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  • FIRST POST
    • PollySouthend
    • By PollySouthend 11th Sep 17, 2:17 PM
    • 377Posts
    • 841Thanks
    PollySouthend
    Policeman rear ended me at a junction and wrote off my car
    • #1
    • 11th Sep 17, 2:17 PM
    Policeman rear ended me at a junction and wrote off my car 11th Sep 17 at 2:17 PM
    He was pretty unpleasant after it happened and didn't apologize or anything.

    I had to wait a few hours for an independent police person to arrive. He said he would breathalyse us both.

    I had already had several hours driving so after the waiting around on the roadside I was happy to just get away.

    The new policeman didn't breathalyse either of us and I've received a letter that they take full responsibility. They have covered the cost of the car.

    I haven't claimed for anything else even though I had bad whiplash for a week and it's still persisting 3 weeks later.

    I think the one that wrote off my car might have been over the limit. Is there anything I can do now? Did they follow prodecure by not breathalusing us?
Page 3
    • Stoke
    • By Stoke 12th Sep 17, 12:04 PM
    • 1,794 Posts
    • 644 Thanks
    Stoke
    No it took them 25 years to charge 4 people - that does not a system make
    Originally posted by Guest101
    I think I know where you're going with that, but actually, the evidence showed a system of corruption in-which senior management abused their authority. It wasn't just 4 people..... there were dozens involved. Some of whom have since died and can't be charged, many of whom won't be charged because only the most high profile are being dealt with and others who have perhaps gone unnoticed.

    We are a long way off a corruption free force, but don't worry, it won't happen to you.
    • Guest101
    • By Guest101 12th Sep 17, 1:03 PM
    • 15,159 Posts
    • 14,727 Thanks
    Guest101
    I think I know where you're going with that, but actually, the evidence showed a system of corruption in-which senior management abused their authority. - Simply by saying a 'system of corruption' doesn't mean anything. Some individuals who held high office abused their position. It does not mean that the whole system was like that It wasn't just 4 people..... there were dozens involved. - as far as i'm aware 4 are being charged at this moment Some of whom have since died and can't be charged, many of whom won't be charged because only the most high profile are being dealt with and others who have perhaps gone unnoticed. - that maybe the case, but even dozens in a organisation employing thousands is small fry.

    We are a long way off a corruption free force, but don't worry, it won't happen to you.
    Originally posted by Stoke


    I didn't claim otherwise, i'm simply saying the whole service is not corrupt
    • PollySouthend
    • By PollySouthend 12th Sep 17, 1:22 PM
    • 377 Posts
    • 841 Thanks
    PollySouthend
    It was an unmarked police car on duty.

    Yes my insurance has been informed.

    Not looking for personal injury, was just thinking about reporting for possible corruption as they didn't check that the driver in the wrong was over the limit.

    I'm quite surprised by some of the comments here, I thought the police here were generally held in a higher regard than that. "That's paid for the new kitchen" is disgusting.
    • LeeUK
    • By LeeUK 12th Sep 17, 2:05 PM
    • 5,523 Posts
    • 2,550 Thanks
    LeeUK
    Still plenty of bent coppers out there. My mate's father was working for a force as a civilian until retirement and what went on would open anyones eyes.
    • Car 54
    • By Car 54 12th Sep 17, 2:16 PM
    • 2,220 Posts
    • 1,416 Thanks
    Car 54

    Not looking for personal injury, was just thinking about reporting for possible corruption as they didn't check that the driver in the wrong was over the limit.
    Originally posted by PollySouthend
    But you said "... I had bad whiplash for a week and it's still persisting 3 weeks later."

    At the very least, you should make sure (if you haven't done so already) that you see a doctor ASAP and then as long as symptoms persist, and get the injury documented.

