    • 4,760 Posts
    • 4,134 Thanks
    00ec25
    • #5
    • 12th Sep 17, 7:21 AM
    • #5
    • 12th Sep 17, 7:21 AM
    Is there not an argument that the wall would have never had full fiberfill in the first place and the issues have been caused by the original housebuilder making an error? Should they not be held liable? You can claim against insulation companies now, but the housebuilder couldn't/wouldn't tell me who they contracted that work out to as apparently they don't have records.
    Originally posted by Spies
    at the end of the day someone or something is to "blame"

    how you find out who or what is down to how much money you are willing to throw at the investigation. You sure as heck will not get the original builder to admit liability 21 years after they built it without proof of cause.

    you will need to get an independent technical investigation report to identify that cause and then sue whoever the report says is the cause. You may end up suing one or both of: God for driving rain against the wall and the builder for not doing the insulation correctly.

    alternatively you could simply investigate "solutions" to the problem of exposed gable walls. As already indicated in the post above there are companies falling over themselves to sell things to you. Which, if any, work I have no idea, but that may be a cheaper/better option than a court case.
    Last edited by 00ec25; 12-09-2017 at 7:23 AM.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 12th Sep 17, 7:58 AM
    • 23,104 Posts
    • 88,426 Thanks
    Davesnave
    • #6
    • 12th Sep 17, 7:58 AM
    • #6
    • 12th Sep 17, 7:58 AM
    It will probably be quickest, cheapest and least stressful to pay one of the CWI removal companies to get the stuff out.

    Tonnes of CWI was pumped into houses in past years without considering its suitability with regard to site conditions. Many local councils were caught-out by the problems that ensued. If they were duped, why not the builder of your house as well?

    Afterthought: If the builder won't tell you anything, you could try contacting CIGA directly and see if there is a 25year guarantee in place for your address.
    Last edited by Davesnave; 12-09-2017 at 8:14 AM.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • Spies
    • By Spies 12th Sep 17, 1:31 PM
    • 78 Posts
    • 32 Thanks
    Spies
    • #7
    • 12th Sep 17, 1:31 PM
    • #7
    • 12th Sep 17, 1:31 PM
    It will probably be quickest, cheapest and least stressful to pay one of the CWI removal companies to get the stuff out.

    Tonnes of CWI was pumped into houses in past years without considering its suitability with regard to site conditions. Many local councils were caught-out by the problems that ensued. If they were duped, why not the builder of your house as well?

    Afterthought: If the builder won't tell you anything, you could try contacting CIGA directly and see if there is a 25year guarantee in place for your address.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    CIGA had no record of my property having had CWI.
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