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    • Saga
    • By Saga 9th Sep 17, 10:57 PM
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    Saga
    Noisy Neighbours/
    • #1
    • 9th Sep 17, 10:57 PM
    Noisy Neighbours/ 9th Sep 17 at 10:57 PM
    Apologies for all my recent naive potential FTB newbie questions. Just wondering: most of the properties in my likely affordability bracket are terraced houses but through years of renting I know I'm a bit noise-sensitive. What fool-proof steps can potential buyers take when it comes to ensuring potential properties have sufficient noise insulation and/or neighbours are not of the antisocial variety?
    ---
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    • rtho782
    • By rtho782 9th Sep 17, 11:10 PM
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    • #2
    • 9th Sep 17, 11:10 PM
    • #2
    • 9th Sep 17, 11:10 PM
    If you're that sensitive perhaps don't buy a terraced house, whatever you do, don't move in then demand other people change their lives to accommodate you!
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    • rjwr
    • By rjwr 9th Sep 17, 11:20 PM
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    rjwr
    • #3
    • 9th Sep 17, 11:20 PM
    • #3
    • 9th Sep 17, 11:20 PM
    You need to buy a house that isnt attached to anything else to avoid neighbour noise.
    But never spend money you don't have to buy things you don't want to impress people you don't like.
    .
    Originally posted by kidmugsy
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 9th Sep 17, 11:24 PM
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    Cakeguts
    • #4
    • 9th Sep 17, 11:24 PM
    • #4
    • 9th Sep 17, 11:24 PM
    Go for an end terrace preferably where the front doors are next to each other so that the living room is on the end furthest away from the neighbours.
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 9th Sep 17, 11:55 PM
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    • #5
    • 9th Sep 17, 11:55 PM
    • #5
    • 9th Sep 17, 11:55 PM
    Nothing foolproof, other than reducing the risk by having fewer neighbours.
    • hazyjo
    • By hazyjo 10th Sep 17, 12:04 AM
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    • #6
    • 10th Sep 17, 12:04 AM
    • #6
    • 10th Sep 17, 12:04 AM
    Visit at different times of the day/night.

    But, as above, nothing is foolproof, and you can't really tell if homes are rented or owned. The turnover of occupiers may be higher if rented. If bought, they could sell or rent it out at any time.

    As someone mentioned, 'halls adjoining' is a good start. A semi with that would be better than a terrace (if poss).

    I've lived in new, Victorian and '30s. I've been lucky with neighbours, but none have been silent!
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    • missile
    • By missile 10th Sep 17, 12:13 AM
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    missile
    • #7
    • 10th Sep 17, 12:13 AM
    • #7
    • 10th Sep 17, 12:13 AM
    Beware converted properties. Older e.g. Victorian properties have thicker walls. Newer properties have to comply with sound insulation regulations.

    Might be good neighbours today can change tomorrow. If you are noise intolerant, you might be better renting. Move on if neighbours become a problem.
    "A nation's greatness is measured by how it treats its weakest members." ~ Mahatma Gandhi
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    • Tom99
    • By Tom99 10th Sep 17, 2:24 AM
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    • #8
    • 10th Sep 17, 2:24 AM
    • #8
    • 10th Sep 17, 2:24 AM
    As well as the above tips, ask when you visit about noise, if you are shown round by the estate agent ask them to enquire of the seller.

    They will probably lie to you or downgrade any problems they have had.

    When you submit an offer make the estate agent aware you are relying on the answers you have been given about noise.

    Then ask your solicitor to add a specific question to the enquiries before contract to confirm the answers you have been given are being relied on.

    The above might help a little but in anything other than a detached house you are bound to get some noise through the walls and floors.
    • cjdavies
    • By cjdavies 10th Sep 17, 8:28 AM
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    cjdavies
    • #9
    • 10th Sep 17, 8:28 AM
    • #9
    • 10th Sep 17, 8:28 AM
    As well as the above tips, ask when you visit about noise, if you are shown round by the estate agent ask them to enquire of the seller.

    They will probably lie to you or downgrade any problems they have had.

    When you submit an offer make the estate agent aware you are relying on the answers you have been given about noise.

    Then ask your solicitor to add a specific question to the enquiries before contract to confirm the answers you have been given are being relied on.

