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  • FIRST POST
    • MrLeo
    • By MrLeo 10th Sep 17, 7:52 PM
    • 4Posts
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    MrLeo
    Savings threshold question.
    • #1
    • 10th Sep 17, 7:52 PM
    Savings threshold question. 10th Sep 17 at 7:52 PM
    Hey guys. I just joined today !

    i have a question about savings and how that can affect benefits such as Income based JSA or UC etc. So far, i know that savings of £6000 or less does not affect anyone's money. They get the highest rate as long as it's no more than 6000. But what happens if someone is on the borderline and they may possible go up and over that frequently?

    So if someone had, say, £5,900 when they first claim IB JSA or even at any other point in the claim. As far as i understand , this is disregarded and doesn't affect the person's rate of maximum benefit pay? But then say after they receive their first payment of, say, IB JSA of £146 and now they have £6046 in the bank. Do they have to phone up or say that they are now over the 6000 and have to declare that and have the rate of award dropped?

    then say another week goes past and they have , say, the phone bill and this costs, say, £70. After they pay that, they are now back to £5976. Do they need to phone up again and say its now again under the £6.000 to get back the full IB JSA again? Then they get their next payment of JSA £146 and they are back over the 6000 because of that... .and so on and so on.

    basically what happens if you are close to the borderline and by virtue of receiving your payments, then paying a bill, food, expenses, receiving another payment etc, you are constantly hopping a little bit over and a bit under that 6,000 threshold?

    I know you have to have a cutoff point somewhere, but in a situation like that, it seems a bit confusing as to what you'd do or what should happen? I'm not in this situation, but it makes you think that you'd rather try and spend some of your savings in the meantime to keep you away from the £6,000 limit to avoid what might be hassle?
Page 1
    • decbel
    • By decbel 10th Sep 17, 8:24 PM
    • 1,494 Posts
    • 1,616 Thanks
    decbel
    • #2
    • 10th Sep 17, 8:24 PM
    • #2
    • 10th Sep 17, 8:24 PM
    I know what I would do and that's ignore it.

    Administrative nightmare otherwise.

    If the savings are quickly rising then that's a different matter.

    You could of course take a few hundred quid out as emergency money and hide it in the house.
    • epitome
    • By epitome 10th Sep 17, 8:57 PM
    • 2,986 Posts
    • 1,818 Thanks
    epitome
    • #3
    • 10th Sep 17, 8:57 PM
    • #3
    • 10th Sep 17, 8:57 PM
    Hey guys. I just joined today !

    i have a question about savings and how that can affect benefits such as Income based JSA or UC etc. So far, i know that savings of £6000 or less does not affect anyone's money. They get the highest rate as long as it's no more than 6000. But what happens if someone is on the borderline and they may possible go up and over that frequently?

    So if someone had, say, £5,900 when they first claim IB JSA or even at any other point in the claim. As far as i understand , this is disregarded and doesn't affect the person's rate of maximum benefit pay? But then say after they receive their first payment of, say, IB JSA of £146 and now they have £6046 in the bank. Do they have to phone up or say that they are now over the 6000 and have to declare that and have the rate of award dropped?
    Originally posted by MrLeo
    Yes

    then say another week goes past and they have , say, the phone bill and this costs, say, £70. After they pay that, they are now back to £5976. Do they need to phone up again and say its now again under the £6.000 to get back the full IB JSA again?
    Yes

    Then they get their next payment of JSA £146 and they are back over the 6000 because of that... .and so on and so on.
    Essentially Yes, but only because you are not expected to know the rules of the benefit, and must therefore declare any changes in circumstances. But for the record, benefit payments are disregarded for (I think) 2 weeks, so you would only have to phone if, after 2 weeks, you still had over £6000.

    I know you have to have a cutoff point somewhere, but in a situation like that, it seems a bit confusing as to what you'd do or what should happen? I'm not in this situation, but it makes you think that you'd rather try and spend some of your savings in the meantime to keep you away from the £6,000 limit to avoid what might be hassle?
    It would make life easier if you somehow divulged yourself of about £500 so you did not keep going over and under the threshold, pay back that loan you took out, or buy yourself a new fridge assuming the old one is not sufficient.
    Last edited by epitome; 10-09-2017 at 8:59 PM.
    • Ames
    • By Ames 10th Sep 17, 9:05 PM
    • 16,496 Posts
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    Ames
    • #4
    • 10th Sep 17, 9:05 PM
    • #4
    • 10th Sep 17, 9:05 PM
    Benefit payments are not counted as capital during the payment period of that benefit.