    These things can persist, and if it leads to time off work etc. then you have three years. in which to make a PI claim.
    • Robisere
    • By Robisere 12th Sep 17, 4:47 PM
    • 1,728 Posts
    • 2,519 Thanks
    Robisere
    When I first met a BIL who was a police officer, I already had mixed feelings about the police, who had arresred me at 23 for GBH offence that I had not committed, due to:
    *Being in a town 5 miles away until 9pm, with 7 witnesses.
    *Being in a club with 5 of those witnesses, until the point the police entered, manhandled me and arrested me without reading my rights and refusing to listen to the witnesses. (I did not resist)
    *Refusing to listen to my father after he was informed and came to the station, would not let him see me.
    Next day 2 detectives came to see me. Apparently the "victim" had fallen on his face into his own wall and made up a story. My dad forced them to apologise, then wrote to the Chief Constable for a written apoplogy. I was in the Army at the time, having spent the Saturday celebrating a posting abroad on the Monday with my mates.

    After that, as I say I was wary of the police. After a night out with my BIL and 4 of his mates a few years later, I learned what they are like when they "relax". They were rude and humiliating to restaurant and bar staff, they acted like the worst yobs that they would probably arrest for the same behaviour. Going home, at 2am, two of them removed another's trousers, climbed a lamp post and hung his pants from them.

    Needless to say, I never again went into their company. My previous wariness changed to total disrespect. Perhaps it is true that they are not all like that. I will take some convincing...
    There may be more than one way to skin a cat.
    But the result is always inedible.

    • Guest101
    • By Guest101 12th Sep 17, 5:05 PM
    • 15,159 Posts
    • 14,727 Thanks
    Guest101
    When I first met a BIL who was a police officer, I already had mixed feelings about the police, who had arresred me at 23 for GBH offence that I had not committed, due to:
    *Being in a town 5 miles away until 9pm, with 7 witnesses.
    *Being in a club with 5 of those witnesses, until the point the police entered, manhandled me and arrested me without reading my rights and refusing to listen to the witnesses. (I did not resist)
    *Refusing to listen to my father after he was informed and came to the station, would not let him see me.
    Next day 2 detectives came to see me. Apparently the "victim" had fallen on his face into his own wall and made up a story. My dad forced them to apologise, then wrote to the Chief Constable for a written apoplogy. I was in the Army at the time, having spent the Saturday celebrating a posting abroad on the Monday with my mates.

    After that, as I say I was wary of the police. After a night out with my BIL and 4 of his mates a few years later, I learned what they are like when they "relax". They were rude and humiliating to restaurant and bar staff, they acted like the worst yobs that they would probably arrest for the same behaviour. Going home, at 2am, two of them removed another's trousers, climbed a lamp post and hung his pants from them.

    Needless to say, I never again went into their company. My previous wariness changed to total disrespect. Perhaps it is true that they are not all like that. I will take some convincing...
    Originally posted by Robisere


    Just to be clear that bit in red, they aren't legally obliged to do.
    • Warwick Hunt
    • By Warwick Hunt 12th Sep 17, 6:27 PM
    • 211 Posts
    • 108 Thanks
    Warwick Hunt
    When I first met a BIL who was a police officer, I already had mixed feelings about the police, who had arresred me at 23 for GBH offence that I had not committed, due to:
    *Being in a town 5 miles away until 9pm, with 7 witnesses.Did they pick you at random or was there some logic in their arrest?
    *Being in a club with 5 of those witnesses, until the point the police entered, manhandled me and arrested me without reading my rightsThey don't have to if you're drunk. and refusing to listen to the witnesses. (I did not resist)
    *Refusing to listen to my father after he was informed and came to the station, would not let him see me.Why should he have been allowed to see you? You were and adult and under arrest.
    Next day 2 detectives came to see me. Apparently the "victim" had fallen on his face into his own wall and made up a story. My dad forced them to apologise, then wrote to the Chief Constable for a written apoplogy. I was in the Army at the time, having spent the Saturday celebrating a posting abroad on the Monday with my mates.

