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    • 1865ST
    • By 1865ST 10th Sep 17, 9:30 PM
    • 40Posts
    • 14Thanks
    1865ST
    Offer accepted on house...
    • #1
    • 10th Sep 17, 9:30 PM
    Offer accepted on house... 10th Sep 17 at 9:30 PM
    I've recently had an offer accepted on a house. The house is empty and has been for several months though it's in very good condition. The owner has apparently moved to a different part of the country.

    I was wondering how in depth my solicitors checks would be on checking to see if the seller is indeed the real owner of the property, I'm concerned about house fraud. The seller is very keen to get the deal completed asap.

    Thanks for any help.
Page 1
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 10th Sep 17, 9:53 PM
    • 3,079 Posts
    • 4,257 Thanks
    Cakeguts
    • #2
    • 10th Sep 17, 9:53 PM
    • #2
    • 10th Sep 17, 9:53 PM
    Your solicitors would do this normally even if the sellers weren't in a different part of the country. This is part of the searches work that they do.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 11th Sep 17, 12:52 AM
    • 23,556 Posts
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    Davesnave
    • #3
    • 11th Sep 17, 12:52 AM
    • #3
    • 11th Sep 17, 12:52 AM
    The seller is probably keen to see completion because having an empty house in another part of the country is a worry and a financial drain.

    You are paying a solicitor to do all the necessary work to ensure the seller has good title to the property, so you don't need to be concerned. They will also be paying for professional insurance, which would cover costs in the unlikely event of any fraud succeeding.

    You say the house is in good condition. Is this based on a surveyor's buildings survey, or your own observations? Most problems people have with houses are related to structural weaknesses, not defects in the title.
    Last edited by Davesnave; 11-09-2017 at 12:54 AM.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • 1865ST
    • By 1865ST 11th Sep 17, 7:16 AM
    • 40 Posts
    • 14 Thanks
    1865ST
    • #4
    • 11th Sep 17, 7:16 AM
    • #4
    • 11th Sep 17, 7:16 AM
    The solictors have professional insurance? What's it called?

    Just my own observations....new boiler, kitchen, bathroom, windows etc.

    I am planning on having a full structural survey done.

    The seller also asked to see my proof of funds which made me a little wary.

    Thanks for the replies.
    • tom9980
    • By tom9980 11th Sep 17, 7:37 AM
    • 1,233 Posts
    • 3,704 Thanks
    tom9980
    • #5
    • 11th Sep 17, 7:37 AM
    • #5
    • 11th Sep 17, 7:37 AM
    The solictors have professional insurance? What's it called?

    Just my own observations....new boiler, kitchen, bathroom, windows etc.

    I am planning on having a full structural survey done.

    The seller also asked to see my proof of funds which made me a little wary.

    Thanks for the replies.
    Originally posted by 1865ST
    Nothing unusual at all, everything you have mentioned is normal and indeed common practice.
    “In order to change, we must be sick and tired of being sick and tired.”
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 11th Sep 17, 8:09 AM
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    Davesnave
    • #6
    • 11th Sep 17, 8:09 AM
    • #6
    • 11th Sep 17, 8:09 AM
    The solictors have professional insurance? What's it called?.
    Originally posted by 1865ST
    Believe it or not, 'professional indemnity insurance' or PII.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 11th Sep 17, 8:15 AM
    • 6,096 Posts
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    davidmcn
    • #7
    • 11th Sep 17, 8:15 AM
    • #7
    • 11th Sep 17, 8:15 AM
    They will also be paying for professional insurance, which would cover costs in the unlikely event of any fraud succeeding.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    Hmm. It would cover the solicitors in the event they're accused of having been negligent, it's not an absolute guarantee that there couldn't be a loss resulting from the other party being fraudulent. But the mere fact that the seller doesn't live in the property isn't in itself a warning sign of anything - it's perfectly normal.

    The sellers' solicitors require to check their clients' ID (though are limits to how far you can go to confirm that the Joe Bloggs sitting in front of you is the same Joe Bloggs who is the registered proprietor!).

    There's also the guarantee provided by land registration - once you have a registered title then (assuming you've acted in good faith) you have a good title. It's the "real" previous owners who bear more of a risk from any such fraud (all they can do is claim cash from the land registry, rather than get their house back). But such cases are incredibly rare, I know they make for sensationalist newspaper articles. Find something else to worry about - you'll have plenty of options coming up!
    • catshark88
    • By catshark88 11th Sep 17, 2:02 PM
    • 949 Posts
    • 6,254 Thanks
    catshark88
    • #8
    • 11th Sep 17, 2:02 PM
    • #8
    • 11th Sep 17, 2:02 PM

    The seller also asked to see my proof of funds which made me a little wary.
    Originally posted by 1865ST
    Why???? The seller needs to know that you are able to proceed!
    "Have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful." William Morris
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