    The above might help a little but in anything other than a detached house you are bound to get some noise through the walls and floors.
    Originally posted by Tom99
    Problem is people like me who are not noise senistive, e.g. my Mum once came over and said you can hear the little girl cry next door, I couldn't, so they may not be lying.
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 10th Sep 17, 8:56 AM
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    davidmcn
    Beware converted properties. Older e.g. Victorian properties have thicker walls. Newer properties have to comply with sound insulation regulations.
    Originally posted by missile
    Depends. Older "standards" often didn't amount to much. My current place was converted into flats in the 1980s, and you can hear more through the (1880s) party wall than you can from the flat downstairs. A previous 1920s semi was much the same - could hear everything going on in next door's bathroom!

    ask when you visit about noise, if you are shown round by the estate agent ask them to enquire of the seller.

    When you submit an offer make the estate agent aware you are relying on the answers you have been given about noise.

    Then ask your solicitor to add a specific question to the enquiries before contract to confirm the answers you have been given are being relied on.
    Originally posted by Tom99
    But what specific enquiries are you making? "Are the neighbours noisy" is too subjective. And it doesn't help that much - you still end up owning a property which you're unhappy with, but with the "bonus" of a potentially expensive and fruitless opportunity to sue the seller.
    • BrassicWoman
    • By BrassicWoman 10th Sep 17, 9:37 AM
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    BrassicWoman
    I live in a flat and have the quiestest neighbours ever, having lived in semis and mid terraced.

    Detached is the only way to be sure!
    Downsized and mortgage free
    Nov17 grocery challenge £133.10/£150
    • Saga
    • By Saga 10th Sep 17, 9:44 AM
    • 40 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Saga
    Thanks everyone.
    ---
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    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 10th Sep 17, 9:44 AM
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    If you're that sensitive perhaps don't buy a terraced house, whatever you do, don't move in then demand other people change their lives to accommodate you!
    Originally posted by rtho782
    Not a very nice reply.

    One can only afford what one can afford. I had to have a terrace house for many years before moving to a detached latterly.

    Think about it - no-one ever complains the neighbours are too quiet. But an awful lot of people complain about noisy neighbours.

    I have a theory that those saying "put up and shut up" are the noisy neighbours that are being complained about
    #MeToo

    Why should our needs override the needs of all other living species? What makes us so special? (Brigit Strawbridge)
    • tightasagnats
    • By tightasagnats 10th Sep 17, 10:25 AM
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    tightasagnats
    In a Victorian terrace with side returns, you may get more noise at the back in your bedroom from the bathrooms/kitchens that face into the side return. So a bedroom at the front may work well for you if the street is relatively quiet. Earplugs are great at night. Double glazing is also important, so go for a place that is double glazed or do the windows you can afford in the rooms that you're affected in the most.
    • artyclarty
    • By artyclarty 10th Sep 17, 10:38 AM
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    artyclarty
    I have lived in a few terraces growing up, as a student and in the real world. I will be honest, as a student living in a street full of students, I never heard a thing from either side! In my first terrace house with my partner, the only thing I heard was the neighbours yappy lap dog in the back yard.

    Around here, terraces cost nearly double what the council semis within the same few streets do. Our ex council house is twice the size of the terrace the next street over and has off street parking for 3 cars!
    The compromise was that is was in an ex council area and that next door was let. Was always quiet on viewings as the tenant was on the opposite shift to myself and partner. Turns out the normal was parties from midnight till 6am Friday and Saturday whilst the kid was at grandma's, enough to make the floors shake and I had to be up for work at 3am!!

    Next door has now been purchased and have nice quiet neighbours, and although you can still hear a lot of things, they foster dogs so there is always going to be barking! The insulation is non-existant!!

    The point is, it entirely depends on the construction of the house and what you are willing to put up with. There is not much you can do after moving in, so if it bothers you enough to be worried, it is just about checking the best you can in viewings, although as we found out this is far from foolproof!

    Good Luck!!
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 10th Sep 17, 11:12 AM
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    Norman Castle
    I have a theory that those saying "put up and shut up" are the noisy neighbours that are being complained about
    Originally posted by moneyistooshorttomention
    Exactly. Try convincing a noisy neighbour they are noisy. I've been in the same flat for decades and have had a variety of neighbours. The biggest factor in the amount of noise between properties is down to the people living there.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.
    • dinkylink
    • By dinkylink 10th Sep 17, 11:37 AM
    • 147 Posts
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    dinkylink
    I would agree with the comment that if you're going to go terraced, it's probably best to go modern.