    After that, as I say I was wary of the police. After a night out with my BIL and 4 of his mates a few years later, I learned what they are like when they "relax". They were rude and humiliating to restaurant and bar staff, they acted like the worst yobs that they would probably arrest for the same behaviour. Going home, at 2am, two of them removed another's trousers, climbed a lamp post and hung his pants from them.

    Needless to say, I never again went into their company. My previous wariness changed to total disrespect. Perhaps it is true that they are not all like that. I will take some convincing...
    Originally posted by Robisere

    I don't really see any wrong doing by the police, there was an allegation of assault with they investigated.
    • Warwick Hunt
    • By Warwick Hunt 12th Sep 17, 6:29 PM
    • 211 Posts
    • 108 Thanks
    Warwick Hunt
    Just to be clear that bit in red, they aren't legally obliged to do.
    Originally posted by Guest101
    And bearing in mind this was pre PACE, they probably weren't then either.
    • Warwick Hunt
    • By Warwick Hunt 12th Sep 17, 6:30 PM
    • 211 Posts
    • 108 Thanks
    Warwick Hunt
    It was an unmarked police car on duty.

    Yes my insurance has been informed.

    Not looking for personal injury, was just thinking about reporting for possible corruption as they didn't check that the driver in the wrong was over the limit.

    I'm quite surprised by some of the comments here, I thought the police here were generally held in a higher regard than that. "That's paid for the new kitchen" is disgusting.
    Originally posted by PollySouthend
    Are you saying there were two counts of corruption?

    Or did they only breath test you?
    • cjdavies
    • By cjdavies 12th Sep 17, 8:09 PM
    • 2,562 Posts
    • 2,509 Thanks
    cjdavies
    Not Police or personally know any, so I think they are great, it's the pathetic low sentencing guidelines I have issues with - new thread in discussion section I think.
    • trailingspouse
    • By trailingspouse 12th Sep 17, 9:50 PM
    • 2,197 Posts
    • 3,068 Thanks
    trailingspouse
    Why aren't you claiming for the whiplash?

    I know there is a lot in the press about 'so-called whiplash' - but the important phrase there is 'so-called'. You've got actual whiplash, which is nasty - I was hit from behind in what was otherwise a fairly minor crash, and had pain in my neck for a good 3 or 4 years. And yes, I claimed against the other driver.
    • Robisere
    • By Robisere 12th Sep 17, 10:19 PM
    • 1,728 Posts
    • 2,519 Thanks
    Robisere
    I don't really see any wrong doing by the police, there was an allegation of assault with they investigated.
    Originally posted by Warwick Hunt
    Those of you commenting upon this have completely taken the Police side of the matter. I'll take your comments and explain why they are misplaced (kind word for it!)
    *They picked me at random, I thought, until years later when I was informed by a young copper who left the force after another, similar event, that it was because (a) I was a soldier and (b) because the "victim" of the "attack" had an issue with my brother. As my brother was miles away, the "victim" named me, simply to get at my brother. The "victim" was probably drunk, by the way: he was an alcoholic.
    *I was not drunk: I had spent the day at first with a gf, then my mates at a local cinema. In the club later, I had just 2 pints. I was an Army football player and distance runner, which I loved and did not want to compromise my fitness. I even trained whilst on leave.
    *My dad just wanted to tell the police what my mates had told him: that I was not in the vicinity of the "victim" at the time of the fictitious "attack"
    *The police would not listen to either dad or the witnesses, took no statements or details. Had they done so, they would have realised that I was innocent. They just wanted to arrest someone.

    If these police officers were innocent of any wrongdoing, why did 2 detectives come to my house next day to apologise? And why did I receive a written apology from the Chief Constable?
    My dad told the detectives he wanted to support me in a civil case of Wrongful Arrest, but I just wanted to get on with my life.