    If you get JSA paid fortnightly, it doesn't count during that fortnight.

    So if JSA is paid on the 1st of the month, only what's left on the 16th of the month counts as savings.

    If a benefit were paid monthly, it would only count as savings after a month.
    Unless I say otherwise 'you' means the general you not you specifically.

    Reading the alphabet in 2017. 21/100
    ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
    • Ames
    • By Ames 10th Sep 17, 9:08 PM
    • 16,496 Posts
    • 28,886 Thanks
    Ames
    • #5
    • 10th Sep 17, 9:08 PM
    • #5
    • 10th Sep 17, 9:08 PM
    Yes

    Yes

    Essentially Yes, but only because you are not expected to know the rules of the benefit, and must therefore declare any changes in circumstances. But for the record, benefit payments are disregarded for (I think) 2 weeks, so you would only have to phone if, after 2 weeks, you still had over £6000.

    It would make life easier if you somehow divulged yourself of about £500 so you did not keep going over and under the threshold, pay back that loan you took out, or buy yourself a new fridge assuming the old one is not sufficient.
    Originally posted by epitome
    You can't do that with a loan, only overdrafts or credit cards where payment in full is due. A loan has scheduled payments and if paid off early would count as deprivation of capital, and the claimant treated as still having the money.

    The claimant is expected to know the rules of any benefit they claim.
    Last edited by Ames; 10-09-2017 at 9:15 PM.
    Unless I say otherwise 'you' means the general you not you specifically.

    Reading the alphabet in 2017. 21/100
    ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
    • MrLeo
    • By MrLeo 10th Sep 17, 9:14 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    MrLeo
    • #6
    • 10th Sep 17, 9:14 PM
    • #6
    • 10th Sep 17, 9:14 PM

    It would make life easier if you somehow divulged yourself of about £500 so you did not keep going over and under the threshold, pay back that loan you took out, or buy yourself a new fridge assuming the old one is not sufficient.
    Originally posted by epitome
    And that's what they'd probably prefer. you'd be putting something back into circulation rather than saving money in an account keeping it out of the economy.

    The 2 weeks thing seems sensible so there's a bit of room to maneuver there.. If you go a bit over, you have a couple weeks to spend it or whatever. Mind you, They probably wouldn't be too keen on someone phoning them up every week cause their money keeps ducking and diving around some predetermined cut off point and then they keep having to mess around a new calculation and keep updating something far more frequently. That's where mistakes end up getting made. Some people might see this as spending money a bit unnecessarily on something you don't really need just to keep a few more pounds per week, though [if its supposed to be £1 deduction for every week you're over by £250.]

    Either that or you withdraw some and then just have to keep it in a biscuit tin and keep that if some emergency happens. Save if you like, but not too much. LOL
    • Ames
    • By Ames 10th Sep 17, 9:18 PM
    • 16,496 Posts
    • 28,886 Thanks
    Ames
    • #7
    • 10th Sep 17, 9:18 PM
    • #7
    • 10th Sep 17, 9:18 PM
    And that's what they'd probably prefer. you'd be putting something back into circulation rather than saving money in an account keeping it out of the economy.

    The 2 weeks thing seems sensible so there's a bit of room to maneuver there.. If you go a bit over, you have a couple weeks to spend it or whatever. Mind you, They probably wouldn't be too keen on someone phoning them up every week cause their money keeps ducking and diving around some predetermined cut off point and then they keep having to mess around a new calculation and keep updating something far more frequently. That's where mistakes end up getting made. Some people might see this as spending money a bit unnecessarily on something you don't really need just to keep a few more pounds per week, though [if its supposed to be £1 deduction for every week you're over by £250.]

    Either that or you withdraw some and then just have to keep it in a biscuit tin and keep that if some emergency happens. Save if you like, but not too much. LOL
    Originally posted by MrLeo
    The forms ask how much you have in cash. It's part of your savings so has to be declared.

    Is it really worth commiting benefit fraud for an extra £1 in benefit?

    (It's £1 for every £250 or part thereof - so if you have £6001 that loses £1 in benefit).
    Unless I say otherwise 'you' means the general you not you specifically.

