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  • FIRST POST
    • MSE Callum
    • By MSE Callum 7th Sep 17, 4:59 PM
    • 71Posts
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    MSE Callum
    MSE News: Energy users are put off switching because they haven't heard of the...
    • #1
    • 7th Sep 17, 4:59 PM
    MSE News: Energy users are put off switching because they haven't heard of the... 7th Sep 17 at 4:59 PM
    Not knowing whether the cheapest energy firms are "any good" is the most common reason householders are reluctant to switch energy, according to a poll of 3,500 MoneySavers....
    Read the full story:
    'Energy users are put off switching because they haven't heard of the cheapest firms, MSE poll finds'

    Click reply below to discuss. If you haven’t already, join the forum to reply.
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    • Hengus
    • By Hengus 8th Sep 17, 6:53 PM
    • 4,555 Posts
    • 2,721 Thanks
    Hengus
    With great respect to you, that's too simplistic a view. GB Energy went bust I believe, because of a spike in wholesale prices. Yes, Co-op Energy were appointed by OFGEM to take on GB Energy's customers, but I suspect it still left an awful lot of GB Energy's customers feeling downright miffed at the whole saga.

    You may not agree with my own viewpoint, but I'm not going to shift away from Npower because quite frankly, I feel safe and comfortable with their service and billing as things currently stand. I don't feel as though I'm in any way being ripped off, I'm paying less for my energy than many people. I just don't want to move to an energy company I know practically nothing about, with possibly little customer feedback, perhaps tied to poor billing or poor customer service and maybe with no support even for Smart Meters if I had them? Why would I want to put myself in that position just to save a few quid a year? That's my risk aversion sorted!

    The following link is an interesting view:

    https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/jul/02/co-op-energy-chief-david-bird-more-small-suppliers-could-go-bust
    Originally posted by Caddyman
    I am not questioning your decision, I am questioning the underpinning logic behind it. Why would GBEnergy’s customers be ‘miffed’ (and I was one of them) when the Supplier of Last Resort (Coop Energy) took over the supply to customers, with no supply break, and on the same fixed tariff terms. Customers had to do nothing but allow their monthly DD payment to go through. When the tariff term ended, the standard 49/42 day notice was given and all credit was refunded if the supplier was changed.

    By way of comparison, if my broadband/phone supplier is forced into insolvency as I am typing this ( the day after my monthly payment was taken), then I will lose my broadband and phone service for at least 12 days and any credit owed to me will be added to the long list of unsecured creditors. I will also have to enter into a new minimum term contract with another telephone/broadband supplier.

    https://www.choose.co.uk/news/186k-fast-firenet-collapse.html

    ‘Big’ does not necessarily mean financially secure. Have a look at the link below re NPower’s financial situation:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2017/08/11/loss-making-npower-warns-against-meddling-energy-market/

    Under UK contract law, the parent company (UK or foreign) is not normally liable for the debts of one of its subsidiaries.
    Last edited by Hengus; 08-09-2017 at 7:00 PM. Reason: Link
    • Caddyman
    • By Caddyman 8th Sep 17, 8:27 PM
    • 265 Posts
    • 156 Thanks
    Caddyman
    I am not questioning your decision, I am questioning the underpinning logic behind it. Why would GBEnergy’s customers be ‘miffed’ (and I was one of them) when the Supplier of Last Resort (Coop Energy) took over the supply to customers, with no supply break, and on the same fixed tariff terms. Customers had to do nothing but allow their monthly DD payment to go through. When the tariff term ended, the standard 49/42 day notice was given and all credit was refunded if the supplier was changed.