    I note that none of you commented upon the second story. You are part of that section of the people who believe that the police can do no wrong. Well, you are wrong. I know and believe that the vast majority of coppers are fine, just doing their challenging jobs, but there is a minority who are not like that. If ever something like these events happen to you, you may find that out yourselves. Or if you happen to be black and driving in a British city...
    There may be more than one way to skin a cat.
    But the result is always inedible.

    • Warwick Hunt
    • By Warwick Hunt 12th Sep 17, 10:41 PM
    • 211 Posts
    • 108 Thanks
    Warwick Hunt
    Those of you commenting upon this have completely taken the Police side of the matter. I'll take your comments and explain why they are misplaced (kind word for it!)
    *They picked me at random, No, you were named as the offender. I thought, until years later when I was informed by a young copper who left the force after another, similar event, that it was because (a) I was a soldier and (b) because the "victim" of the "attack" had an issue with my brother. As my brother was miles away, the "victim" named me, simply to get at my brother. The "victim" was probably drunk, by the way: he was an alcoholic.
    *I was not drunk: a young soldier out on the lash and not drunk. BS.I had spent the day at first with a gf, then my mates at a local cinema. In the club later, I had just 2 pints. I was an Army football player and distance runner, which I loved and did not want to compromise my fitness. I even trained whilst on leave.
    *My dad just wanted to tell the police what my mates had told him: that I was not in the vicinity of the "victim" at the time of the fictitious "attack"So hearsay evidence. He had nothing to do with the investigation, had nothing to add evidentially and was interfering.
    *The police would not listen to either dad or the witnesses, took no statements or details. Had they done so, they would have realised that I was innocent. They just wanted to arrest someone.

    If these police officers were innocent of any wrongdoing, why did 2 detectives come to my house next day to apologise? And why did I receive a written apology from the Chief Constable? I smell bulls!t.
    My dad told the detectives he wanted to support me in a civil case of Wrongful Arrest, but I just wanted to get on with my life.

    I note that none of you commented upon the second story. You are part of that section of the people who believe that the police can do no wrong. Well, you are wrong. I know and believe that the vast majority of coppers are fine, just doing their challenging jobs, but there is a minority who are not like that. If ever something like these events happen to you, you may find that out yourselves. Or if you happen to be black and driving in a British city...
    Originally posted by Robisere
    You're a story teller and you stories must be told.
    • Mercdriver
    • By Mercdriver 12th Sep 17, 10:42 PM
    • 1,351 Posts
    • 894 Thanks
    Mercdriver
    I love how posters are making generalised comments in relation to the whole of the police force based on isolated incidents.

    Bit like saying all scousers are thieves really...

    And no I'm not related to or friends with ANY serving policeman.
    • treboeth
    • By treboeth 12th Sep 17, 11:07 PM
    • 848 Posts
    • 922 Thanks
    treboeth
    I love how posters are making generalised comments in relation to the whole of the police force based on isolated incidents.

    Bit like saying all scousers are thieves really...

    And no I'm not related to or friends with ANY serving policeman.
    Originally posted by Mercdriver
    In every Profession there are good and bad, but Human Nature seems to be to remember and highlight the bad
    Probably not helped by certain posters who support the police no matter what and never give a straight answer when asked rather they give one line and cryptic answers despite trying to present themselves as part of the Service
    Sad but true other posters on here give more in depth and reasonable responses without coming across as an ITK

    It`s also interesting how many times these posters get banned and return
    • Stoke
    • By Stoke 13th Sep 17, 9:21 AM
    • 1,794 Posts
    • 644 Thanks
    Stoke
    The problem is, as put above, but it always sours the 'victims' view of the police. I am in no doubt that a lot of the police are good honest people. They are, however, the ones who are simply doing their job. Being honest and well meaning is part of the job. Hence you have to focus on the corrupt side of the force, because they are the ones bringing it into disrepute.

