Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • JustAnotherSaver
    • By JustAnotherSaver 10th Sep 17, 9:47 PM
    • 2,564Posts
    • 410Thanks
    JustAnotherSaver
    Dehumidifier or tumble dryer
    • #1
    • 10th Sep 17, 9:47 PM
    Dehumidifier or tumble dryer 10th Sep 17 at 9:47 PM
    Dehumidifier model: Amcor SD12
    Tumble dryer model: Hotpoint TVM570

    Ok i know absolutely naff all about electrics but i was just wondering in terms of cost - what would be the difference between drying off the washing using say the dehumidifier vs the tumble dryer?

    I don't really know which one is cheaper to run, whether there's a lot in it or not much or what.

    The dehumid needs to run for a fair bit longer than the tumble dryer i know that much so even if it's cheaper to run it may not be in the long run (i'm only guessing).

    Feedback please?

Page 1
    • silkcutblue
    • By silkcutblue 11th Sep 17, 9:06 AM
    • 620 Posts
    • 365 Thanks
    silkcutblue
    • #2
    • 11th Sep 17, 9:06 AM
    • #2
    • 11th Sep 17, 9:06 AM
    Seems to be some good points in this thread: http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=3599425
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 11th Sep 17, 10:31 AM
    • 1,143 Posts
    • 1,420 Thanks
    Aylesbury Duck
    • #3
    • 11th Sep 17, 10:31 AM
    • #3
    • 11th Sep 17, 10:31 AM
    Don't worry about the difference in cost. It would be possible to work it out (approximately) based on the volume of water you are asking each machine to remove, but there is a much bigger consideration at play. Have a look at the many, many threads on here about condensation, dampness and mould. In most cases, it is caused by lifestyle and inadequate ventilation. Aside from cooking, showering and breathing, one of the main culprits is drying clothes indoors on racks or radiators.

    Get the vented tumble dryer and get the water out of your house. A dehumidifier is a sticking plaster to correct a mistake.
    • Strider590
    • By Strider590 11th Sep 17, 1:15 PM
    • 11,622 Posts
    • 6,529 Thanks
    Strider590
    • #4
    • 11th Sep 17, 1:15 PM
    • #4
    • 11th Sep 17, 1:15 PM
    On the other hand a dryer pumps hot air through the clothes and then outside, wasting energy. A dehumidifier operates in an enclosed area, it uses less power and it's a great way to make the house feel cooler on hot/humid days, BUT it's a very slow way to dry clothes.
    “I may not agree with you, but I will defend to the death your right to make an a** of yourself.”

    <><><><><><><><><<><><><><><><><><><><><><> Don't forget to like and subscribe \/ \/ \/
    • Grenage
    • By Grenage 11th Sep 17, 1:24 PM
    • 1,312 Posts
    • 1,241 Thanks
    Grenage
    • #5
    • 11th Sep 17, 1:24 PM
    • #5
    • 11th Sep 17, 1:24 PM
    I would choose a heat-pump tumble drier; efficient and it does what you need.

    A dehumidifier to pull water out of the air after leaving wet clothes around is not a great way to go.
    • scottishblondie
    • By scottishblondie 11th Sep 17, 2:46 PM
    • 1,974 Posts
    • 1,253 Thanks
    scottishblondie
    • #6
    • 11th Sep 17, 2:46 PM
    • #6
    • 11th Sep 17, 2:46 PM
    Having used both as a means of drying clothes, get a tumble drier. The dehumidifier takes forever, makes a racket, and you have to have the clothes hanging out taking up space while it goes. The tumble drier is designed to dry clothes, and does a much better job of it much more quickly! I have a condensing one I I have no means of venting to the outside, it generates a nice amount of heat as well which is not lost to the outside, something that I consider a nice bonus.
    • Cisco001
    • By Cisco001 11th Sep 17, 5:25 PM
    • 2,721 Posts
    • 1,159 Thanks
    Cisco001
    • #7
    • 11th Sep 17, 5:25 PM
    • #7
    • 11th Sep 17, 5:25 PM
    1. Do you have space for tumble dryer?
    2. can most of your clothes tumble dry?
    • Callie22
    • By Callie22 11th Sep 17, 6:23 PM
    • 2,901 Posts
    • 7,911 Thanks
    Callie22
    • #8
    • 11th Sep 17, 6:23 PM
    • #8
    • 11th Sep 17, 6:23 PM
    I have a heat-pump condenser dryer and I love it. I have spent years trying various ways of drying laundry, from racks, heated racks to dehumidifiers and so on and nothing works as well and as quickly as a tumble dryer. The winter nightmare of trying to get thick towels and superking-size bedding dry in a reasonable amount of time is no more, my washing smells better and I can get the laundry done over one day a week, rather than it hanging round practically all week and still not feeling properly dry. The house is drier too. I know they're not the greenest option but drying washing indoors isn't particularly healthy (or 'green' if you're having to crank up the heating anyway) so if you've got the space and cash for a tumble dryer then I would go for it.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 11th Sep 17, 7:01 PM
    • 30,307 Posts
    • 18,124 Thanks
    getmore4less
    • #9
    • 11th Sep 17, 7:01 PM
    • #9
    • 11th Sep 17, 7:01 PM
    The heat pump dryers are the way to go.
    A bit more expensive but the margins are dropping and the running costs are much better.

