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    • prezzacc
    • By prezzacc 9th Sep 17, 10:31 PM
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    prezzacc
    Log store roof help
    • #1
    • 9th Sep 17, 10:31 PM
    Log store roof help 9th Sep 17 at 10:31 PM
    Hi guys,

    Asked some questions a while ago and wonder if I can ask for a bit more help!

    Have now built sides back and Base of store just the roof to go. I will be building a sub frame (simple 2x1 rectangular with centre rafter) I then plan to lay feather edge panels across and screw in at the sides and centre.

    The featheredge I found was from wickes 100m and 11m thick. I'm a little worried it's not going to be water tight! Is there anything I can do for a bit of double protection? Maybe felt underneath? I like the rustic look so don't want felt on top.

    Finally I like the natural color but as I've cut the wood should I use some form of preservative on the wood? Or will it last OK as is?

    Thanks you!
Page 1
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 10th Sep 17, 12:28 AM
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    Davesnave
    • #2
    • 10th Sep 17, 12:28 AM
    • #2
    • 10th Sep 17, 12:28 AM
    Feather edge is pretty watertight if the wood is well overlapped, the angle is steep enough and there's no warping. Wickes wood wasn't the best in the days when I used DIY sheds, but I have no idea about their quality now.

    You could put felt or polytunnel plastc on the sub-frame before attaching the featheredge, just to make sure.

    All featheredge should be pressure treated and I'd not worry about treating exposed ends myself. Theyt are going to dry out fast.

    If it's an open fronted store, you will get driven rain in at the front anyway, unless you can place it in a very sheltered position. I store most of my logs in sheds with tin roofs and no door. Rain can be driven inside to a distance of 1m or more sometimes. On one shed with a wide doo,r I hang black windbreak netting across it for a bit of extra protection.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • tony6403
    • By tony6403 10th Sep 17, 12:29 AM
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    tony6403
    • #3
    • 10th Sep 17, 12:29 AM
    • #3
    • 10th Sep 17, 12:29 AM
    My log store is made from deconstructed large pallets.
    The top is simply butt joined.
    The sides and back have 10mm gaps.
    Rain must surely get in but the logs do dry out to approx 20% moisture content according to my meter.
    Forgotten but not gone.
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 10th Sep 17, 12:29 AM
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    FreeBear
    • #4
    • 10th Sep 17, 12:29 AM
    • #4
    • 10th Sep 17, 12:29 AM
    A log store doesn't need to be absolutely water tight.. A piece of felt under the boards will certainly keep most of the water out. But it will trap water underneath the boards which will cause them to rot fairly quickly.

    If the boards overlap, you shouldn't need any additional felt as long as the timber is treated - Either with a wood preservative, or linseed oil (the latter will need reapplying once a year at least).

    I keep the bulk of my logs stacked on pallets and covered with a tarpaulin - They stay pretty dry like this, and until I get time/funds to build a "proper" shed, they'll remain outside.
    Last edited by FreeBear; 10-09-2017 at 12:32 AM.
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    • Kiran
    • By Kiran 10th Sep 17, 12:32 AM
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    Kiran
    • #5
    • 10th Sep 17, 12:32 AM
    • #5
    • 10th Sep 17, 12:32 AM
    One of my log stores just has feather edge boards, the water sheds fine off it. Ultimately the log store isn't water tight so any odd drips will just dry up as the timber seasons.

    If you used treated timber you can use end grain treatment on the cut edge. The log store will weather over time.
    Some people don't exaggerate........... They just remember big!
    • Tom99
    • By Tom99 10th Sep 17, 2:09 AM
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    Tom99
    • #6
    • 10th Sep 17, 2:09 AM
    • #6
    • 10th Sep 17, 2:09 AM
    I would just overlap the featheredge a bit more than normal and leave out the felt because as said above it will cause the roof to rot in due time
    • Apodemus
    • By Apodemus 10th Sep 17, 9:19 AM
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    Apodemus
    • #7
    • 10th Sep 17, 9:19 AM
    • #7
    • 10th Sep 17, 9:19 AM
    Probably doesn't need saying but screw the boards where the next board overlaps it. When I did this I was able to screw the boards down without pre-drilling and no splitting, but your wood quality/screw-size might result in splitting. With feather-edge, you might need a slightly steeper roof angle to ensure adequate run-off.
    • prezzacc
    • By prezzacc 10th Sep 17, 12:27 PM
    • 110 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    prezzacc
    • #8
    • 10th Sep 17, 12:27 PM
    • #8
    • 10th Sep 17, 12:27 PM
    Great responses.

