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    • aloise
    • By aloise 10th Sep 17, 5:13 PM
    • 562Posts
    • 411Thanks
    aloise
    first direct refusing joint account
    • #1
    • 10th Sep 17, 5:13 PM
    first direct refusing joint account 10th Sep 17 at 5:13 PM
    I have been with FD for about 30 years. I had a joint acount with mtyy husband but he diedd 4 years ago,and since it has been a single account.
    I am now 80 ans partially sighted, with a heart condition and not very mobile due to server gout. My daughter has to do modst of my shopping and she needs to be able to access my account to get money for this. I have applied twice to FD but have been refused each time. She is emPloyed and has her own bank account so won't be putting any money in to the account, which i did explain to them.
    I can't understand what the problem is as surely i can. be the only eldely person to need this.
    Is there a bank who will let me do this. I am very reluctant to mouve banks as i have always had excellent service from FD,
    Last edited by aloise; 10-09-2017 at 5:15 PM.
Page 1
    • YorkshireBoy
    • By YorkshireBoy 10th Sep 17, 5:24 PM
    • 29,397 Posts
    • 17,173 Thanks
    YorkshireBoy
    • #2
    • 10th Sep 17, 5:24 PM
    • #2
    • 10th Sep 17, 5:24 PM
    Sounds like she doesn't have the necessary funds to 'sub' you the shopping money? So could you not send her a 'float' of say £200. Then, as she spends money just top the 'float' up by the same amount?


    Alternatively, get an FD credit card and add her as an additional cardholder.


    Move to a bank allowing someone else to carry out basic branch banking on your behalf (as I can do by being an 'agent to operate' with my father's Yorkshire Bank current account).
    • oldagetraveller
    • By oldagetraveller 10th Sep 17, 5:26 PM
    • 2,937 Posts
    • 1,446 Thanks
    oldagetraveller
    • #3
    • 10th Sep 17, 5:26 PM
    • #3
    • 10th Sep 17, 5:26 PM
    Is there any reason you can't transfer money to your daughter's account after she has done your shopping and presented you with the bill?
    Yorkshire Boy beat me to it and his "float" suggestion has to be the easiest solution?
    Did you hear about the politician who had a backside transplant? It rejected him.
    • Robin9
    • By Robin9 10th Sep 17, 5:31 PM
    • 1,646 Posts
    • 1,071 Thanks
    Robin9
    • #4
    • 10th Sep 17, 5:31 PM
    • #4
    • 10th Sep 17, 5:31 PM
    Have you POA that would enable your daughter to operate the account ?
    Never pay on an estimated bill
    • Katgrit
    • By Katgrit 10th Sep 17, 8:21 PM
    • 468 Posts
    • 1,261 Thanks
    Katgrit
    • #5
    • 10th Sep 17, 8:21 PM
    • #5
    • 10th Sep 17, 8:21 PM
    You wouldn't necessarily need a joint account, or for your Daughter to have Power of Attourney. Some banks will give a named 3rd party access to the account. Barclays do as my Mum was all ready for having access to my 93 yr old Grandads account, so she could help in the exact kind of situation you're describing. Which Grandad thought was excellent so she could take money out and pay bills for him etc and they were there in branch in the little back office, all ready to sign, and the Branch Staff mentioned "and check your balances" and then Grandad backed out. He was more than happy for her to have access to his money,but only if she didn't know how much he had!

    I'm sure First Direct would do something similar. It was keeping it as HIS account, not changing it to a joint one. In the nicest way possible, make a point of laying out on thick that you need it because of your age. And I mean that with total respect, I'm in awe of people of your distinguished age embracing technology, internet forums and the like. I wish my Grandad had your grasp on the world!!