    Reading the alphabet in 2017. 21/100
    ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
    • decbel
    • By decbel 10th Sep 17, 9:27 PM
    • 1,494 Posts
    • 1,616 Thanks
    decbel
    • #8
    • 10th Sep 17, 9:27 PM
    • #8
    • 10th Sep 17, 9:27 PM
    The forms ask how much you have in cash. It's part of your savings so has to be declared.

    Is it really worth commiting benefit fraud for an extra £1 in benefit?

    (It's £1 for every £250 or part thereof - so if you have £6001 that loses £1 in benefit).
    Originally posted by Ames
    Seriously.

    Come on.
    • epitome
    • By epitome 10th Sep 17, 9:40 PM
    • 2,986 Posts
    • 1,818 Thanks
    epitome
    • #9
    • 10th Sep 17, 9:40 PM
    • #9
    • 10th Sep 17, 9:40 PM
    You can't do that with a loan, only overdrafts or credit cards where payment in full is due. A loan has scheduled payments and if paid off early would count as deprivation of capital, and the claimant treated as still having the money.
    Originally posted by Ames
    Possibly, possibly not, deprivation of capital is only decided upon if the claimant did something for the sole purpose of being entitled to more benefit or to avoid a reduction in benefit. If the reason for paying off the loan was soley taken because the claimant thought it was the prudent thing to do, or it was his intention all along to pay it off, or he has a track record of taking out loans and paying them back early, then he is not breaking from his usual pattern and would not IMHO fall foul of deprivation of capital rules. There is also the fact that the claimant could do this whilst below £6000 and therefore the claimant is unaware of any future event that might take them over £6000. The claimant is therfore below threshold. and continues to be below threshold after shelling out £500. There is therefore curently no gain in benefits for having divested £500, and can therefore be no deprivation decision as there is no reduction from a position that was "above threshold".
    The claimant is expected to know the rules of any benefit they claim.
    I disagree. I know a lot about ESA. An ordinary claimant could not possibly be expected to know as much as I do about ESA. There is more that I do not know about ESA than that which I do know. If I were to claim JSA or Income Support I would not have much of a clue compared to my position if I were to claim ESA.

    A claimant is not expected to know the rules of any benefit they are claiming, show me where that is said. It is impossible for any one person to know everything about any one benefit let alone a multitude of different benefits.

    A claimant of any benefit is expected to follow instructions, if they are asked to return a form or attend an interview, they should do so. And in ALL cases they are expected to report any change in circumstances that might affect the benefit the are recieving.

    So, I said "Essentially Yes, but only because you are not expected to know the rules of the benefit, and must therefore declare any changes in circumstances." Which means, because the average Joe would not know that benefit payments are disregarded for the period of that payment,..........They would be expected by the DWP to inform the DWP that their savings balance has increased by £146.20 and this has taken them over the £6000 threshold. If the claimant knows the rule that payments of benefit are disregarded for a period, then that claimant would know that their effective savings balance is still below £6000 and therefore there is no need to inform the DWP. For anyone else, who does not know the rules of the benefit they are expected to report the change in circumstance.
    Last edited by epitome; 10-09-2017 at 9:47 PM.
    • decbel
    • By decbel 10th Sep 17, 9:50 PM
    • 1,494 Posts
    • 1,616 Thanks
    decbel
    Possibly, possibly not, deprivation of capital is only decided upon if the claimant did something for the sole purpose of being entitled to more benefit or to avoid a reduction in benefit. If the reason for paying off the loan was soley taken because the claimant thought it was the prudent thing to do, or it was his intention all along to pay it off, or he has a track record of taking out loans and paying them back early, then he is not breaking from his usual pattern and would not IMHO fall foul of deprivation of capital rules. There is also the fact that the claimant could do this whilst below £6000 and therefore the claimant is unaware of any future event that might take them over £6000. The claimant is therfore below threshold. and continues to be below threshold after shelling out £500. There is therefore curently no gain in benefits for having divested £500, and can therefore be no deprivation decision as there is no reduction from a position that was "above threshold".
    I disagree. I know a lot about ESA. An ordinary claimant could not possibly be expected to know as much as I do about ESA. There is more that I do not know about ESA than that which I do know. If I were to claim JSA or Income Support I would not have much of a clue compared to my position if I were to claim ESA.

