Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • VooDooChilly
    • By VooDooChilly 10th Sep 17, 10:40 PM
    • 5Posts
    • 0Thanks
    VooDooChilly
    Looking for solution to fresh plaster not drying?
    • #1
    • 10th Sep 17, 10:40 PM
    Looking for solution to fresh plaster not drying? 10th Sep 17 at 10:40 PM
    Recently purchased an end terrace property built in 1912 and needed a full renovation from its 1970s appearance all round.
    My builder has done all the renovation including taking back the walls to the render and replastered throughout however one room is causing us problems with the plaster not drying in certain areas.
    Firstly there is one patch about 2ft by 2ft just higher than the floor on an internal wall where the plaster is not going "pink" and having left it for a few weeks with heater on still not fully drying. The other side of the wall in the other room dried fine with no problems.
    Also in the same affected room the exterior facing walls have about 1ft of plaster which is not drying, my builder is suggesting that this is because the exterior floor is the same level as inside and cutting a channel around the edge of the exterior wall and filling with gravel will fix this problem allowing any exterior water to go into this channel rather than running directly into the wall at inherit floor level.
    The house had not had any heating on for about 6 months at least if that is of any relevance btw.
    Any suggestions as my brain hurts from reading various things on the internet.
Page 1
    • bris
    • By bris 10th Sep 17, 10:56 PM
    • 6,837 Posts
    • 5,869 Thanks
    bris
    • #2
    • 10th Sep 17, 10:56 PM
    • #2
    • 10th Sep 17, 10:56 PM
    Did you have a damp specialist look into it before the work? Sounds like you still have a damp problem, there is specialists who will find the problem for you.


    creating a channel will not work as it could eventually just circumvent it a bit down the line if it gets clogged up and then it's back to square one.


    Have you checked the damp proof course?
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 10th Sep 17, 11:21 PM
    • 23,759 Posts
    • 66,106 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #3
    • 10th Sep 17, 11:21 PM
    • #3
    • 10th Sep 17, 11:21 PM
    No idea what the first reply is on about. Circumventing? Clogging up?

    The suggestion from the builder makes sense if the issue is the high ground level breaching DPC.

    Take the ground level lower for a foot, if that, away from the perimeter and increase drainage. Simple, common, cheap.

    Photos will help with any other suggestions.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 10th Sep 17, 11:23 PM
    • 23,759 Posts
    • 66,106 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #4
    • 10th Sep 17, 11:23 PM
    • #4
    • 10th Sep 17, 11:23 PM
    You're on a long, slippery path with 'damp specialists'.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 11th Sep 17, 1:14 AM
    • 1,249 Posts
    • 1,803 Thanks
    FreeBear
    • #5
    • 11th Sep 17, 1:14 AM
    • #5
    • 11th Sep 17, 1:14 AM
    The suggestion from the builder makes sense if the issue is the high ground level breaching DPC.
    Originally posted by Doozergirl
    Agreed - Usually referred to as a French Drain. Depending on the amount of rainfall, it may be worth installing a perforated pipe to drain the water away from the foundations.

    With the house being built in 1912, it is most likely solid brick walls - Slapping pink plaster (gypsum) on internally could well store up problems in the future. Lime plaster would have been more sympathetic towards the building and help in managing any damp. However, few will do lime plaster and it does take a long time to dry & harden fully.
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • Apodemus
    • By Apodemus 11th Sep 17, 7:17 AM
    • 846 Posts
    • 630 Thanks
    Apodemus
    • #6
    • 11th Sep 17, 7:17 AM
    • #6
    • 11th Sep 17, 7:17 AM
    Good responses from Doozegirl and Freebear! Don't let a "damp specialist" near the place unless you are sure it is someone who understands old buildings and is not trying to sell you anything. French drain is cheap and cheerful and the best starting point before going any further.
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 11th Sep 17, 8:14 AM
    • 6,167 Posts
    • 4,941 Thanks
    Norman Castle
    • #7
    • 11th Sep 17, 8:14 AM
    • #7
    • 11th Sep 17, 8:14 AM
    I've used an electric fan to dry plaster a few times. Very effective and much cheaper to run than a heater.
    I would get the plaster dry first then see if the problem reappears.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.
    • VooDooChilly
    • By VooDooChilly 11th Sep 17, 10:18 PM
    • 5 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    VooDooChilly
    • #8
    • 11th Sep 17, 10:18 PM
    • #8
    • 11th Sep 17, 10:18 PM
    Thanks for the advice, went down today to get a photo to show the issue (MSE wont allow me to post the link annoyingly h_t_t_p_s://photos.app.goo.gl/UU48DPRVDaOkmeVD3 - remove underscrores)
    Current plan is to do a french drain on the outside, get some heating on in the room as none has been on for months, then see if the plaster dries out and go from there.
    If plaster dries out and french drain works then great and get painting etc.
    If plaster doesn't dry then hack off inside bottom half to brick and inject with chemical dpm on outside brick and then after wait re render with waterproofer and salt inhibitor and replaster, paint etc.

    Anybody got any idea how long you wait for a injected chemical dpm to do its stuff?
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 12th Sep 17, 12:50 AM
    • 1,249 Posts
    • 1,803 Thanks
    FreeBear
    • #9
    • 12th Sep 17, 12:50 AM
    • #9
    • 12th Sep 17, 12:50 AM
    Is that a concrete floor that has been installed ?

    Injected DPM, tanking, and slapping on waterproof plaster is the (dubious) recommendations of these damp proof "experts" that do the free surveys. It is unlikely to cure the underlying problem, just mask it for a few years before the work has to be done again.

    If the brickwork is damp (quite likely if the property has been unheated for some time), then it is going to take a while for the walls to dry out properly - It is usually suggested that a month for every inch of brick is needed. Give the walls a mist coat of breathable paint and wait 8-12 months before doing a full paint & decorate.
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • VooDooChilly
    • By VooDooChilly 12th Sep 17, 1:26 AM
    • 5 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    VooDooChilly
    Yes a concrete floor from long ago
    • Le_Kirk
    • By Le_Kirk 12th Sep 17, 10:16 AM
    • 2,078 Posts
    • 1,057 Thanks
    Le_Kirk
    Here is your picture: -
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 12th Sep 17, 7:32 PM
    • 6,167 Posts
    • 4,941 Thanks
    Norman Castle
    Was there any sign of damp before plastering?

    Is the house well ventilated while you are not there?
    Last edited by Norman Castle; 12-09-2017 at 7:35 PM.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

3,360Posts Today

8,075Users online

Martin's Twitter