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  • FIRST POST
    • TyreLever
    • By TyreLever 7th Sep 17, 5:35 PM
    • 145Posts
    • 53Thanks
    TyreLever
    Do you need to be skilled to earn a living wage?
    • #1
    • 7th Sep 17, 5:35 PM
    Do you need to be skilled to earn a living wage? 7th Sep 17 at 5:35 PM
    It seems all ordinary jobs these days are minimum wage, or very close to it. So to earn £10 or more per hour, do you have to be highly skilled? Even some skilled jobs such as care workers often fall below a living rate.
    Sometimes my advice may not be great, but I'm not perfect and I do try my best. Please take this into account.
Page 1
    • pinkshoes
    • By pinkshoes 7th Sep 17, 5:53 PM
    • 15,341 Posts
    • 20,904 Thanks
    pinkshoes
    • #2
    • 7th Sep 17, 5:53 PM
    • #2
    • 7th Sep 17, 5:53 PM
    Surely it just depends on what career path you chose and how long you have been following that path?

    My DH has worked his way up from apprentice to a senior engineer.

    Care work isn't the best paid, but those running a care business make a fair amount! Same for cleaners...
    Should've = Should HAVE (not 'of')
    Would've = Would HAVE (not 'of')

    No, I am not perfect, but yes I do judge people on their use of basic English language. If you didn't know the above, then learn it! (If English is your second language, then you are forgiven!)
    • IAmWales
    • By IAmWales 7th Sep 17, 6:03 PM
    • 1,689 Posts
    • 3,483 Thanks
    IAmWales
    • #3
    • 7th Sep 17, 6:03 PM
    • #3
    • 7th Sep 17, 6:03 PM

    Care work isn't the best paid, but those running a care business make a fair amount! Same for cleaners...
    Originally posted by pinkshoes
    BUPA and the large chains yes, small agencies and care homes definitely not.

    Care workers at a junior level are not skilled in a professional sense. They can take qualifications to help with progression.

    What do you class as ordinary jobs OP? Why are the non-ordinary jobs not available to you? Perhaps you could look at some training to open up opportunities to you.

    Looks like an ongoing issue for OP. What have you done to help yourself since you first posted?
    Last edited by IAmWales; 07-09-2017 at 6:06 PM.
    • bugslet
    • By bugslet 7th Sep 17, 6:33 PM
    • 5,694 Posts
    • 27,979 Thanks
    bugslet
    • #4
    • 7th Sep 17, 6:33 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Sep 17, 6:33 PM
    I suspect I have answered this before, but....

    Class 1 HGV driver, provided you aren't totally unable you should get a license <6 weeks at a cost of around 3k. You may be able to get funding under the trailblazer programme.

    You are probably going to have to take the poorer jobs for the first year. But after that and depending where you are, you should get £10.00+. In Herts, mine are on £12.00 per hour and that's pretty standard. Work varies, fridge work, containers, machinery, out all week, home every night. Mine are on Euro work, though not abroad every week and top 40k.
    • RichardD1970
    • By RichardD1970 7th Sep 17, 6:53 PM
    • 2,679 Posts
    • 3,928 Thanks
    RichardD1970
    • #5
    • 7th Sep 17, 6:53 PM
    • #5
    • 7th Sep 17, 6:53 PM
    Nope, unskilled factory worker £17.15 per hour + shift allowance.

    One of the lucky ones I know, but it is possible.
    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 7th Sep 17, 7:12 PM
    • 1,076 Posts
    • 1,187 Thanks
    NeilCr
    • #6
    • 7th Sep 17, 7:12 PM
    • #6
    • 7th Sep 17, 7:12 PM
    My partner's son is a bus driver down here in deepest, darkest Kent and gets £10 per hour. They always have vacancies
    • TyreLever
    • By TyreLever 7th Sep 17, 7:20 PM
    • 145 Posts
    • 53 Thanks
    TyreLever
    • #7
    • 7th Sep 17, 7:20 PM
    • #7
    • 7th Sep 17, 7:20 PM
    BUPA and the large chains yes, small agencies and care homes definitely not.

    Care workers at a junior level are not skilled in a professional sense. They can take qualifications to help with progression.

    What do you class as ordinary jobs OP? Why are the non-ordinary jobs not available to you? Perhaps you could look at some training to open up opportunities to you.

    Looks like an ongoing issue for OP. What have you done to help yourself since you first posted?
    Originally posted by IAmWales
    What do you class as ordinary jobs OP? Shelf stacking, general labouring, cleaners and general warehouse duties such as counting stock, picking or packing.

    Why are the non-ordinary jobs not available to you? Skilled jobs such as electricians and computer repair specialists are not available to me because I am unable to do them.


    Perhaps you could look at some training to open up opportunities to you. I would be willing to train, but local college courses are inadequate (I have tried a couple of part time ones). Employers don't train people up from scratch themselves. Apprenticeships are notoriously bad in general. I'd love to learn a skill (for personal reasons as much as anything else), but to learn a skilled trade properly, you will need an employer to take you on and give you the experience beyond getting qualified. I think this is the major barrier. You get qualified and then your stuck.

    I'm on about £16k per year after tax right now so I'm happy enough for now. But don't know if that's gonna be adequate for living on my own. And I only earn that because I work nights and weekends, I would be earning less otherwise.

