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  • FIRST POST
    • samuelj77
    • By samuelj77 7th Sep 17, 4:17 PM
    • 3Posts
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    samuelj77
    deprivation of capital question
    • #1
    • 7th Sep 17, 4:17 PM
    deprivation of capital question 7th Sep 17 at 4:17 PM
    If someone has £30,000 is on contributed esa and pays full rent, council tax but has a condition like this:
    Hypogonadism means diminished functional activity of the gonads—the testes in males or the ovaries in females—that may result in diminished sex hormone biosynthesis. In layman's terms, it is sometimes called interrupted stage 1 puberty. Low androgen (e.g., testosterone) levels are referred to as hypoandrogenism and low estrogen (e.g., estradiol) as hypoestrogenism, and may occur as symptoms of hypogonadism in both sexes, but are generally only diagnosed in males and females respectively. Other hormones produced by the gonads that hypogonadism can decrease include progesterone, DHEA, anti-Müllerian hormone, activin, and inhibin. Spermatogenesis in males, and ovulation in females, may be impaired by hypogonadism, which, depending on the degree of severity, may result in partial or complete infertility.
    And dr's wont help so he decides to self treat, buy 5 years worth of hormone replacement + paying for regular blood tests, would it be classed as deprivation of capital of capital even though he'll provide the reciepts, e-mails, bank statements?

    Obviously if they start feeling better they will look for work and notify the dwp that they're well enough to work because they're self treating hormone replacement after no help from the nhs?
Page 1
    • Torry Quine
    • By Torry Quine 7th Sep 17, 4:24 PM
    • 16,949 Posts
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    Torry Quine
    • #2
    • 7th Sep 17, 4:24 PM
    • #2
    • 7th Sep 17, 4:24 PM
    If they are receiving contributions based ESA then it is irrelevant what money they have or how they spend it. Do remember though that unless in the support group contributions based is restricted to one year after which they could only get income based
    Life is like riding a bicycle, to keep your balance you must keep moving . Albert Einstein.

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    • samuelj77
    • By samuelj77 7th Sep 17, 5:19 PM
    • 3 Posts
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    samuelj77
    • #3
    • 7th Sep 17, 5:19 PM
    • #3
    • 7th Sep 17, 5:19 PM
    Thanks. They're in the support group but just a bit worried if the money drops below £16,000 that they'd be entitled to housing benefit. At the moment they're paying full rent on a private property which isn't cheap.
    • IAmWales
    • By IAmWales 7th Sep 17, 6:25 PM
    • 1,223 Posts
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    IAmWales
    • #4
    • 7th Sep 17, 6:25 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Sep 17, 6:25 PM
    Have you escalated the lack of treatment issue, have you been referred to a specialist?
    • samuelj77
    • By samuelj77 7th Sep 17, 6:46 PM
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    samuelj77
    • #5
    • 7th Sep 17, 6:46 PM
    • #5
    • 7th Sep 17, 6:46 PM
    Yes, I've seen 4 endocrinologists. None want to help. It's actually quite common for them not to want to help anyone under 50. I'm 37.

    I've also complained by phone and e-mail.
    • Topcat1982
    • By Topcat1982 7th Sep 17, 7:06 PM
    • 345 Posts
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    Topcat1982
    • #6
    • 7th Sep 17, 7:06 PM
    • #6
    • 7th Sep 17, 7:06 PM
    If it was a private operation it's not usually considered DOC but I'm not sure about 'self treating'.

    I think you'll have to write and ask.
    • Xbigman
    • By Xbigman 8th Sep 17, 7:20 AM
    • 2,912 Posts
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    Xbigman
    • #7
    • 8th Sep 17, 7:20 AM
    • #7
    • 8th Sep 17, 7:20 AM
    Buying 5 years worth of medication is a non starter. 6 months is realistically the most you might buy in one go without it being questioned. You might get away with more if the pack size is particularly large but buying huge amounts of meds and just happening to qualify for means tested benefits is asking for trouble.

    Its also worth looking at the use by dates because 5 years is an awful long time in medicine terms.



    Darren
    Xbigman's guide to a happy life.

    Eat properly
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    • xylophone
    • By xylophone 8th Sep 17, 9:35 AM
    • 22,881 Posts
    • 13,236 Thanks
    xylophone
    • #8
    • 8th Sep 17, 9:35 AM
    • #8
    • 8th Sep 17, 9:35 AM
    It's actually quite common for them not to want to help anyone under 50.
    Fo a condition that may lead to infertility?
    • phillw
    • By phillw 8th Sep 17, 10:22 AM
    • 808 Posts
    • 400 Thanks
    phillw
    • #9
    • 8th Sep 17, 10:22 AM
    • #9
    • 8th Sep 17, 10:22 AM
    Thanks. They're in the support group but just a bit worried if the money drops below £16,000 that they'd be entitled to housing benefit. At the moment they're paying full rent on a private property which isn't cheap.
    Originally posted by samuelj77
    If they are worried that they would be entitled, then they shouldn't pay for 5 years in advance & then claim housing benefit. If they are hoping they are entitled after spending the money, then that is the definition of deprivation.

    If you are asking whether there is a way of getting away with it, then I expect they have heard every excuse under the sun. They don't even let you clear your existing debts early.

    The DWP don't take pity on people that the NHS fails.

    Have you tried talking to PALS? http://www.nhs.uk/chq/pages/1082.aspx?categoryid=68&subcategoryid=153
    Last edited by phillw; 08-09-2017 at 10:27 AM.
    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 8th Sep 17, 3:23 PM
    • 8,221 Posts
    • 4,891 Thanks
    teddysmum
    Is it not dangerous to medicate long term, with no medical supervision ? All levels which are treated by various drugs, I take, have to be checked once a year, at the very least.
    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 8th Sep 17, 3:30 PM
    • 8,221 Posts
    • 4,891 Thanks
    teddysmum
    Thanks. They're in the support group but just a bit worried if the money drops below £16,000 that they'd be entitled to housing benefit. At the moment they're paying full rent on a private property which isn't cheap.
    Originally posted by samuelj77


    If entitled to housing benefit ,it will only be paid to the level your household is seen to need.


    eg a single person will not get an expensive 4 bedroomed house's rent covered, as they are only eligible for one bedroom.
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