    By way of comparison, if my broadband/phone supplier is forced into insolvency as I am typing this ( the day after my monthly payment was taken), then I will lose my broadband and phone service for at least 12 days and any credit owed to me will be added to the long list of unsecured creditors. I will also have to enter into a new minimum term contract with another telephone/broadband supplier.

    https://www.choose.co.uk/news/186k-fast-firenet-collapse.html

    ‘Big’ does not necessarily mean financially secure. Have a look at the link below re NPower’s financial situation:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2017/08/11/loss-making-npower-warns-against-meddling-energy-market/

    Under UK contract law, the parent company (UK or foreign) is not normally liable for the debts of one of its subsidiaries.
    Originally posted by Hengus
    With respect, just because you weren't 'miffed' at GB Energy's collapse, please don't assume that everyone has the same attitude you clearly have. I would have been miffed personally, even though there is a 'safety net' in place. At the end of the day, you had zero control about who took your account. The 'safety net' quite literally forced it upon you. Agreed, you lost nothing, but your supplier shouldn't have gone bust in the first place.

    Also, I fail to understand why you keep referring to the non existent arrangements regarding the collapse of other utilities such as broadband? You've mentioned it in other threads on the same subject. In my view, those arguments are irrelevant to this context. Honestly? I couldn't care less whether or not my broadband has in place the same 'saftey net' as the energy industry. We're not talking about their lack of protection, we're discussing the reasons why people aren't necessarily keen to switch to energy companies they've hardly heard of. I'm one of those people. You may find my attitude illogical and without substance, but that's the way I think.

    As for Npower's current issues highlighted in your link, I was already aware, it's not exactly a secret, but it isn't going to make me switch away anytime soon. I personally wasn't affected by their 'calamitous' IT roll out in 2013. Not a single issue with billing in that respect. Obviously I feel sorry for those who were. As for Npower selling energy at a loss because of stiff competition from new start companies, well my heart bleeds for Npower, especially when I'm on a stupidly low tariff they offered up for two years in June last year. Tough on them!

    As for the small independent energy providers, it's interesting to read in the Guardian link that I provided, what the CEO of Co-op Energy said, 'that some small suppliers had told him they did not want to grow beyond 250,000 customers because, if they did, the obligations mean they would no longer be able to compete on price'. You should therefore be thanking 'illogical' folk like me for helping to ward off that possibility.

    I've no desire to enter into a 'tit for tat' with you. We have differing opinions. You've made the leap into the independent energy supplier pit, I'm just not joining you. I wish you luck with whomever you choose to take your energy from.
    • Hengus
    • By Hengus 9th Sep 17, 6:55 AM
    • 4,555 Posts
    • 2,721 Thanks
    Hengus
    With respect, just because you weren't 'miffed' at GB Energy's collapse, please don't assume that everyone has the same attitude you clearly have. I would have been miffed personally, even though there is a 'safety net' in place. At the end of the day, you had zero control about who took your account. The 'safety net' quite literally forced it upon you. Agreed, you lost nothing, but your supplier shouldn't have gone bust in the first place.

    Also, I fail to understand why you keep referring to the non existent arrangements regarding the collapse of other utilities such as broadband? You've mentioned it in other threads on the same subject. In my view, those arguments are irrelevant to this context. Honestly? I couldn't care less whether or not my broadband has in place the same 'saftey net' as the energy industry. We're not talking about their lack of protection, we're discussing the reasons why people aren't necessarily keen to switch to energy companies they've hardly heard of. I'm one of those people. You may find my attitude illogical and without substance, but that's the way I think.

    As for Npower's current issues highlighted in your link, I was already aware, it's not exactly a secret, but it isn't going to make me switch away anytime soon. I personally wasn't affected by their 'calamitous' IT roll out in 2013. Not a single issue with billing in that respect. Obviously I feel sorry for those who were. As for Npower selling energy at a loss because of stiff competition from new start companies, well my heart bleeds for Npower, especially when I'm on a stupidly low tariff they offered up for two years in June last year. Tough on them!

    As for the small independent energy providers, it's interesting to read in the Guardian link that I provided, what the CEO of Co-op Energy said, 'that some small suppliers had told him they did not want to grow beyond 250,000 customers because, if they did, the obligations mean they would no longer be able to compete on price'. You should therefore be thanking 'illogical' folk like me for helping to ward off that possibility.

