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  • FIRST POST
    • alexanderalexander
    • By alexanderalexander 10th Sep 17, 9:35 AM
    • 286Posts
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    alexanderalexander
    how to install wireless access points throughout house
    • #1
    • 10th Sep 17, 9:35 AM
    how to install wireless access points throughout house 10th Sep 17 at 9:35 AM
    I'm having a house renovated, and as it's quite spread out (over three storeys) with lots of internal walls I thought it'd be a good idea to get some permanent wireless access points fitted. However I'm not very technical at all so I am finding the process a bit confusing! Could anyone very kindly help with the following:
    • Would each access point simply individually connect to my router via ethernet cable? (which would plug into the LAN ports on the back of my router -- if I don't have enough LAN ports I know I can use a switch to add more)
    • Presumably each access point also needs a mains power supply alongside its ethernet connection?
    • Once the access points are powered and connected to my router, will they work immediately? Or is some kind of configuration needed?
    • Can anyone recommend a set of wireless access points to buy? There seem to be so many on the market and as I say I'm not very technically minded so the advertised specifications don't mean much to me!
    Very grateful indeed for any help.
Page 1
    • Tarambor
    • By Tarambor 10th Sep 17, 10:31 AM
    • 1,585 Posts
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    Tarambor
    • #2
    • 10th Sep 17, 10:31 AM
    • #2
    • 10th Sep 17, 10:31 AM
    Yes, you can cable them. Personally if it were me I'd use a mix of wired and wireless. Wired for example run to the room which is going to be a home office and the one where your entertainment equipment (TV/Sky box/Games console) is going to be, personally I'd have a wired RJ45 socket in each room and you can do that when the electrician is doing their first fix and place the network socket near a mains socket. Number each of the RJ45 faceplates and access points and each of the cables feeding them at the switch end of each cable with the same number to help fault diagnosis in the future. Nothing worse than turning up to a networking fault with 16 cables plugged into a switch with no labelling then having to figure out which one goes to the room where there is a fault.

    You can get stuff which uses Power Over Ethernet, PoE but you need your switch to support it to supply the devices. Ubiquity wifi network gear which I recommend for a serious install uses PoE.

    For access points, personally I'd use Ubiquiti UAC access points placing them on the ceiling, one on each floor to provide coverage as the picture below. These are commercial units so work very well.

    Last edited by Tarambor; 10-09-2017 at 10:42 AM.
    • alexanderalexander
    • By alexanderalexander 10th Sep 17, 12:46 PM
    • 286 Posts
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    alexanderalexander
    • #3
    • 10th Sep 17, 12:46 PM
    • #3
    • 10th Sep 17, 12:46 PM
    Thank you very much for your advice.

    So, if I just buy a 3-pack like this one and connect them to my router by ethernet cable via a switch like this one, will it basically be a one-off "plug in and go"? (Or could I even just run a cheaper switch which doesn't do Power-over-Ethernet using the PoE adaptor that is provided?). I'm a bit worried as one of the reviews mentions web management software, but is this only necessary if you want to particularly optimise the connection?
    Last edited by alexanderalexander; 10-09-2017 at 12:51 PM.
    • Tarambor
    • By Tarambor 10th Sep 17, 1:33 PM
    • 1,585 Posts
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    Tarambor
    • #4
    • 10th Sep 17, 1:33 PM
    • #4
    • 10th Sep 17, 1:33 PM
    Yes pretty much that and use either the switch or the adapter but the adapter means one more plug and one more set of leads per device so doing it with the switch makes it a lot neater. Personally though I'd look at the APs they do that do both 2.4GHz and 5GHz. Whilst the ones you listed are 802.11n it is 2.4GHz only and if you do a quick wifi scan of the area you'll find that 2.4GHz is jam packed full of wifi networks and there's not many wifi networks at all on 5GHz.

    The web management software is very good and using it is no different to how you would configure your wireless network on your ISP provided router. It does however have more advanced options for those who want to do tweaking to wring every last ounce of performance out of them.
    • I have spoken
    • By I have spoken 10th Sep 17, 1:42 PM
    • 4,963 Posts
    • 9,656 Thanks
    I have spoken
    • #5
    • 10th Sep 17, 1:42 PM
    • #5
    • 10th Sep 17, 1:42 PM
    Plenty of Youtube videos on Ubuquiti PoE installs, e.g.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=btot71A-Qyc
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 10th Sep 17, 3:28 PM
    • 7,728 Posts
    • 5,514 Thanks
    esuhl
    • #6
    • 10th Sep 17, 3:28 PM
    • #6
    • 10th Sep 17, 3:28 PM
    • Would each access point simply individually connect to my router via ethernet cable? (which would plug into the LAN ports on the back of my router -- if I don't have enough LAN ports I know I can use a switch to add more)
    Originally posted by alexanderalexander

    Yep -- that's exactly right.


    • Presumably each access point also needs a mains power supply alongside its ethernet connection?
    Originally posted by alexanderalexander

    Yep -- unless you use PoE (power over ethernet). The "simple" way is just to have a plug socket handy for each access point.