    A claimant is not expected to know the rules of any benefit they are claiming, show me where that is said. It is impossible for any one person to know everything about any one benefit let alone a multitude of different benefits.

    A claimant of any benefit is expected to follow instructions, if they are asked to return a form or attend an interview, they should do so. And in ALL cases they are expected to report any change in circumstances that might affect the benefit the are recieving.

    So, I said "Essentially Yes, but only because you are not expected to know the rules of the benefit, and must therefore declare any changes in circumstances." Which means, because the average Joe would not know that benefit payments are disregarded for the period of that payment,..........They would be expected by the DWP to inform the DWP that their savings balance has increased by £146.20 and this has taken them over the £6000 threshold. If the claimant knows the rule that payments of benefit are disregarded for a period, then that claimant would know that their effective savings balance is still below £6000 and therefore there is no need to inform the DWP. For anyone else, who does not know the rules of the benefit they are expected to report the change in circumstance.
    Originally posted by epitome
    I'd agree with you on the complexity of benefit rules.

    But as they say ignorance is no defence in law.

    I think the OP would be better off taking a bit out and no one would be any the wiser.

    If the savings rise then that's a different matter.
    Last edited by decbel; 10-09-2017 at 9:53 PM.
    • epitome
    • By epitome 10th Sep 17, 9:53 PM
    • 2,986 Posts
    • 1,818 Thanks
    epitome
    And that's what they'd probably prefer. you'd be putting something back into circulation rather than saving money in an account keeping it out of the economy.

    The 2 weeks thing seems sensible so there's a bit of room to maneuver there.. If you go a bit over, you have a couple weeks to spend it or whatever. Mind you, They probably wouldn't be too keen on someone phoning them up every week cause their money keeps ducking and diving around some predetermined cut off point and then they keep having to mess around a new calculation and keep updating something far more frequently. That's where mistakes end up getting made. Some people might see this as spending money a bit unnecessarily on something you don't really need just to keep a few more pounds per week, though [if its supposed to be £1 deduction for every week you're over by £250.]

    Either that or you withdraw some and then just have to keep it in a biscuit tin and keep that if some emergency happens. Save if you like, but not too much. LOL
    Originally posted by MrLeo
    And consider those who do not know about the thresholds being £6,000 & £16,000 Because they do not know, they would be expected to inform the DWP if their savings went from 1,000 to 1,500

    They would of course quickly find out from the DWP staff telling them "Yeah that's ok, just tell us if it goes over £6,000"
    But if don't know or they forget the rules, then they should be constantly updating the DWP with their savings balance.

    LOL indeed.
    • MrLeo
    • By MrLeo 10th Sep 17, 9:58 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    MrLeo
    The forms ask how much you have in cash. It's part of your savings so has to be declared.

    Is it really worth commiting benefit fraud for an extra £1 in benefit?

    (It's £1 for every £250 or part thereof - so if you have £6001 that loses £1 in benefit).
    Originally posted by Ames
    but if you spend £500 whilst you were under the £6000.01 anyway, then that's not deprivation. You can do what you want with your money there. If you spend £500 in some fancy diamond ring when you had £6400 to get to 5900, then that would be different.
    • decbel
    • By decbel 10th Sep 17, 10:00 PM
    • 1,494 Posts
    • 1,616 Thanks
    decbel
    I agree with a point made earlier in the thread that if you keep ringing up the DWP a mistake is going to be made.

    Years ago our tax credits claim was stopped and a huge overpayment was asked for.

    I scanned the renewal form and noticed that a decimal point on our earnings was in the wrong place.
    • MrLeo
    • By MrLeo 10th Sep 17, 10:06 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    MrLeo
    And consider those who do not know about the thresholds being £6,000 & £16,000 Because they do not know, they would be expected to inform the DWP if their savings went from 1,000 to 1,500

    They would of course quickly find out from the DWP staff telling them "Yeah that's ok, just tell us if it goes over £6,000"
    But if don't know or they forget the rules, then they should be constantly updating the DWP with their savings balance.

    LOL indeed.
    Originally posted by epitome
    i actually had no idea of the lower threshold until recently. I actually thought the total cut off limit was £6000. I didn't know about the 16,000. I thought over 6,000 you weren't entitles to anything. LOL

    Anyway, if someone went over 6000 and it stayed there but no more than 6250 for a whole year, they'd only have been overpaid £52 in the year at the rate of £1 per week. Wouldn't be any fuss to pay back that overpayment and that could happen just because someone didn't know. I'll bet 95% of claimants don't know that.