    I've no desire to enter into a 'tit for tat' with you. We have differing opinions. You've made the leap into the independent energy supplier pit, I'm just not joining you. I wish you luck with whomever you choose to take your energy from.
    Originally posted by Caddyman
    This is not a ‘tit for tat’: it is a balanced discussion, I hope, about the misconceptions that are putting people off choosing small/newer suppliers. All I am pointing out is that whilst the choice of supplier is of course an individual one, the risks associated with moving to a smaller supplier are misunderstood by many. Many people still believe that if their supplier goes bust they will be left with no supply, and no credit protection. This is why people in the round are reluctant to switch imho.
    • fredandwilma
    • By fredandwilma 9th Sep 17, 7:53 AM
    • 1,069 Posts
    • 1,425 Thanks
    fredandwilma
    I am not disagreeing. Ofgem itself has said that it awards Supply Licences on the basis of a completed application form and a £450 licence fee but in doing so it is not giving any guarantees that the Licence Holder is ‘a fit and proper person to run a company’. My point is that the level of protection now offered to domestic energy customers far outweighs the protection that you and I have for such things as insurance, broadband and mobile phone contracts. If any of these businesses go into liquidation then we are on our own. No credit protection plus the need to take out a new contract with A N Other. With energy, the insolvency process is seamless. Ofgem appoints a supplier of last resort and even the DD mandate does not have to be re-written.

    So what are the actual risks? Put simply, bad billing and poor customer service. I, and others, had issues with Iresa’s incorrect use of calorific values and this led to a complaint to The Energy Ombudsman (at a cost of £460 to the supplier).

    I do have an ongoing concern about Powershop which Ofgem has been considering now for over 2 months. If I don’t get an answer shortly, then I will just switch away. The only thing that keeps me with them is their excellent customer service. That said, like many new companies, it is worth looking to see whether there is more to them than just a man with a laptop. Powershop is a well established NZ/AU energy supplier.
    Originally posted by Hengus
    This is not a ‘tit for tat’: it is a balanced discussion, I hope, about the misconceptions that are putting people off choosing small/newer suppliers. All I am pointing out is that whilst the choice of supplier is of course an individual one, the risks associated with moving to a smaller supplier are misunderstood by many. Many people still believe that if their supplier goes bust they will be left with no supply, and no credit protection. This is why people in the round are reluctant to switch imho.
    Originally posted by Hengus
    Interesting err, discussion.

    I know you are not disagreeing. I know we have different approaches to energy, probably for personal circumstances.

    Just to say, I don't 'have a go' at anyone in particular. Life is too short. I accept everyone has opposing views, although i have to admit, I sometimes don't understand the logic of someone who is clearly educated? After all, you have chosen companies who you clearly haven't been happy with in succession - GBE, Iresa and now Powershop. Why? Purely for the cheaper tariff? Entertainment? I really don't know, but i personally just wouldn't go there in the first place. Anything I say, is purely my (opinionated) view. I play the 'energy game' in a different way to you, but that's not to say either is the right or wrong way.

    But - we all have different views and expectations and what would we do without the experiences of our resident guinea pig?

    (tongue in cheek, please don't take offence).

    I often wonder what you are like in real life, as you are someone I've grown to 'know' and respect as a name on tinternet
    Last edited by fredandwilma; 09-09-2017 at 8:14 PM.
    Fred - Where's your get up and go?

    Barney - It just got up and went.



    Carpe diem
    • buglawton
    • By buglawton 9th Sep 17, 9:57 AM
    • 7,006 Posts
    • 3,228 Thanks
    buglawton
    I don't accept the headline here. I'm a reluctant switcher and do research minor suppliers and new energy entrants - in the MSE threads. Trouble is, these minority suppliers can look even more dire than the big players. Not going to name my supplier experiences here but for example an energy supplier that's de facto unobtainable on the phone, and reply to emails either very slowly or not at all.