    My brother lived in a middle new build town house for a couple of years and had no problems with noise.

    Friends lived in a middle Edwardian terraced house and when I went round you could practically hear their conversations next door as if they were in the same room.

    I also remember a colleague at work who spoke about her friend's experience a couple of years ago. Apparently he had bought a mid terraced house, 1970s private build I think and he was also finding it hard to adjust to the levels of 'normal' noise coming from his neighbours.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 10th Sep 17, 12:24 PM
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    In a Victorian terrace with side returns, you may get more noise at the back in your bedroom from the bathrooms/kitchens that face into the side return. So a bedroom at the front may work well for you if the street is relatively quiet. Earplugs are great at night. Double glazing is also important, so go for a place that is double glazed or do the windows you can afford in the rooms that you're affected in the most.
    Originally posted by tightasagnats
    Depends on the style of the house. In the Victorian terrace I used to have the back bedroom of the two was quieter. It was the one facing out the back onto my "courtyard garden" (ie partly my side return). The house to the right of me (whose blimmin' great extension wall formed the right side wall of my courtyard garden) didnt have any windows in it (their bathroom and kitchen windows were on their other side wall and out of sight of my house).

    I had to give up sleeping in my main bedroom (at front of house) and that was down to a tendency of the neighbours in the house the other side having their tv too loud/shouting to each other in lieu of talking to each other and the biggest crunch point was their alarm clock. My alarm clock was set to go off for work at a normal sort of time and I switched it off as soon as it had "done its job" and woken me up. Their alarm clock went off in the early hours (courtesy of them working antisocial hours) and they just let it "repeat" (even after I said it was disturbing me). So I ended up using both bedrooms - back bedroom to literally sleep in and my own bedroom to keep my clothes in and as a study.. I wasnt happy about it - as I'd decided to use my back bedroom as my study and my own bedroom to serve all "bedroom" purposes (ie sleep in it) and I wasnt able to because of them. Nearly forgot - and I could also hear their "recreational activities" in the bedroom sometimes...ahem...as they didnt "converse quietly" in that respect either and, of course, it got me worried my own privacy in that respect wasnt safe.
    Last edited by moneyistooshorttomention; 10-09-2017 at 12:31 PM.
    #MeToo

    Why should our needs override the needs of all other living species? What makes us so special? (Brigit Strawbridge)
    • cjdavies
    • By cjdavies 10th Sep 17, 12:37 PM
    • 2,791 Posts
    • 2,793 Thanks
    cjdavies
    I had to give up sleeping in my main bedroom (at front of house) and that was down to a tendency of the neighbours in the house the other side having their tv too loud/shouting to each other in lieu of talking to each other and the biggest crunch point was their alarm clock. My alarm clock was set to go off for work at a normal sort of time and I switched it off as soon as it had "done its job" and woken me up. Their alarm clock went off in the early hours (courtesy of them working antisocial hours) and they just let it "repeat" (even after I said it was disturbing me). So I ended up using both bedrooms - back bedroom to literally sleep in and my own bedroom to keep my clothes in and as a study.. I wasnt happy about it - as I'd decided to use my back bedroom as my study and my own bedroom to serve all "bedroom" purposes (ie sleep in it) and I wasnt able to because of them. Nearly forgot - and I could also hear their "recreational activities" in the bedroom sometimes...ahem...as they didnt "converse quietly" in that respect either and, of course, it got me worried my own privacy in that respect wasnt safe.
    Originally posted by moneyistooshorttomention
    Blimey, heaven forbid people can't even work now without some moaning about it.

    OP: Ask your neighbours what time do they get up for work (if they work).
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 10th Sep 17, 12:38 PM
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    Exactly. Try convincing a noisy neighbour they are noisy. I've been in the same flat for decades and have had a variety of neighbours. The biggest factor in the amount of noise between properties is down to the people living there.
    Originally posted by Norman Castle
    Couldnt agree more

    All well and good if you're noisy/selfish yourself - but if you're not then it's hardly fair.

    Having now spent about 45 years living on my own and with literally only two noise complaints in that time (one about using a hair-dryer at about 8 am of a weekday morning and the other by the same person about my radio being left on very low volume whilst I was at work - to "keep my pet company") then I think it's fair for me to expect quiet neighbours in return.
    #MeToo

    Why should our needs override the needs of all other living species? What makes us so special? (Brigit Strawbridge)
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