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  • FIRST POST
    • Lysimache
    • By Lysimache 10th Sep 17, 6:27 PM
    • 60Posts
    • 21Thanks
    Lysimache
    Period property's back windows: timber v uPVC? Value v longevity?
    • #1
    • 10th Sep 17, 6:27 PM
    Period property's back windows: timber v uPVC? Value v longevity? 10th Sep 17 at 6:27 PM
    Hello.

    I'm buying a 19th Century period property in a conservation zone. It's not listed.

    There are strict LA rules regarding the front of the house - windows must be replaced like for like, timber for timber, absolutely no uPVC whatsoever.

    The back for the (terraced) house has no such rules. These windows also aren't as elegantly designed as the front in terms of being 'unique' in their window-frame designs. Off the shelf window frames will match them just fine. They're single-glazed and timber (and need replacing).

    I'm going to replace them for double-glazing for energy-efficiency reasons and to minimize condensation dripping on frames.

    My question is - for BACK windows, is there any huge value in having timber double-glazed windows rather than uPVC double-glazed in terms of maximising the house's value?

    So front and back all have the same material of window frame, even if one side is single glazed and the other side is double-glazed?

    Or should I just go with what works for my living convenience given our bedrooms are at the back, and let just the front of the house give off that Victorian timbered 1870s look?

    Looking at the other houses, some are uPVC, some are timber windowed at the back so people go with a mix. Any advice appreciated please .
Page 1
    • aneary
    • By aneary 10th Sep 17, 7:13 PM
    • 741 Posts
    • 617 Thanks
    aneary
    • #2
    • 10th Sep 17, 7:13 PM
    • #2
    • 10th Sep 17, 7:13 PM
    I hate uPVC but I'm a carpenter's daughter, but in a period property wood suits them.

    Wood will actually last if looked after.
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 10th Sep 17, 7:50 PM
    • 6,090 Posts
    • 5,840 Thanks
    davidmcn
    • #3
    • 10th Sep 17, 7:50 PM
    • #3
    • 10th Sep 17, 7:50 PM
    I would consider how much it affects the interior of the rooms - if they're already lacking other period features then perhaps less of an issue.

    Must admit I just went for UPVC when I replaced my back windows - all the surrounding flats had already done likewise so if anything I'm now more in keeping with the neighbourhood...
    • G_M
    • By G_M 10th Sep 17, 8:14 PM
    • 41,917 Posts
    • 48,511 Thanks
    G_M
    • #4
    • 10th Sep 17, 8:14 PM
    • #4
    • 10th Sep 17, 8:14 PM
    Obviously the advantages of upvc are it's likely to be cheaper, and will require less maintenance.

    If those are your priorities, then go for that.

    But if you have the money, and are prepared to re-paint every few years, I'd suggest wood to keep it in keeping with the property and area.

    Have you costed each (remember upvc window firms vary hugely in how much they'll rip you off....)? What's the difference?
    • deannatrois
    • By deannatrois 10th Sep 17, 10:46 PM
    • 4,847 Posts
    • 6,805 Thanks
    deannatrois
    • #5
    • 10th Sep 17, 10:46 PM
    • #5
    • 10th Sep 17, 10:46 PM
    You could have double glazed timber framed windows put in. If more standard windows, they shouldn't be prohibitively expensive. PVC windows blow and need replacing or work doing.., they don't last any longer than well maintained wood frame windows. It doesn't take long to repaint them.
    • Clutterfree
    • By Clutterfree 10th Sep 17, 11:03 PM
    • 3,465 Posts
    • 18,976 Thanks
    Clutterfree
    • #6
    • 10th Sep 17, 11:03 PM
    • #6
    • 10th Sep 17, 11:03 PM
    So relieved that you are keeping the front timber because I hate, hate, hate plastic windows in a period property.

    That said, if you want to go down the upvc route with the back ones, you could try the woodgrained look ones. I don't mean the brown ones, but you can get them in various colours, so if you paint the front ones cream then choose cream, etc.

    We used CWG Choices in our previous property. We were very happy with them and because it was an old cottage we chose black handles, Georgian bars etc. We will be using them again when replacing the windows and doors at the back of this property.

    http://cwgchoices.com/choices-colours-and-woodgrains/
    Ageing is a privilege not everyone gets
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 11th Sep 17, 12:59 AM
    • 23,552 Posts
    • 89,404 Thanks
    Davesnave
    • #7
    • 11th Sep 17, 12:59 AM
    • #7
    • 11th Sep 17, 12:59 AM
    There are some very good upvc windows these days, but they won't be cheap ones.

    If you are like me, there is never a good time to paint windows.....
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • G_M
    • By G_M 11th Sep 17, 10:58 AM
    • 41,917 Posts
    • 48,511 Thanks
    G_M
    • #8
    • 11th Sep 17, 10:58 AM
    • #8
    • 11th Sep 17, 10:58 AM
    Plus if you go down the wood road, pay the extra and use good quality hard wood, not a soft wood.
    • ReadingTim
    • By ReadingTim 11th Sep 17, 6:21 PM
    • 2,151 Posts
    • 3,048 Thanks
    ReadingTim
    • #9
    • 11th Sep 17, 6:21 PM
    • #9
    • 11th Sep 17, 6:21 PM
    Depends on how long you're thinking of staying in the property. Timber may last longer, but will need maintenance after (say) 5 years otherwise it gradually decays.

    uPVC may not last as long, but will probably be fine for longer, then more suddenly or quickly fail after (say) 15 years.

    But if you're not likely to be in the property in 15 years time, a failure of plastic windows won't be your problem, whereas painting wooden windows in 5 years time probably will be...
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