    We need an energy competition framework where there's a measurable service metric, audited by mystery shoppers, and where below standard companies lose their license to supply energy.
    • Caddyman
    • By Caddyman 9th Sep 17, 12:46 PM
    • 265 Posts
    • 156 Thanks
    Caddyman
    I couldn't agree more buglawton.

    Whilst I admire the efforts of Hengus to put forward a balanced viewpoint either defending, promoting or extolling the virtues of the many choices we now have in the energy sector and kindly highlighting the protections in place, the problem is, the personal experiences given relating to switching to some of these smaller suppliers, has done nothing to alay my general suspicion of some of them and has to be honest, downright put me off.

    Personally, I don't want to be switching from one energy supplier to the next, either every few months or every couple of years. Switching 3 times over what period? How much money has been saved? Why would I personally want to suffer the inconvenience of either a company going bust because it simply couldn't take the strain in the market, or hasn't got a clue about how to bill people correctly using correct calorific values, or can't be bothered to answer 'phone calls or emails, or perhaps just doesn't have the staffing back up to deal with customers?

    Some would argue, that any saving, even a tenner a year is worth switching for. Well I guess that depends entirely on your circumstances. For me, last year when I switched tariffs with Npower, and believe me, I am a regular tariff switcher with Npower, my record is 3 tariff switches with Npowr in one year, I saved an annual average of £100. I wasn't even on their SVT, I just found out about a cheaper tariff with my own supplier logging into CheapEnergyClub. Npower had made zero effort to inform me themselves and yet the tariff I switched to had been out for around 2 weeks when I contacted them. Clearly making an effort to inform me as an existing customer, perhaps isn't a good business decision. It still didn't put me off from staying with them, I got a cheaper tariff and that is all that matters.

    If more households actually made the effort to organise their energy finances, you wouldn't have so many whingers complaining about the overall cost of their energy, and I'm specifically targeting those whose downright apathy leads them to remaining on a suppliers SVT. There's many reasons for such apathy, but mostly it's just entirely related to the 'I can't be bothered attitude'. But if one is going to sustain such apathy, they certainly shouldn't whinge about it!

    I'm never saying 'never' to switching to a much smaller independent energy company, but they're going to have to up their game considerably in my view and prove over a number of years that they can weather the storm and give a level of service that I personally find acceptable. In nine months time when my current superb Npower tariff ends, I'll review my options. Any decision I take will be after serious calculated thought, not necessarily driven by the overwhelming urge to save a few quid or try out some rushed in market upstart having paid their £450 licence fee operating out of some high rise in Anytown, perhaps sacrificing a level of stability, longevity and customer service that I currently find on the whole, very good with my current supplier.
    • MothballsWallet
    • By MothballsWallet 9th Sep 17, 1:28 PM
    • 11,458 Posts
    • 15,038 Thanks
    MothballsWallet
    And we need to replace OFGEM and the Energy Ombudsman Service with a bucket of radioactive, rancid poo because that would do a better job at protecting consumers.
    Always ask yourself one question: What would Gibbs do?
    Married to an immigrant.
    Even my PC is nicknamed "GIBBS".
    • cjdavies
    • By cjdavies 9th Sep 17, 1:39 PM
    • 2,793 Posts
    • 2,795 Thanks
    cjdavies
    I'm one of them, it's like insurance, cheapest quote by a company not heard of - no thanks.
    • Hengus
    • By Hengus 9th Sep 17, 2:41 PM
    • 4,555 Posts
    • 2,721 Thanks
    Hengus
    And we need to replace OFGEM and the Energy Ombudsman Service with a bucket of radioactive, rancid poo because that would do a better job at protecting consumers.
    Originally posted by MothballsWallet
    I am not sure that I would put it in quite the words that you have used, but I agree that Ofgem and The EO need to raise their games. The EO adjudication process takes far too long for the simplest of complaints. For example, if a supplier fails to respond to a complaint then why does the EO need 8 weeks to gather evidence?