    Hope you can get something sorted with FD.
    • Keep pedalling
    • By Keep pedalling 10th Sep 17, 8:55 PM
    • 3,560 Posts
    • 3,831 Thanks
    Keep pedalling
    • #6
    • 10th Sep 17, 8:55 PM
    • #6
    • 10th Sep 17, 8:55 PM
    You would be very wise to set up a Lasting Power of Attorney, this would not only allow her to manage your current account, but any other transaction with organisations like the DWP, council or utilities. This is particularly important if you ever become totally incapacitated through accident or illness.
    • LABMAN
    • By LABMAN 10th Sep 17, 8:55 PM
    • 638 Posts
    • 1,009 Thanks
    LABMAN
    • #7
    • 10th Sep 17, 8:55 PM
    • #7
    • 10th Sep 17, 8:55 PM
    Transfer automatically each month a set amount that more than covers your shopping to your daughters bank account. Your daughter can return any surplus to you in cash that you can use for day to day expenses?
    Je suis Parisien
    • xylophone
    • By xylophone 10th Sep 17, 9:14 PM
    • 22,855 Posts
    • 13,207 Thanks
    xylophone
    • #8
    • 10th Sep 17, 9:14 PM
    • #8
    • 10th Sep 17, 9:14 PM
    How about opening a joint account at your daughter's bank ( which would be in addition to her own account) to which only you contribute.

    You could set up a regular standing order from first direct to this account.

    Your daughter would have her own debit card which she would use only to make purchases on your behalf.
    • aloise
    • By aloise 11th Sep 17, 11:35 AM
    • 562 Posts
    • 411 Thanks
    aloise
    • #9
    • 11th Sep 17, 11:35 AM
    • #9
    • 11th Sep 17, 11:35 AM
    Is there any reason you can't transfer money to your daughter's account after she has done your shopping and presented you with the bill?
    Yorkshire Boy beat me to it and his "float" suggestion has to be the easiest solution?
    Originally posted by oldagetraveller
    She has barely enough to pay her rent and bills.(she works for a supermarket chain so mpney is not very good ) She doesn't want her bank uswd at all for my needs, and is worried in case my money ovelaps to hers. She recievs no benifits at all so that wouldn't be the issue, just in case anyone was wondering.
    • aloise
    • By aloise 11th Sep 17, 11:37 AM
    • 562 Posts
    • 411 Thanks
    aloise
    [QUOTE=Keep pedalling;73107129]You would be very wise to set up a Lasting Power of Attorney, this would not only allow her to manage your current account, but any other transaction with organisations like the DWP, council or utilities. This is particularly important if you ever become totally incapacitated through accident or illness.[/QUOTE

    got one of these but for another daughter who lives to far away for what i need]
    neither does she want me to be a joint holder in her account.
    • eskbanker
    • By eskbanker 11th Sep 17, 12:17 PM
    • 5,466 Posts
    • 5,269 Thanks
    eskbanker
    She has barely enough to pay her rent and bills.(she works for a supermarket chain so mpney is not very good )
    Originally posted by aloise
    Have FD told you why they're refusing to add her to the account? It could be that her credit status isn't up to their expectations, and this could also hinder attempts to open a joint account elsewhere if you still feel this is a better option than the other suggestions.

    She doesn't want her bank uswd at all for my needs, and is worried in case my money ovelaps to hers.
    Originally posted by aloise
    She could open a second account with her bank, or even another bank, to keep things separate?

    You would be very wise to set up a Lasting Power of Attorney, this would not only allow her to manage your current account, but any other transaction with organisations like the DWP, council or utilities. This is particularly important if you ever become totally incapacitated through accident or illness.
    Originally posted by Keep pedalling
    got one of these but for another daughter who lives to far away for what i need
    Originally posted by aloise
    Seems odd to set up POA with someone who isn't really in a position to fulfil the relevant tasks, have you considered changing it?
    • Katgrit
    • By Katgrit 11th Sep 17, 4:34 PM
    • 468 Posts
    • 1,261 Thanks
    Katgrit
    Aloise,
    I can't reply to your message because it looks like you've set your profile to refuse Private Messages.

    Just be warned that I was passed round about 4 people who all told me NO until I got someone who grasped what I was talking about. I work in healthcare so I knew a few good phrases to throw into conversation. I made it very clear he had full capacity for financial matters but didn't understand modern things like Chip & pin, accounts being "locked", and passwords for telephone banking.

    Hope it works out for you. If not I can thoroughly recommend Barclays!

    Take care now
    • xylophone
    • By xylophone 11th Sep 17, 7:02 PM
    • 22,855 Posts
    • 13,207 Thanks
    xylophone
    Post 8.

    Open a joint account with your daughter at her current bank - this would be in addition to her sole account.

    Or just open a joint account with another bank.

    Once opened, you alone fund it by standing order from your FD account.

    Your daughter uses her own debit card to make purchases on your behalf.
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