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  • FIRST POST
    • ECPEngland
    • By ECPEngland 11th Sep 17, 4:01 PM
    • 4Posts
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    ECPEngland
    End Prescription Charges
    • #1
    • 11th Sep 17, 4:01 PM
    End Prescription Charges 11th Sep 17 at 4:01 PM
    The prescription charges system is unfair, confusing and makes medications unafordable for many. I'm campaigning to abolish prescription charges in England.
Page 1
    • Energize
    • By Energize 12th Sep 17, 9:15 AM
    • 332 Posts
    • 110 Thanks
    Energize
    • #2
    • 12th Sep 17, 9:15 AM
    • #2
    • 12th Sep 17, 9:15 AM
    I agree it's unfair, most medications are more expensive under the NHS prescription system than they are on a private prescription. But when a yearly prescription prepayment certificate costs £104 it's not really unaffordable.
    • ECPEngland
    • By ECPEngland 12th Sep 17, 6:02 PM
    • 4 Posts
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    ECPEngland
    • #3
    • 12th Sep 17, 6:02 PM
    • #3
    • 12th Sep 17, 6:02 PM
    Research by the Prescription Charges Coalition has found that 1 in 3 people with a long-term condition who pay for prescription charges have not picked up their prescription because they couldn't afford their prescription. If people are stuggling to pay £8.60 for one prescription, they probably can't afford a £104 prescription card either.
    Campaigning to end prescription charges.
    • ECPEngland
    • By ECPEngland 12th Sep 17, 6:06 PM
    • 4 Posts
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    ECPEngland
    • #4
    • 12th Sep 17, 6:06 PM
    • #4
    • 12th Sep 17, 6:06 PM
    Another issue with the prepayement cards is that people forget to renew them. It leaves people stuck paying full price until they can get another card. Also, sometimes people forget they've expired and end up with fines.
    Campaigning to end prescription charges.
    • BorisThomson
    • By BorisThomson 12th Sep 17, 6:49 PM
    • 538 Posts
    • 882 Thanks
    BorisThomson
    • #5
    • 12th Sep 17, 6:49 PM
    • #5
    • 12th Sep 17, 6:49 PM
    Who do you suggest pays for the prescriptions instead? What was the sample size of the research that reached the one in three figure, and how were the participants identified?

    You can pay for the PPC monthly, you don't have to pay it all at once. You may also be entitled to assistance through the low income scheme.

    I'd focus on ensuring the people you refer to are receiving any assistance they are entitled to, not placing even more of a burden on the NHS.
    • unforeseen
    • By unforeseen 12th Sep 17, 7:41 PM
    • 1,866 Posts
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    unforeseen
    • #6
    • 12th Sep 17, 7:41 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Sep 17, 7:41 PM
    Another issue with the prepayement cards is that people forget to renew them. It leaves people stuck paying full price until they can get another card. Also, sometimes people forget they've expired and end up with fines.
    Originally posted by ECPEngland
    Or they can use their common sense and pay by DD. The prepayment card will then auto renew with no gap
    • ECPEngland
    • By ECPEngland 12th Sep 17, 7:41 PM
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    ECPEngland
    • #7
    • 12th Sep 17, 7:41 PM
    • #7
    • 12th Sep 17, 7:41 PM
    It was a sample of 4,264 living in England who said they took medication for a long-term condition. I'm not allowed to post URLs (I will post it when I can) but you can find the full report on the Prescription Charges Coalition's website. (I'm not affiliated to the Prescription Charges Coalition)

    Also, the Royal Pharmaceutical Society found that the money spent by the NHS on treating people didn't take their medication because they couldn't afford it is about the same as the total revenue generated by prescription charges. Once again, I can't post the URL, but you can find their report by searching "Prescription charges backfire on UK health and wealth"
    Campaigning to end prescription charges.
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 12th Sep 17, 11:28 PM
    • 7,728 Posts
    • 5,514 Thanks
    esuhl
    • #8
    • 12th Sep 17, 11:28 PM
    • #8
    • 12th Sep 17, 11:28 PM
    I'd be inclined to agree in abolishing the prescription charge, but... the NHS has much bigger problems than that at the moment.

