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  • FIRST POST
    • il padrino
    • By il padrino 11th Sep 17, 12:38 AM
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    il padrino
    NHS dental crowns available choices
    • #1
    • 11th Sep 17, 12:38 AM
    NHS dental crowns available choices 11th Sep 17 at 12:38 AM
    I have to have a crown fitted to my upper back molar. My dentist asked me if I wanted a metal or white one. When I said white she told me that I had to go private. Is this right? I asked if she could do it as a NHS patient and I would pay the difference. However she said no. Yet my previous dentist did so. Is this correct? She also did not offer me any choices as to the type of crown she was fitting. She just took an impression of my teeth and was going to dismiss me. When I asked what type of crown she was going to get me she told me that it would be a metal with a white finish. I was not given any other options available nor was I told what was the composition of the crown she was fitting me. It is my first crown and I am worried because I am allergic to certain metals. The NHS Choices website isn't clear, can anyone help please with the type of metal alloys used on the NHS crowns and what else is on offer? Many thanks

    Il padrino
Page 1
    • brook2jack
    • By brook2jack 11th Sep 17, 9:42 AM
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    brook2jack
    • #2
    • 11th Sep 17, 9:42 AM
    • #2
    • 11th Sep 17, 9:42 AM
    NHS dentistry is there to secure health , not to give choice.

    On a back tooth you will get a metal crown. This is because ,although it doesn't look as nice as a white crown, it involves removing less tooth and is stronger and better able to stand up to the force of the bite.

    You cannot pay the "difference" between the NHS and private options , it is against rules and a dentist caught doing this will face a court case and being struck off. You either pay for a NHS option , or if you wish to have a white crown a private option.

    There are quite a few types of crown , with different compositions, available privately for back teeth. This range from 60% gold alloys to zirconium glass etc. The laboratory costs of these vary enormously , as do their characteristics and you would need to discuss with your dentist these options. Private crowns vary from £300 to over £1000 each .

    If you chose a NHS metal crown it will probably be an alloy of , most likely one of these, stainless steel, cobalt chromium , nickel chromium , palladium or 33% gold depending on how expensive the metals are at the time and which laboratory is used. Other metals in the alloy may include copper, Silver,manganese, cadmium, magnesium.
    Last edited by brook2jack; 11-09-2017 at 9:48 AM.
    • welshdent
    • By welshdent 13th Sep 17, 10:16 AM
    • 1,850 Posts
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    welshdent
    • #3
    • 13th Sep 17, 10:16 AM
    • #3
    • 13th Sep 17, 10:16 AM
    Brook is correct.

    We absolutely positively can not "top up". Dentists have been in serious trouble for doing this and have been suspended/worse by the GDC.

    If you require something for cosmetic grounds the dentist is entitled to offer it privately. There are LOTS of types of crowns. The simplest these days when it comes to tooth coloured are "porcelain bonded to metal". A metal thimble fits the tooth and porcelain is bonded to it to make it look white.
    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 13th Sep 17, 8:54 PM
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    teddysmum
    • #4
    • 13th Sep 17, 8:54 PM
    • #4
    • 13th Sep 17, 8:54 PM
    I had my lower right one removed and don't miss it at all, but there is no tooth-gap-tooth , as I have no wisdom teeth.


    Are the NHS crowns safe, if they contain steel, for someone who knows they will ,in the future, need to have MRIs some of which will be on the head ?
    Last edited by teddysmum; 13-09-2017 at 8:58 PM.
    • BorisThomson
    • By BorisThomson 13th Sep 17, 9:06 PM
    • 538 Posts
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    BorisThomson
    • #5
    • 13th Sep 17, 9:06 PM
    • #5
    • 13th Sep 17, 9:06 PM
    I had my lower right one removed and don't miss it at all, but there is no tooth-gap-tooth , as I have no wisdom teeth.


    Are the NHS crowns safe, if they contain steel, for someone who knows they will ,in the future, need to have MRIs some of which will be on the head ?
    Originally posted by teddysmum
    I have annual MRI scans on my brain and have several crowns. No problems so far!
    • Andyfordy
    • By Andyfordy 16th Sep 17, 10:36 PM
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    Andyfordy
    • #6
    • 16th Sep 17, 10:36 PM
    • #6
    • 16th Sep 17, 10:36 PM
    I had nhs crowns over 20yrs ago and up until recently have had very little problems but am currently have some treatment due to a faled root tip filling done 20 of years ago, my crowns are fantastic and look super but I'm haveing to have one removed and asked my current dentist to fit a bridge off the crown next to it which she agreed to but I'm worried weather it will look as realistic as my original crowns, if I'm not pleased with the out come what can I do its nhs treatment and it's costing £244.00
    • Toothsmith
    • By Toothsmith 17th Sep 17, 9:57 AM
    • 8,752 Posts
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    Toothsmith
    • #7
    • 17th Sep 17, 9:57 AM
    • #7
    • 17th Sep 17, 9:57 AM
    20 yrs ago, the NHS dental service was a different beast.

    I would have the conversation with your dentist about just what your expectations are. NHS treatment is there to make things functional - not make you look like Tom Cruise

    If you are unhappy with the result, then things can be drilled off and replaced - but more than the extra expense, the extra damage to the teeth in doing that is not really a place where you want to be.

    So - ideally before the new crowns/bridges are prepared, but certainly before they are cemented on, make sure your dentist knows what you are you expecting in terms of appearance, and whether that is achievable from the NHS or whether you would need to pay privately for that.
    How to find a dentist.
    1. Get recommendations from friends/family/neighbours/etc.
    2. Once you have a short-list, VISIT the practices - dont just phone. Go on the pretext of getting a Practice Leaflet.
    3. Assess the helpfulness of the staff and the level of the facilities.
    4. Only book initial appointment when you find a place you are happy with.
    • Andyfordy
    • By Andyfordy 17th Sep 17, 2:12 PM
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    Andyfordy
    • #8
    • 17th Sep 17, 2:12 PM
    • #8
    • 17th Sep 17, 2:12 PM
    Thanks you for the advise, all the prep work is done and crown ordered I might ask if I can see it one for on be for it's stuck on would that be affensive
    • brook2jack
    • By brook2jack 17th Sep 17, 6:24 PM
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    brook2jack
    • #9
    • 17th Sep 17, 6:24 PM
    • #9
    • 17th Sep 17, 6:24 PM
    By that point the dentist will have already paid for the laboratory work etc. So although it is very sensible to ask to see the bridge on before it is cemented , if you don't like the look of it you will probably have to pay the NHS cost plus a private cost to get something different as the NHS is there to secure health , not to give a cosmetically perfect result.

    This is why it would have been better to discuss this with your dentist before the bridge preparation was done. Different types of bridges need different preparations and if your dentist is aware of your expectations re looks of the bridge they can advise you accordingly.
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