    Ofgem, sadly, doesn’t like consumer contact. The Iresa CV issue was first raised by others and myself in January of this year. Ofgem is still not able to confirm that the issue has been resolved - and it is the Regulator. Separately, I asked Ofgem for advice about Powershop and whether credit protection is in place. Two months on, I have yet to get a satisfactory reply. Whilst I don’t share the reservations that those above have about using small/new suppliers, I accept that a more pro-active Ofgem would do a lot to give people greater confidence about using new suppliers. It might also encourage some of the Big 6 to improve their service standards.
    • harz99
    • By harz99 9th Sep 17, 5:23 PM
    • 2,493 Posts
    • 2,439 Thanks
    harz99
    As a matter of interest, as OVO do charge in advance for energy, how much is your first payment going to be on switching? I understand from what I've read, that the amount is based upon figures provided relating to previous billing from your old supplier? If for instance your monthly direct debit was £65 for electricity and £45 for gas, would they be asking you to stump up at least £110 before you even start? From some of the reviews I've read into this company, this is exactly what they appear to do? By all means, if one is happy to do that, then great. According to the documentation OVO have sent me, £52 per month inclusive up front.




    I'm also with Npower. Granted yours and my energy useage may be worlds apart, but I'm guessing you didn't switch to Npower's June 2018 Feel Good Fix last year? Online pricefix dual fuel August 2018 is my current tarrif.




    I have an annual energy bill of £670, which for two people in a 3 bed semi, is pretty cheap compared to lots of households. I have a new 3 storey, 3 bed terraced house which is very fuel efficient, that coupled with the periods when we escape these shores for warmer climes, means my bills are not excessive. The rational for changing was the longer fix, plus we are going to be at home more over the next two winters, so the higher standing charges will be well offset by the lower unit costs of the extra energy we use



    Originally posted by Caddyman


    Also I have lost patience with Npower over taking excessively high DDs, and then not following through with arrangements to reduce them, result being they are sitting on almost £400 of my money.
    • Consumerist
    • By Consumerist 9th Sep 17, 6:19 PM
    • 4,669 Posts
    • 2,321 Thanks
    Consumerist
    Also I have lost patience with Npower over taking excessively high DDs, and then not following through with arrangements to reduce them, result being they are sitting on almost £400 of my money.
    Originally posted by harz99
    Have you asked for a refund?

    In my view, the best time to ask for refunds is in the Spring but if your credit is excessive compared to your annual consumption you should be able to get some back even at this time of year.

    Have you asked them to justify the DD based on your consumption? If you have asked and they haven't explained then complain.

    It seems a shame to have to fork out early termination charges by changing supplier before the end of your contract.
    Warning: In the kingdom of the blind, the one-eyed man is king.
    • grumpycrab
    • By grumpycrab 9th Sep 17, 6:44 PM
    • 3,258 Posts
    • 1,481 Thanks
    grumpycrab
    I took a gamble when I switched to Iresa, because they were a relatively new company that I had never heard of before... they were a complete shambles.
    Originally posted by poppellerant
    And still are a complete shambles. Users that don't switch because they've never heard of companies like Iresa are totally vindicated.
    Hi, we’ve had to remove your signature because somebody complained that the information contained within it was too helpful.
    • Raine E Day
    • By Raine E Day 9th Sep 17, 7:01 PM
    • 780 Posts
    • 1,834 Thanks
    Raine E Day
    I have decided not to switch just yet. This the reality, once I have whittled down list to include, 1) Warm Home Discount (Core) participants, 2) those I know who will not have problem with the Economy 7 metre (never had Economy 7 since I moved here 17 years ago ) with the need to total up day and night for 'normal' rate, and 3) those who have a level of customer service that does not send alarm signals. I realise I will only save a max of £75 a year with the cheapest (and dodgiest) , ao am sticking with British Gas Standard (with a view to switching early next year perhaps). Better the devil you know.