    • Once the access points are powered and connected to my router, will they work immediately? Or is some kind of configuration needed?
    Originally posted by alexanderalexander

    No -- you'll need to configure them. Configuration should be fairly minimal -- it's really just a case of making sure the access points are on the correct subnet.


    To set them up, you'll need to disconnect a PC from your network and plug it in to the access point with an Ethernet cable. You should then be able to configure the settings by typing in an IP or web address into a browser.



    • Can anyone recommend a set of wireless access points to buy? There seem to be so many on the market and as I say I'm not very technically minded so the advertised specifications don't mean much to me!
    Originally posted by alexanderalexander
    I'm not sure which ones are any good, but I'd start by looking at some of the well-known brands, like TP-Link, Linksys, Netgear, Cisco, etc.
    • alexanderalexander
    • By alexanderalexander 10th Sep 17, 6:09 PM
    • 286 Posts
    • 160 Thanks
    alexanderalexander
    • #7
    • 10th Sep 17, 6:09 PM
    • #7
    • 10th Sep 17, 6:09 PM
    Thank you again to everyone who has replied.

    Plenty of Youtube videos on Ubuquiti PoE installs, e.g.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=btot71A-Qyc
    Originally posted by I have spoken
    Thank you that video was very useful. It did raise a couple of questions for me though:
    -- he installs a new router (which he describes as a "unified gateway"), but would my existing bog standard ISP-provided router do without any modification?
    -- he also installs a "cloud key"; I have to admit it wasn't really at clear to me why that was necessary. Should I just get one and not worry about what it's actually doing?
    • gazter
    • By gazter 11th Sep 17, 4:41 PM
    • 917 Posts
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    gazter
    • #8
    • 11th Sep 17, 4:41 PM
    • #8
    • 11th Sep 17, 4:41 PM
    If you want a non technical,solution that does all the hard work for you, google Wi-fi might be a better solution for you. I hear good things about it.
    • forgotmyname
    • By forgotmyname 11th Sep 17, 11:28 PM
    • 26,047 Posts
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    forgotmyname
    • #9
    • 11th Sep 17, 11:28 PM
    • #9
    • 11th Sep 17, 11:28 PM
    Being renovated, just run CAT6 cables.
    Punctuation, Spelling and Grammar will be used sparingly. Due to rising costs of inflation.

    My contribution to MSE. Other contributions will only be used if they cost me nothing.

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    • stator
    • By stator 12th Sep 17, 12:30 AM
    • 5,894 Posts
    • 3,877 Thanks
    stator
    The best approach is to install Ethernet cables under the floorboards if possible, that's the most reliable method

    If that isn't possible then buy some HomePlug WiFi extenders. They let your Wifi devices connect to a local access point and connect to your router over your powerlines.
    Changing the world, one sarcastic comment at a time.
    • alexanderalexander
    • By alexanderalexander 14th Sep 17, 10:30 AM
    • 286 Posts
    • 160 Thanks
    alexanderalexander
    Thanks again to everyone who's replied.


    At risk of being a bit needy, can anyone enlighten me re the below:
    Thank you that video was very useful. It did raise a couple of questions for me though:
    -- he installs a new router (which he describes as a "unified gateway"), but would my existing bog standard ISP-provided router do without any modification?
    -- he also installs a "cloud key"; I have to admit it wasn't really at clear to me why that was necessary. Should I just get one and not worry about what it's actually doing?
    Originally posted by alexanderalexander
    • forgotmyname
    • By forgotmyname 14th Sep 17, 5:26 PM
    • 26,047 Posts
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    forgotmyname
    You can add additional routers to extend the wireless signal.

    Dont bother with all that just run cables. No loss of speed, every socket gets the full internet speed with no worries about signal strength etc.
    Punctuation, Spelling and Grammar will be used sparingly. Due to rising costs of inflation.

    My contribution to MSE. Other contributions will only be used if they cost me nothing.

    Due to me being a tight git.
    • Tarambor
    • By Tarambor 14th Sep 17, 7:17 PM
    • 1,585 Posts
    • 1,090 Thanks
    Tarambor
    Thank you again to everyone who has replied.



    Thank you that video was very useful. It did raise a couple of questions for me though:
    -- he installs a new router (which he describes as a "unified gateway"), but would my existing bog standard ISP-provided router do without any modification?
    -- he also installs a "cloud key"; I have to admit it wasn't really at clear to me why that was necessary. Should I just get one and not worry about what it's actually doing?
    Originally posted by alexanderalexander
    Yes your bog standard router will do just fine.

    You don't need to do a cloud key. That is basically a computer on a stick for setting up and running a cloud system so unless you're planning on setting up your own internet connected storage at home wanting it to work like Google Drive or Microsoft OneDrive you don't need to worry about it.
    • paddyrg
    • By paddyrg 14th Sep 17, 7:32 PM
    • 13,079 Posts
    • 11,141 Thanks
    paddyrg
    Cabled is the way to go for best results and most future-proof. If you cannot do that, you could look at a mesh topology like the cloudtrax system (although it's a bit more advanced than you need), but you can do that and are cabling, and that's always the best bet.
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