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    • downlow
    • By downlow 7th Sep 17, 8:28 PM
    • 7Posts
    • 2Thanks
    downlow
    Lenovo Yoga 900s John Lewis Problem
    • #1
    • 7th Sep 17, 8:28 PM
    Lenovo Yoga 900s John Lewis Problem 7th Sep 17 at 8:28 PM
    Hi all, I was hoping for some advice. I recently purchased a Lenovo Yoga 900s laptop from John Lewis online (credit card). Approx 2 months after delivery I noticed 3 lighter spots on the LCD display, only visible with high brightness and light-coloured backgrounds. They were small, differently sized (not exact circles) and randomly distributed rather than clustered. The problem resembles that shown in the attached picture, originally uploaded by another Lenovo user, except I had three spots.

    [IMG]hwwps://lnv.i.lithium.com/t5/image/serverpage/image-id/48973iA587B41175FE6BE4?v=1.0[/IMG]

    I immediately returned it to John Lewis (JL), who had it inspected by a Lenovo group technician. JL tells me the internal display defect was attributed to 'pressure damage' by the technician. JL insists they are obliged to accept the technician's conclusion and on this basis are refusing my request for repair or replacement, unless I pay them more than £250 (the cost of the repair).

    I looked after the laptop very well. The display surface is in immaculate condition. The carbon-fibre laptop lid (rear of LCD) has no external dents or marks which would be associated with the kind of internal pressure damage.

    I'm not sure whether it is of any legal significance, but the Lenovo website which I reviewed prior to purchase describes the item as 'super-durable, thanks to its carbon-fibre design'. The website also cites John Lewis as one of its Selected Retailers.

    Regardless of the way it is described on the manufacturer's website, in terms of satisfactory quality for a laptop at this price point (over £700) it seems reasonable to expect a certain level of durability for its intended use. I am shocked as to how, given the nature of the internal display defect and complete absence of signs of pressure externally, JL can be denying my right for repair or replacement.

    This is of course presuming the damage diagnosed by the technician did not occur during manufacture, packaging or delivery to me. If this 'carbon-fibre' design laptop lacks durability to the point that it can incur internal pressure damage without any signs of external pressure damage, this seems feasible?

    Any advice regarding my consumer rights and next steps would be much appreciated.
Page 1
    • Leo2020
    • By Leo2020 8th Sep 17, 8:13 AM
    • 886 Posts
    • 651 Thanks
    Leo2020
    • #2
    • 8th Sep 17, 8:13 AM
    • #2
    • 8th Sep 17, 8:13 AM
    The pressure damage they are talking about is unlikely to be presdure applied from the outside. It is most likely pressure applied directly to the screen.

    It could be by holding the screen with your hand too hard. Touching the screen too forcibly (prodding). Could mean that you left something small like a paper clip on the keyboard before shutting the screen.
    • downlow
    • By downlow 9th Sep 17, 11:26 AM
    • 7 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    downlow
    • #3
    • 9th Sep 17, 11:26 AM
    • #3
    • 9th Sep 17, 11:26 AM
    Thanks for replying. Those scenarios aren't consistent with the damage though. The three brighter spots are scattered in quite a random way on different parts of the screen (e.g. rather than being where the laptop would be held or in a line/clustered as would be expected if something was closed in the laptop). Also, the spots are too small to have been caused by fingers. If would have needed to be something very pointy and if it was that pointy, would it not be reasonable to expect some kind of mark on the LCD surface? Obviously, it is a touchscreen device so some degree of pressure is expected during intended use, but it should be durable enough to withstand this.
    • Leo2020
    • By Leo2020 10th Sep 17, 8:46 PM
    • 886 Posts
    • 651 Thanks
    Leo2020
    • #4
    • 10th Sep 17, 8:46 PM
    • #4
    • 10th Sep 17, 8:46 PM
    Under the Consumer Rights Act and within the first 6 months of purchase it is assumed that any fault is inherent unless the retailer proves otherwise.

    Unfortunately they have proved otherwise, however I would ask for a copy of the report as a first step.

    White blobs are consistent with pressure damage however it is possible that the laptop has a design flaw which is causing pressure to build up behind the screen itself. However, proving this may not be easy and that is assuming that it is this, if not you could end up wasting money trying to prove it.

    You could take the laptop to be inspected by an independent repairer, they will charge for inspection and the writing of a report.

    As I suggested request a copy of the report from the manufacturer before going any further.
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