    It's been beyond breaking point for years, and underfunding is getting worse. The current government intend to let it fail so they can replace it with an insurance-based (profit-based) system.

    I can't see the NHS lasting much longer.
    • Kim_13
    • By Kim_13 13th Sep 17, 12:28 AM
    • 1,356 Posts
    • 1,716 Thanks
    Kim_13
    • #9
    • 13th Sep 17, 12:28 AM
    • #9
    • 13th Sep 17, 12:28 AM
    The prescription charge may or may not be unaffordable, it depends on circumstances which aren't as simple as the current low income scheme assumes. Even that has two cut offs - £7,250 (I think) in savings higher if someone is in a care home, but no partial support with prescriptions for those in between the two like there is with care home funding. Then it assumes that those ineligible because of a partner's income can just get the partner to pay it - not all partners are going to stump up in these cases.

    £8.60 in my opinion is too much - it's asking the lowest paid to work for more than an hour for one medicine. In times when pay in real terms is decreasing, it's more likely to be unaffordable now than it has been in the past and the one third figure doesn't surprise me.

    A small charge is probably the best thing. That way it helps to reduce waste, as people are then careful to only order what they will actually need.

    The primary concern for me at the moment is fairness. A postcode lottery is not fair, which is effectively what we have. It is also not fair that the charge is marketed as "an amount which successive governments have thought it fair to charge people who can afford to pay for their medication." That's clearly not accurate when a certain condition can exempt someone who can afford to pay, even from charges not related to that condition. Then there's the asthmatics, transplant recipients etc who still have to pay.

    The whole PPC setup also seems to be more complicated than it needs to be. I recently had to pay for a prescription and when asked if I wanted the receipt, said yes and kept it safe etc. Why bother offering a receipt if it turns out that that isn't sufficient to get a refund if you later buy a PPC? The failure to offer 12 monthly DD's for the annual PPC also hurts those who can least afford to pay. It seems designed in the hope that certificates accidentally lapse so people can be fined. The DD option only exists on a 12 month certificate.

    How much is it costing in admin because a blanket approach isn't applied to everyone?
    Last edited by Kim_13; 13-09-2017 at 12:50 AM.
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    • Enterprise 1701C
    • By Enterprise 1701C 13th Sep 17, 7:12 AM
    • 18,185 Posts
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    Enterprise 1701C
    If we actually managed to avoid treating people that were not entitled to free nhs treatment then it would make a big difference.

    Far too many people come to this country specifically for the free treatment. They literally get off the plane and check into the nearest hospital.

    It is the National Health Service, not the International Health Service.
    What is this life if, full of care, we have no time to stand and stare
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 13th Sep 17, 8:44 PM
    • 714 Posts
    • 256 Thanks
    sevenhills
    Who do you suggest pays for the prescriptions instead?
    Originally posted by BorisThomson
    A small charge is probably the best thing. That way it helps to reduce waste, as people are then careful to only order what they will actually need.
    Originally posted by Kim_13
    A small charge for everyone would bring in more revenue.

    Nearly 90% of the 843 million prescription items dispensed each year are free. I am one of the 10% of the population that pays £8.60 per item, and I believe it is unfair.

    https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/213884/dh_116367.pdf

    • decbel
    • By decbel 14th Sep 17, 2:49 AM
    • 1,494 Posts
    • 1,616 Thanks
    decbel
    Here in Wales we have 'free' scrips.

    Before any clever !!!! types it I know scrips are paid for somewhere down the line.

    But free scrips are a red herring,

    The majority who receive these scrips would have done so under various exemptions anyway.

    Up to debate if some wish these exemptions to be curtailed.
    • bertiewhite
    • By bertiewhite 14th Sep 17, 8:58 AM
    • 711 Posts
    • 749 Thanks
    bertiewhite
    Here in Wales we have 'free' scrips.
    Originally posted by decbel
    But on the other hand we have to travel to England for many treatments that simply aren't available due to location. I'm thinking particularly about mental health issues.
    • robin58
    • By robin58 14th Sep 17, 11:17 PM
    • 1,981 Posts
    • 2,034 Thanks
    robin58
    Another issue with the prepayement cards is that people forget to renew them. It leaves people stuck paying full price until they can get another card. Also, sometimes people forget they've expired and end up with fines.
    Originally posted by ECPEngland
    Well if you buy outright, yes.