    What about if in a whole year, someone went over 6000 just a once or twice for only a few weeks in the whole year? Be a bit pedantic to have to pay back only a few pounds over a whole year. They could average it over the whole year and not even bother to deduct it.
    • skcollobcat10
    • By skcollobcat10 10th Sep 17, 10:22 PM
    • 223 Posts
    • 2,172 Thanks
    skcollobcat10
    Possibly, possibly not, deprivation of capital is only decided upon if the claimant did something for the sole purpose of being entitled to more benefit or to avoid a reduction in benefit. If the reason for paying off the loan was soley taken because the claimant thought it was the prudent thing to do, or it was his intention all along to pay it off, or he has a track record of taking out loans and paying them back early, then he is not breaking from his usual pattern and would not IMHO fall foul of deprivation of capital rules. There is also the fact that the claimant could do this whilst below £6000 and therefore the claimant is unaware of any future event that might take them over £6000. The claimant is therfore below threshold. and continues to be below threshold after shelling out £500. There is therefore curently no gain in benefits for having divested £500, and can therefore be no deprivation decision as there is no reduction from a position that was "above threshold".
    I disagree. I know a lot about ESA. An ordinary claimant could not possibly be expected to know as much as I do about ESA. There is more that I do not know about ESA than that which I do know. If I were to claim JSA or Income Support I would not have much of a clue compared to my position if I were to claim ESA.

    A claimant is not expected to know the rules of any benefit they are claiming, show me where that is said. It is impossible for any one person to know everything about any one benefit let alone a multitude of different benefits.

    A claimant of any benefit is expected to follow instructions, if they are asked to return a form or attend an interview, they should do so. And in ALL cases they are expected to report any change in circumstances that might affect the benefit the are recieving.

    So, I said "Essentially Yes, but only because you are not expected to know the rules of the benefit, and must therefore declare any changes in circumstances." Which means, because the average Joe would not know that benefit payments are disregarded for the period of that payment,..........They would be expected by the DWP to inform the DWP that their savings balance has increased by £146.20 and this has taken them over the £6000 threshold. If the claimant knows the rule that payments of benefit are disregarded for a period, then that claimant would know that their effective savings balance is still below £6000 and therefore there is no need to inform the DWP. For anyone else, who does not know the rules of the benefit they are expected to report the change in circumstance.
    Originally posted by epitome
    Could I possibly ask a question about savings and deprivation of capital. I purchased outright wav vehicle because Motability wanted £22000 deposit every 5 years. I sold my flat to buy my van cheaper because on contribution based disabled benefits and no means tested. Where would I stand because I would next have to save mobility portion of benefits for the next 10 years to buy another van to the equivalent of what I have now.
    • epitome
    • By epitome 11th Sep 17, 9:55 PM
    • 2,986 Posts
    • 1,818 Thanks
    epitome
    Could I possibly ask a question about savings and deprivation of capital. I purchased outright wav vehicle because Motability wanted £22000 deposit every 5 years. I sold my flat to buy my van cheaper because on contribution based disabled benefits and no means tested. Where would I stand because I would next have to save mobility portion of benefits for the next 10 years to buy another van to the equivalent of what I have now.
    Originally posted by skcollobcat10
    I can't advise until I know more about you.

    You said Contributory Benefits... What do you mean?
    Are you currently on ESA Conts? How much is your award of ESA Conts per week?
    Why are you on Conts and not Income Related?
    What is your Marital status? Partner working? or partner claiming other benefits?
    I know you used to have £22000 in savings but how much do you have now?
    Is there any reason you think you will soon be on Income Related ESA?

    Most Conts claimants have both Conts and IR, they don't realise this and think they are only conts but they actually have IR aswell. If you don't know you should phone ESA and ask..the following
    On screen JA504:
    What amount is showing on ESA Conts and what amount is showing on ESA IR

    On screen JA523:
    What is the unadjusted total?
    What is the adjusted total?
    What is the ESA Conts total top left?
    Press F4 what amounts are showing and what are they for?
    Press F5 What amounts are showing and what are they for?
    • skcollobcat10
    • By skcollobcat10 12th Sep 17, 8:06 AM
    • 223 Posts
    • 2,172 Thanks
    skcollobcat10
    I can't advise until I know more about you.