    Thanks guys. I didn't think of the trapped water if I were to felt underneath. I'll just use the featheredge and see how it goes. It cost alot more than I thought (woods pricey!) so I want it to last as long as possible.

    Nothing silly to mention, this is my first wood project so take any help offered! Do you mean make sure the screws from the previous board are always overlapped? And I OK to screw both sides and the centre or will this cause the wood to warp? I'm. Not sure quite how level my build is!!
    • Apodemus
    • By Apodemus 10th Sep 17, 2:17 PM
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    Apodemus
    • #9
    • 10th Sep 17, 2:17 PM
    • #9
    • 10th Sep 17, 2:17 PM
    I just meant screw far enough up the board that the screw and it's hole are covered when you add the next board. I was assuming you will be fixing them with the feather edge up and the broad edge down (although it seems that many prefer the other way round). If so, you are fixing though the thinner wood and there is a balance between placing the screw through stronger wood, versus making sure the next board covers the screw.
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 10th Sep 17, 2:25 PM
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    EachPenny
    It cost alot more than I thought (woods pricey!) so I want it to last as long as possible.
    Originally posted by prezzacc
    Personally I'd give it several coats of an oil/spirit based timber preservative - not the water based pretty-colour stuff. You've invested in new wood and proper preservative is important to maintain the wood.

    Something else to bear in mind is firewood can be affected by woodworm, so any timber you want to keep (i.e. the log store) should at least have a long-lasting woodworm treatment, especially on any cut ends of pre-treated timber.
    "In the future, everyone will be rich for 15 minutes"
    • prezzacc
    • By prezzacc 28th Sep 17, 8:12 PM
    • 110 Posts
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    prezzacc
    So i finally got round to the roof. Cut all the pieces of featheredge and left them on top ready to screw in tonight, have just gone to look at them and 2 or 3 of the 10 pieces have warped! Not majorly. Ill still attach them , Maybe adding more battens and secure as much as possible, but i assume the warping will only get worse and i may need to replace these with better quality pieces?

    Thanks!
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 29th Sep 17, 7:06 AM
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    Davesnave
    The fact that the roof may rot faster with a membrane is as nothing against a roof that doesn't work.

    Others will not agree. As I said before, I used corrugated steel on my log stores, but aesthetics isn't a consideration, since I don't have to look at them.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 29th Sep 17, 10:02 AM
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    andrewf75
    How about coraline sheets?
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 29th Sep 17, 10:30 AM
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    Gloomendoom
    How about coraline sheets?
    Originally posted by andrewf75
    I have that on mine. It is waterproof and lasts for years. However, even if well supported, it soon goes saggy and looks a bit naff.

    I'm looking at it while I type. I'm going to rebuild it and use corrugated iron.
    Advice; it rhymes with mice. Advise; it rhymes with wise.
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 29th Sep 17, 2:32 PM
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    EachPenny
    The fact that the roof may rot faster with a membrane is as nothing against a roof that doesn't work.

    Others will not agree. As I said before, I used corrugated steel on my log stores, but aesthetics isn't a consideration, since I don't have to look at them.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    I was recently looking at cheap options for re-roofing a garden shed. Cheap felt doesn't last, expensive felt is well, expensive.

    In the past I've used a few acres of green plastisol coated steel sheeting, which I think is the optimum solution for durability and appearance (if you have deep pockets) but the current shed project will be housing contents a fraction of the value of the cost of plastisol steel so that wasn't really an option.

    In the end I've used a 'Proplex' surface protection sheet as a continuous waterproof layer underneath cheap felt. The sheet is fixed to the roof (chipboard), and the felt fixed to the sheet, both using construction adhesive. I'm not sure how long it is going to last, but the aim was a low-cost solution to see me through the winter at least... and if it lasts longer it will be a bonus.