    I have to admit, my view of the police is a dim one and I have to be somewhat careful of what I write because the case I speak in reference to, actually went to court etc.

    The problem is that if it was just one or two bobbies, rogue officers so to speak, it's a little easier to stomach.... but when you hear the numbers and they start to rise, you begin to worry that something very bad is going on behind the scenes.

    When I use the term 'system of corruption', I mean that in the case I speak of, I witnessed, what I believe most would consider corruption in higher and lower areas of the police. Unacceptable, and has tarnished my view of them for life.
    • Guest101
    • By Guest101 13th Sep 17, 10:30 AM
    • 15,159 Posts
    • 14,727 Thanks
    Guest101
    Those of you commenting upon this have completely taken the Police side of the matter. I'll take your comments and explain why they are misplaced (kind word for it!)
    *They picked me at random, I thought, until years later when I was informed by a young copper who left the force after another, similar event, that it was because (a) I was a soldier - no it wasn't and (b) because the "victim" of the "attack" had an issue with my brother. As my brother was miles away, the "victim" named me - so you were the alleged in the matter and you had been named! , simply to get at my brother. The "victim" was probably drunk, by the way: he was an alcoholic.
    *I was not drunk: I had spent the day at first with a gf, then my mates at a local cinema. In the club later, I had just 2 pints. I was an Army football player and distance runner, which I loved and did not want to compromise my fitness. I even trained whilst on leave. - irrelevant. They thought you were an aggressive and violent person
    *My dad just wanted to tell the police what my mates had told him: that I was not in the vicinity of the "victim" at the time of the fictitious "attack" - irrelevant. that is what the investigation is for!!
    *The police would not listen to either dad or the witnesses, took no statements or details. Had they done so, they would have realised that I was innocent. They just wanted to arrest someone. - and then they let you go.....

    If these police officers were innocent of any wrongdoing, why did 2 detectives come to my house next day to apologise?-because it's the right thing to do? And why did I receive a written apology from the Chief Constable? because it's the right thing to do?
    My dad told the detectives he wanted to support me in a civil case of Wrongful Arrest, but I just wanted to get on with my life. - but you weren't wrongfully arrested. It was not mistaken identity for example.

    I note that none of you commented upon the second story. You are part of that section of the people who believe that the police can do no wrong. - nope. I've been wrongfully arrested. As in genuinely wrongfully. But you know what I did? I cooperated with the police, there was no need for handcuffs and when in front of the custody sergeant I explained calmly why the arrest was unlawful. 20 minutes later, with 2 PCs, 2 Sgts and 1 Insp - they all came to the same conclusion - I was right. Well, you are wrong. I know and believe that the vast majority of coppers are fine, just doing their challenging jobs, but there is a minority who are not like that. If ever something like these events happen to you, you may find that out yourselves. Or if you happen to be black and driving in a British city...
    Originally posted by Robisere
    Oh the race card.......
    • Retrogamer
    • By Retrogamer 13th Sep 17, 10:57 AM
    • 3,766 Posts
    • 3,762 Thanks
    Retrogamer
    Ah so it's ok to do 100mph if you're a copper. The privileged gang
    Originally posted by Stoke
    Well to be fair, the woman was still at fault somewhat.
    She either looked in the mirror but not long enough to judge the approaching speed, but decided to pull out anyway or she looked in the mirror, seen they were approaching rapidly and decided to pull out anyway.

    Neither is safe.
    • Car 54
    • By Car 54 13th Sep 17, 12:21 PM
    • 2,220 Posts
    • 1,416 Thanks
    Car 54
    Ah so it's ok to do 100mph if you're a copper. The privileged gang
    Originally posted by Stoke
    Kaya wrote "a friend was rear ended by an unmarked police car when she changed lanes the police were doing over 100mph"

    So the only evidence of the police car's speed comes from a driver who either (a) didn't see it, or (b) saw it, but was unable to judge the speed. Not the sort of witness you want on your side.
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