    You said Contributory Benefits... What do you mean?
    Are you currently on ESA Conts? How much is your award of ESA Conts per week?
    Why are you on Conts and not Income Related?
    What is your Marital status? Partner working? or partner claiming other benefits?
    I know you used to have £22000 in savings but how much do you have now?
    Is there any reason you think you will soon be on Income Related ESA?

    Most Conts claimants have both Conts and IR, they don't realise this and think they are only conts but they actually have IR aswell. If you don't know you should phone ESA and ask..the following
    On screen JA504:
    What amount is showing on ESA Conts and what amount is showing on ESA IR

    On screen JA523:
    What is the unadjusted total?
    What is the adjusted total?
    What is the ESA Conts total top left?
    Press F4 what amounts are showing and what are they for?
    Press F5 What amounts are showing and what are they for?
    Originally posted by epitome
    Hello

    I receive contribution based esa support group, dla high care & mobility, iidb, civil service ill health retirement pension, plus 2 smaller pensions.

    Partner disabled, receives Esa support group, dla high care and small pension.

    I do not receive any means tested benefits not entitled to any.

    Get discount on c tax for wheelchair use and pay full rent of accomodation. I was able to afford vehicle because of flat sale. Paid for vehicle outright did not go through motability.

    If I save mobility portion of dla for next 5 - 10 years, (been disabled 17 years), will that mean saved money for next new wav after reaching £16000 threshold would start to be taxed by benefits office?

    I feel it would be unfair if I do manage to save for next new wav for the money to be taxed because it is purely to keep me independently mobile in my wheelchair. On top of purchasing vehicle pay for all maintenance & insurance too. We only have 1 taxi company in a 40 mile radius of where I live and am unable to use bus service.
    • bspm
    • By bspm 12th Sep 17, 8:39 AM
    • 439 Posts
    • 678 Thanks
    bspm
    Hello

    I receive contribution based esa support group, dla high care & mobility, iidb, civil service ill health retirement pension, plus 2 smaller pensions.

    Partner disabled, receives Esa support group, dla high care and small pension.

    I do not receive any means tested benefits not entitled to any.

    Get discount on c tax for wheelchair use and pay full rent of accomodation. I was able to afford vehicle because of flat sale. Paid for vehicle outright did not go through motability.

    If I save mobility portion of dla for next 5 - 10 years, (been disabled 17 years), will that mean saved money for next new wav after reaching £16000 threshold would start to be taxed by benefits office?

    I feel it would be unfair if I do manage to save for next new wav for the money to be taxed because it is purely to keep me independently mobile in my wheelchair. On top of purchasing vehicle pay for all maintenance & insurance too. We only have 1 taxi company in a 40 mile radius of where I live and am unable to use bus service.
    Originally posted by skcollobcat10

    I'm sorry I do not understand what you mean by the Benefits Office, why would they tax you, you do not get any means tested benefits so unsure where the tax comes in.
    • Ames
    • By Ames 12th Sep 17, 12:40 PM
    • 16,496 Posts
    • 28,886 Thanks
    Ames
    If you're above the savings limit then it causes money to be taken off means tested benefits. It's not an extra tax. If you're not on means tested benefits then there's no benefit to reduce. You can have as much in savings as you want.
    Unless I say otherwise 'you' means the general you not you specifically.

    Reading the alphabet in 2017. 21/100
    ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
    • letthemeatcake
    • By letthemeatcake 12th Sep 17, 2:57 PM
    • 203 Posts
    • 130 Thanks
    letthemeatcake
    In order to replace your current vehicle, which you were able to purchase due to a flat sale, you'd need to save on a regular basis but once the current £6000 of savings was reached you would start to lose any means tested benefit.

    If you were to receive a lump sum for any reason (inheritance for example) then you would probably be able to purchase a WAV but if saving up over the years it would affect your benefit payments.

    Maybe you could save the £6000 as a deposit and then take out a loan for the balance and pay it off although I understand getting a loan or paying for the loan might be difficult in years to come.

    Or use the savings as a deposit and get another vehicle through the motability scheme if you get higher rate DLA/PIP.
    Last edited by letthemeatcake; 12-09-2017 at 3:02 PM.
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