    There are plenty of skilled people around, always see BT men rewiring stuff, builders redoing roofs etc. Have no idea how people obtain such skills tho. Like I said, once you get qualified, you are still at the mercy of an employer taking you on and giving you the experience necessary to become an expert.
    Sometimes my advice may not be great, but I'm not perfect and I do try my best. Please take this into account.
    • RichardD1970
    • By RichardD1970 7th Sep 17, 7:33 PM
    • 2,679 Posts
    • 3,928 Thanks
    RichardD1970
    • #8
    • 7th Sep 17, 7:33 PM
    • #8
    • 7th Sep 17, 7:33 PM
    What do you class as ordinary jobs OP? Shelf stacking, general labouring, cleaners and general warehouse duties such as counting stock, picking or packing.

    Why are the non-ordinary jobs not available to you? Skilled jobs such as electricians and computer repair specialists are not available to me because I am unable to do them.


    Perhaps you could look at some training to open up opportunities to you. I would be willing to train, but local college courses are inadequate (I have tried a couple of part time ones). Employers don't train people up from scratch themselves. Apprenticeships are notoriously bad in general. I'd love to learn a skill (for personal reasons as much as anything else), but to learn a skilled trade properly, you will need an employer to take you on and give you the experience beyond getting qualified. I think this is the major barrier. You get qualified and then your stuck.

    I'm on about £16k per year after tax right now so I'm happy enough for now. But don't know if that's gonna be adequate for living on my own. And I only earn that because I work nights and weekends, I would be earning less otherwise.

    There are plenty of skilled people around, always see BT men rewiring stuff, builders redoing roofs etc. Have no idea how people obtain such skills tho. Like I said, once you get qualified, you are still at the mercy of an employer taking you on and giving you the experience necessary to become an expert.
    Originally posted by TyreLever
    College, night classes, the OU.

    My wife's cousins husband worked on the railways, long hours, shifts etc. He wanted to better himself so enrolled in the OU, got a few qualifications and started to move up the ladder. Got some more qualifications at evening school and the OU again.

    He is now some sort of consultant, set up with his mate and charges £500 per hour.

    Not easy and a lot of sacrifices but again, it is possible with the right mindset.

    He's not exceptionally clever or anything just very driven.
    • keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    • By keepcalmandstayoutofdebt 7th Sep 17, 8:06 PM
    • 2,918 Posts
    • 1,513 Thanks
    keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    • #9
    • 7th Sep 17, 8:06 PM
    • #9
    • 7th Sep 17, 8:06 PM
    Definately 'Right time, right place' is my thought or 'compensation' money.

    20k job requiring a 48 hour start - I am pretty sure an secure employed person would never have been able to comfortably work notice as the role commencement couldn't wait.

    Compensation/Danger money
    Thrown in deep end/immediately put to work.
    Danger that your CV/background is never understood. (I'd had to find the job description before attending interview which was just jargon and wish there had been some sort of testing in reality)
    Compo for working weekends.
    Compo for working bank hols inc Christmas Day.
    The job comes with an end date so no guarantees.

    I'm not complaining but there is a reason why the money is so good and why someone who is not a natural maybe be kept on, in place of someone who can't afford to take the risk (eg. their stable £7.50 job see's them work set pattern they would prefer).

    I know it's cheese but "Your smile is your logo, your attitude is your business card and you can make the rest up"!
    "If you are caught in a rainstorm, once you accept that you'll receive a soaking, the only thing left to do is enjoy the walk"
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 7th Sep 17, 8:12 PM
    • 4,063 Posts
    • 6,594 Thanks
    sangie595
    You have no drive! You are happy enough where you are. Nobody progresses when they are "happy enough". You have lots of reasons why you can't progress. Nobody who really wants to get qualifications is unable to do so. Stop making excuses about why it is the fault of everything and everyone else that you don't do better. You want it? Go get it. And accept that means sacrifices. If you don't want it that bad, then accept where you are.
    • Gavin83
    • By Gavin83 7th Sep 17, 8:55 PM
    • 4,679 Posts
    • 7,452 Thanks
    Gavin83
    It seems all ordinary jobs these days are minimum wage, or very close to it. So to earn £10 or more per hour, do you have to be highly skilled? Even some skilled jobs such as care workers often fall below a living rate.
    Originally posted by TyreLever
    That's the negative of increasing the minimum wage, jobs that shouldn't really be minimum wage suddenly are. I don't consider care work as a skilled job.

    Unskilled jobs will nearly always be poorly paid. If people want to be paid well they need to develop a skill. Of course pay is more complicated than that, good pay roughly equates to the number of people able to do the job and the value to the business.
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 7th Sep 17, 9:26 PM
    • 4,063 Posts
    • 6,594 Thanks
    sangie595
    I don't consider care work as a skilled job.
    .
    Originally posted by Gavin83
    You obviously haven't ever done it then! Just because caring for other people is a low value occupation in our society does not make it unskilled.
    • ThemeOne
    • By ThemeOne 7th Sep 17, 10:04 PM
    • 1,118 Posts
    • 927 Thanks
    ThemeOne
    The short answer is yes you do have to be skilled at something, even if it's only sucking up to the bosses or bigging yourself up. I've seen those two skills alone take people far.

    I've also observed that you can be as skilled as you like and attend numerous courses, but if people don't like you, you may still not get very far.
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