    Mark HodgesCEO, Centrica Consumer https://www.britishgas.co.uk/media/r/1486/why_we_ve_had_to_raise_electricity_prices__but_ar
    ....But there’s another very important group that we will ensure is protected from the price increase this winter: our most vulnerable customers. For more than 200,000 standard tariff customers in the core group who automatically receive the Warm Home Discount, British Gas will credit their account with £76 over the winter months.....
    “Rain drops are not the ones who bring the clouds.”
    • harz99
    • By harz99 9th Sep 17, 7:35 PM
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    • 2,439 Thanks
    harz99
    Have you asked for a refund?

    In my view, the best time to ask for refunds is in the Spring but if your credit is excessive compared to your annual consumption you should be able to get some back even at this time of year.

    Have you asked them to justify the DD based on your consumption? If you have asked and they haven't explained then complain.

    It seems a shame to have to fork out early termination charges by changing supplier before the end of your contract.
    Originally posted by Consumerist
    Not asked for refund because they have just reduced my DD to stupidly low, and as I'm switching out I'll get it back anyway. No early exit charges on the tariff, so no cost involved.
    • Caddyman
    • By Caddyman 10th Sep 17, 9:08 AM
    • 265 Posts
    • 156 Thanks
    Caddyman
    Also I have lost patience with Npower over taking excessively high DDs, and then not following through with arrangements to reduce them, result being they are sitting on almost £400 of my money.
    Originally posted by harz99
    Thanks for taking the time to clarify the questions.

    Concerning your £400 in credit balance, I don't disbelieve you, however, I am truly baffled by your situation. I've been an Npower customer for years and I've never built up an in credit balance the like of which you have. Excessively high or low monthly direct debits can sometimes occur because of inaccurate meter readings.

    I'm clearly unsure of your meter reading regime, but if you're constantly getting estimated bills for instance and if you never question them and your D/D just keeps getting paid and then one day an actual reading is taken and it's clear you've used far less energy than what you've been paying for, from what I see, that's how one could get a substantial credit build up.

    In my own case, this never happens. Every single month, first of the month, I take gas/electric meter readings and submit them via Npower's App. Takes just about 3 minutes of my time. 12 meter read submissions a year by me, OCD? probably! but my bills are never a surprise to me, my monthly direct debit is spot on and I don't build up a hefty in credit or minus balance. On 3rd of August 2017, an official Npower meter reader pitched up, took actual readings and unsurprisingly, they were within a few kwh of my own readings I'd submitted just 48 hours previously. I received an actual bill one week later. No surprises, not in debt, no raising or lowering of my D/D, just over £5 in credit balance which will get consumed by the winter bill. Over the next two months, I won't be surprised if my monthly D/D is increased slightly to take account of my increased winter energy useage because of my OCD meter read regime. To be honest, I am hankering after smart meters, but Npower are being very slow on installations in my region. I've just had my water meter replaced with a smart meter. Saves me having to send readings or check the accuracy.

    I see from your last post, you're not asking for your in credit balance back because a. your switching, and b. you say they've reduced your D/D to 'stupidly low'. Hardly surprising really, however, I cannot fathom why they have not previously auto refunded you. Trust me, I would have been ranting on the phone at them to refund me if I had built up the in credit balance you say you have built up. There's no way they'd get to sit on that amount of my money.

    To be honest, if I'd experienced the sort of poor customer service you say you have experienced and seemingly not getting anywhere, I'd have approached the energy ombudsman by now. It doesn't cost a penny and it isn't necessarily onerous. I know, because a few years back when I was with Powergen, I had to get the ombudsman involved. My complaint was resolved within a month.

    I hope your switch goes well.
    • Caddyman
    • By Caddyman 10th Sep 17, 9:23 AM
    • 265 Posts
    • 156 Thanks
    Caddyman
    And still are a complete shambles. Users that don't switch because they've never heard of companies like Iresa are totally vindicated.
    Originally posted by grumpycrab
    I've heard of Iresa, they're actually based just a few miles away from where I live. Will I switch to them? Based on my own research, no. That's a personal decsion and not in any way intended to sway others opinions. One should always carry out their own research prior to switching.