    But if you sign up for a DD option you can pay £10.40 a month for 10 months. And it will auto renew every year until you tell then to stop it. They even give you a months warning you are coming up for renewal and allow you to either cancel or renew.

    I know because I'm on this option.

    So basically for the price of a 1 item prescription per month you can be signed up and be covered for future proscriptions. So within 12 proscriptions, they are basically 'free'

    As for people with long term illnesses not bothering to go to chemist and not getting thier tablets, they need to look into the future and re-access thier priorities.
    Last edited by robin58; 14-09-2017 at 11:21 PM.
    The more I live, the more I learn.
    The more I learn, the more I grow.
    The more I grow, the more I see.
    The more I see, the more I know.
    The more I know, the more I see,
    How little I know.!!
    • unforeseen
    • By unforeseen 15th Sep 17, 6:52 AM
    • 1,866 Posts
    • 2,355 Thanks
    unforeseen

    Nearly 90% of the 843 million prescription items dispensed each year are free. I am one of the 10% of the population that pays £8.60 per item, and I believe it is unfair.
    Originally posted by sevenhills
    I made a choice based on cost.

    Do I pay £10.40 per month for 10 months or do I pay £51.60 every 28 days?. No brainer really.

    Les face it, you only need one prescription every 28 days to make it worthwhile getting a prepay. If you don't even need hat many then if you save 20p per day hen you will have a little pot of money to pay for the prescription when you do need one.
    • interstellaflyer
    • By interstellaflyer 16th Sep 17, 12:28 PM
    • 1,644 Posts
    • 968 Thanks
    interstellaflyer
    Or they can use their common sense and pay by DD. The prepayment card will then auto renew with no gap
    Originally posted by unforeseen
    You'd think it would be that simple but it ain't, my partner is on ESA and requires around £40 worth of prescriptions a month, as she is on contribution based ESA not Income based ESA she has to pay for prescriptions, and gets no help with dental treatment and eye tests or glasses, she had a pre payment card however, she missed a direct debit, now most organisations simply re apply for the money, not the case for the pre payment people, rather than re apply for the money a few days later, they just cancelled the card and sent a bill for £65 which covered the remaining payments and they won't issue a new card until the £65 is payed.
    I hate football and do wish people wouldn't keep talking about it like it's the most important thing in the world
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 18th Sep 17, 5:18 PM
    • 6,321 Posts
    • 5,080 Thanks
    Norman Castle
    A small charge for everyone would bring in more revenue.

    Nearly 90% of the 843 million prescription items dispensed each year are free. I am one of the 10% of the population that pays £8.60 per item, and I believe it is unfair.

    https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/213884/dh_116367.pdf
    Originally posted by sevenhills
    Not sure that 90% of prescriptions equates to 90% of the population. Its likely to be a smaller percentage having a higher proportion of prescriptions.

    A smaller charge for everyone with a monthly cap might be fairer with an exemption for seriously poor.

    How many doctors appointments are made to avoid paying for medicine?
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.
    • decbel
    • By decbel 18th Sep 17, 6:24 PM
    • 1,494 Posts
    • 1,616 Thanks
    decbel
    Not sure that 90% of prescriptions equates to 90% of the population. Its likely to be a smaller percentage having a higher proportion of prescriptions.

    A smaller charge for everyone with a monthly cap might be fairer with an exemption for seriously poor.

    How many doctors appointments are made to avoid paying for medicine?
    Originally posted by Norman Castle
    Its certainly not 90% of the population.

    Many of us haven't seen the doctor for years.
    • robin58
    • By robin58 18th Sep 17, 9:26 PM
    • 1,981 Posts
    • 2,034 Thanks
    robin58
    Its certainly not 90% of the population.

    Many of us haven't seen the doctor for years.
    Originally posted by decbel
    Don't be smug.

    They will always get to see you at sometime in the future especially as you get older.
    The more I live, the more I learn.
    The more I learn, the more I grow.
    The more I grow, the more I see.
    The more I see, the more I know.
    The more I know, the more I see,
    How little I know.!!
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