    Focus on the annual cost and condenser efficiency(90%+ is good).

    when I was looking there clearly were some step changes in the ratings for models where a set of newer models all had the same better rating against a previous batch.(there are the outliers at the silly money that were clearly ahead on the tech)

    for 8kg you want energy 230kwh or lower
    some hotpoint are over 300kwh and only a tiny bit cheaper

    Grundig(Beko in disguise) come with 5y warranty.
    • benjus
    • By benjus 11th Sep 17, 7:16 PM
    • 5,002 Posts
    • 3,074 Thanks
    benjus
    I use a dehumidifier (desiccating type rather than compressor) combined with a ceiling-suspended drying rack and it works brilliantly. OK, it's not as fast as a dryer - it takes a couple of hours to dry a load of light clothes, longer for towels and suchlike. But as it's essentially the same as line drying it's gentle on the clothes, doesn't crease them and can be used with delicate fabrics.

    The comments above about dehumidifiers cooling the room and making a racket were probably talking about compressor models. Desiccating dehumidifiers actually make the room slightly warmer and don't make much noise. They are also better suited to the British climate than compressor models. Mine is an Ecoair DD122 MK5.
    Let's settle this like gentlemen: armed with heavy sticks
    On a rotating plate, with spikes like Flash Gordon
    And you're Peter Duncan; I gave you fair warning
    • lstar337
    • By lstar337 12th Sep 17, 8:53 AM
    • 3,263 Posts
    • 1,756 Thanks
    lstar337
    We have and use both.

    We have a condensing tumble dryer which works great, but around half of our clothes can't be put in it.

    We have a desiccant dehumidifier (minimal noise and more efficient than compressor type) which we use on half power setting overnight. Everything is dry by morning.

    If I could only have one I would go for the tumble, but only because the tumble uses less space to dry clothes.
    Last edited by lstar337; 13-09-2017 at 10:17 AM.
    • JustAnotherSaver
    • By JustAnotherSaver 12th Sep 17, 8:54 PM
    • 2,564 Posts
    • 410 Thanks
    JustAnotherSaver
    1. Do you have space for tumble dryer?
    Originally posted by Cisco001
    Dehumidifier model: Amcor SD12
    Tumble dryer model: Hotpoint TVM570
    Originally posted by JustAnotherSaver
    The models were given because i don't know what figures anyone would need to calculate costs. I'm crap with electrics.

    • JustAnotherSaver
    • By JustAnotherSaver 12th Sep 17, 8:56 PM
    • 2,564 Posts
    • 410 Thanks
    JustAnotherSaver
    I use a dehumidifier (desiccating type rather than compressor) combined with a ceiling-suspended drying rack and it works brilliantly. OK, it's not as fast as a dryer - it takes a couple of hours to dry a load of light clothes, longer for towels and suchlike. But as it's essentially the same as line drying it's gentle on the clothes, doesn't crease them and can be used with delicate fabrics.

    The comments above about dehumidifiers cooling the room and making a racket were probably talking about compressor models. Desiccating dehumidifiers actually make the room slightly warmer and don't make much noise. They are also better suited to the British climate than compressor models. Mine is an Ecoair DD122 MK5.
    Originally posted by benjus
    The model i have gives off cool air however the model my mother has does give off warm air.

    And of course whenever possible we actually use the line in the back garden to dry our clothes.

Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

5,070Posts Today

8,568Users online

Martin's Twitter