    As I've stated in an earlier post or thread, at this juncture, if I were to consider switching away from my 'Big 6' supplier, my first port of call, would probably, most likely be one of the large City Council suppliers, such as Robin Hood Energy, or Bristol Energy, which though not the cheapest, are still reasonably competitive. It all depends on where you live though as regionally, prices can and do vary.
    • Consumerist
    • By Consumerist 10th Sep 17, 1:31 PM
    • 4,669 Posts
    • 2,321 Thanks
    Consumerist
    . . . Every single month, first of the month, I take gas/electric meter readings and submit them via Npower's App. Takes just about 3 minutes of my time. 12 meter read submissions a year by me, OCD? probably! . . .
    Originally posted by Caddyman
    Good sense, if you ask me. If only more people would do something similar I am sure there would be far fewer energy complaints.

    That is not to say, however, that suppliers, in general, are not falling well short of a professional standard of service.
    Warning: In the kingdom of the blind, the one-eyed man is king.
    • harz99
    • By harz99 10th Sep 17, 1:39 PM
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    harz99
    Caddyman, as regards the auto refund, my suspicion is they won't do that until you've been with them at least a year so they know your peaks and troughs of usage, which I've only just passed.


    I'm not as good with readings as you, smart meters are BG ones so useless, and Gas means getting down on the ground to read it, which I find difficult. Only every 2 months I do mine.


    Npower has never worked well at this house, however at a previous property over 10 years back all was well. Often though, with all these big power suppliers, it's their computer systems or rubbish CS reps (or both) that cause the problems so many people have.


    I would agree about the phone rant re credit and complaining if interest rates weren't in the doldrums, but at around 1% it isn't worth the aggro to me as I'm maxed out on all the higher rates available from current a/c's, regsvr's etc. Situation would have largely resolved by next review date anyway.
    • harz99
    • By harz99 10th Sep 17, 1:49 PM
    • 2,493 Posts
    • 2,439 Thanks
    harz99

    Concerning your £400 in credit balance, I don't disbelieve you, however, I am truly baffled by your situation. I've been an Npower customer for years and I've never built up an in credit balance the like of which you have. Excessively high or low monthly direct debits can sometimes occur because of inaccurate meter readings.


    I hope your switch goes well.
    Originally posted by Caddyman

    Trust me, when I switched to Npower I knew the DD they proposed was far to high, after 3 months I rang up, went through it all with a CS rep and agreed a lower DD which would have still ended up with a credit balance of around £150 to go into the next heavy usage winter period - I went abroad for nearly 3 months, they never implemented the reduced DD so that was that.


    Thanks for the good switch vibes.
    • Caddyman
    • By Caddyman 10th Sep 17, 2:04 PM
    • 265 Posts
    • 156 Thanks
    Caddyman
    Trust me, when I switched to Npower I knew the DD they proposed was far to high, after 3 months I rang up, went through it all with a CS rep and agreed a lower DD which would have still ended up with a credit balance of around £150 to go into the next heavy usage winter period - I went abroad for nearly 3 months, they never implemented the reduced DD so that was that.


    Thanks for the good switch vibes.
    Originally posted by harz99
    No problem. I don't have a problem with switchers or switching, I've done it myself in the past, albeit quite a few years ago now! But obviously this thread is all about the fears folks have about switching to small independent energy suppliers and the merits or otherwise of doing so. I've carried out my own risk analysis and for me, I'm not ready to go down that particular road and that's an entirely personal decision.

    I wasn't aware of the issue relating to time spent with an energy company assessing your useage in your first year as a customer, so thanks for enlightening me. This might be the reason why a very good friend of mine is currently in fuel poverty to the tune of over £300 and is currently forking out a rather large monthly D/D payment to reduce the debt. She moved into a property just over 12 months ago and rather oddly, never sent a single meter reading in, (she didn't think she had to.... ) just went by the estimated bills and EON, her provider didn't read the meter until only a few weeks ago. They rather rapidly installed smart meters!

    As I say, good luck with the switch. Hope it all works out well!
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