    What occurred to me while fitting the Proplex was it gave a reasonable waterproof finish to the roof on its own, and the felt was possibly superfluous. I've decided to give it a try as a low-cost alternative to corrugated sheeting on a future project. The twin-wall construction gives it decent rigidity even though the sheet thickness is very small. I'm not sure about its durability (especially UV resistance) but at about £3 for a 1.2x2.4m sheet, waterproof roofing doesn't come much cheaper

    Although I didn't try it, one manufacturer claims their sheet can be bent (in one direction only) which made me think it might be feasible to make up ridge covers and side flashings too. That's an experiment for the future though.
    "In the future, everyone will be rich for 15 minutes"
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 29th Sep 17, 5:58 PM
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    Davesnave
    Again, not very elegant, I made a tall cold frame with removable top panels clad with polytunnel plastic. These lasted 10 years and stayed totally waterproof. As the frame was about 7m long and 2m deep, I could have stored a huge quantity of logs in there if I'd wanted to.

    To be blunt, I wouldn't give the typical log stores one sees for sale a second glance. They all look far too open to the elements, and small.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • Apodemus
    • By Apodemus 29th Sep 17, 8:21 PM
    • 954 Posts
    • 769 Thanks
    Apodemus
    Again, not very elegant, I made a tall cold frame with removable top panels clad with polytunnel plastic. These lasted 10 years and stayed totally waterproof. As the frame was about 7m long and 2m deep, I could have stored a huge quantity of logs in there if I'd wanted to.

    To be blunt, I wouldn't give the typical log stores one sees for sale a second glance. They all look far too open to the elements, and small.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    My No.2 log-store started life as a compost frame, but is now repurposed with a pallet floor and a "temporary" polythene sheet roof (1m x 1m x 1m - so very roughly a half tonne of dry firewood). Like so many of my projects, temporary becomes permanent unless it fails, and so far (two years in) the off-cuts of polythene are holding up much better than expected.

    I'd go for corrugated steel (wriggly tin in my lexicon!) if it was more readily available to buy as a single sheet and more easily transported.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 29th Sep 17, 8:51 PM
    • 23,585 Posts
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    Davesnave

    I'd go for corrugated steel (wriggly tin in my lexicon!) if it was more readily available to buy as a single sheet and more easily transported.
    Originally posted by Apodemus
    We have a distributor in Okehampton which sells seconds in any quantity, but from memory, the shortest length is 9' or 3m.

    All of mine came from a slightly reformed hoarder I met through eBay. Had about 60 sheets beside his drive!

    My neighbour here uses a few pallets to keep the wood off the ground and covers it with his kids' ex-swimming pool.
    Last edited by Davesnave; 29-09-2017 at 8:53 PM.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • Apodemus
    • By Apodemus 30th Sep 17, 8:15 AM
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    • 769 Thanks
    Apodemus
    We have a distributor in Okehampton which sells seconds in any quantity, but from memory, the shortest length is 9' or 3m.

    All of mine came from a slightly reformed hoarder I met through eBay. Had about 60 sheets beside his drive!

    My neighbour here uses a few pallets to keep the wood off the ground and covers it with his kids' ex-swimming pool.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    Your reformed hoarder was a good find. "Shrinkflation" has long been an issue with corrugated iron, with old sheets tending to be a much thicker gauge than more recent ones.

    I draw a distinction between my 2 log "stores" and my two log "piles".

    Store 1 is a home made A-frame (with parcel delivery shelf) that sits by the front door and is handy for the wood-burner on a snowy night. Store 2 is the one described above which is near the back door.

    Pile 1 is winter 18/19's fire-wood, 3m x 1m x1m, stacked on pallets, covered with a tarpaulin but open at the front (although the wood is actually dry enough that if I run out this winter it is ready to go). Pile 2 is random stuff that accumulates and is sitting out in the rain. I really should get in about it with the chain saw, but it provides winter shelter for wildlife.

    And none of this takes account of all the woodworking off-cuts that "might come in handy" but really ought to be used as kindling, or the shed-full of sticks and branches that drop out of the ash trees in the garden that are used as kindling! Endless fun keeping a fire!
    Last edited by Apodemus; 30-09-2017 at 8:18 AM.
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