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  • FIRST POST
    • madlyn
    • By madlyn 7th Sep 17, 10:02 AM
    • 534Posts
    • 84Thanks
    madlyn
    soup maker
    • #1
    • 7th Sep 17, 10:02 AM
    soup maker 7th Sep 17 at 10:02 AM
    I like to take soup to work for my lunch, but as tinned soup may not be the best, I'm considering making my own.
    So is it worth investing in a soup maker to do it all for me or is a saucepan and a stick blender just as good?
Page 1
    • trailingspouse
    • By trailingspouse 7th Sep 17, 10:17 AM
    • 2,212 Posts
    • 3,089 Thanks
    trailingspouse
    • #2
    • 7th Sep 17, 10:17 AM
    • #2
    • 7th Sep 17, 10:17 AM
    'Do it all?'

    What's to do? You stick all your ingredients in a big pan and boil them for however long. You can use a stick blender if you want, but you don't even have to do that, just have it chunky.

    Why has making soup suddenly become so difficult?

    And have you seen the price of soup makers???
    • Ilona
    • By Ilona 7th Sep 17, 10:26 AM
    • 1,875 Posts
    • 6,439 Thanks
    Ilona
    • #3
    • 7th Sep 17, 10:26 AM
    • #3
    • 7th Sep 17, 10:26 AM
    As above. Making soup is not rocket science. Chuck stuff in a pan, simmer till cooked. No recipe's needed, use whatever you have. Leave it chunky if you prefer, or whiz with stick blender if you like it smooth. Don't buy another gadget to stick at the back of the cupboard until you donate it to charity in ten years time.

    Ilona
    I love skip diving
    • bouicca21
    • By bouicca21 7th Sep 17, 10:59 AM
    • 3,109 Posts
    • 3,840 Thanks
    bouicca21
    • #4
    • 7th Sep 17, 10:59 AM
    • #4
    • 7th Sep 17, 10:59 AM
    I love my soup maker. It makes soup in 21 minutes and blends so well that I don't need to take the skin off the tomatoes ...

    DD scoffed and said 'it's just a big kettle with built in blender'. Then went out and bought one for herself.
    • culpepper
    • By culpepper 7th Sep 17, 12:02 PM
    • 3,850 Posts
    • 6,975 Thanks
    culpepper
    • #5
    • 7th Sep 17, 12:02 PM
    • #5
    • 7th Sep 17, 12:02 PM
    Hubs has one specially for work. He takes in veg (they have a fridge) and makes himself soup most days. We have one at home too that gets used weekends or if I am on an exercise drive I will stick it all in, go and do my workout/run and then back just as it finishes.
    You do have the cleaning up but it isn't bad if you immediately fill with water and a drop of washing up liq and give it a quick zap and let it soak while you eat your soup..
    • Ginmonster
    • By Ginmonster 7th Sep 17, 12:26 PM
    • 268 Posts
    • 2,755 Thanks
    Ginmonster
    • #6
    • 7th Sep 17, 12:26 PM
    • #6
    • 7th Sep 17, 12:26 PM
    I'd start with the saucepan and stick blender if I were you. A stick blender can be got pretty cheaply and if you get one with a few different attachments you can use it for lots of different things. I've never seen or used a soup maker but I'm guessing they're more expensive and bulkier so I'd want to be sure it was worth the extra cash and space.

    I make soup all the time and it is something you can just bung in a saucepan and leave to bubble away for a while so it's pretty low maintenance. There are plenty of recipes online if your want some inspiration but I tend to fry a bit onion and garlic, add any chopped veg I feel like, add stock, maybe add a handful or two of red lentils or a tin of some kind of beans, or some pearl barley, simmer until everything's cooked through. Blend ( or not). Eat.

    You can add a few spoons of chutney, a handful of pasta shapes, leftover roast potatoes, pesto, chilli sauce, herbs, spices, etc, etc. It's the perfect use-up food!
    Last edited by Ginmonster; 07-09-2017 at 12:31 PM.
    • LameWolf
    • By LameWolf 7th Sep 17, 12:32 PM
    • 9,687 Posts
    • 104,513 Thanks
    LameWolf
    • #7
    • 7th Sep 17, 12:32 PM
    • #7
    • 7th Sep 17, 12:32 PM
    I just use a saucepan, and wuzz the resulting soup in the food processor before serving. I haven't the space for yet another gadget.
    Oh, and I don't bother skinning tomatoes - they seem to blend in just fine.
    LameWolf
    If your dog thinks you're the best, don't seek a second opinion.
    • elf06
    • By elf06 7th Sep 17, 1:57 PM
    • 1,548 Posts
    • 15,128 Thanks
    elf06
    • #8
    • 7th Sep 17, 1:57 PM
    • #8
    • 7th Sep 17, 1:57 PM
    I use my slow cooker to make soup! I don't think I could justify the cost of a soup maker - it would be another gadget to store and I have limited space. I'd much rather use a stock pot and stick blender or my SC
    Emma

    Aug GC - £88.17/£130
    NSD - target 18 days, so far 5!!
    • JackieO
    • By JackieO 7th Sep 17, 3:05 PM
    • 15,255 Posts
    • 123,959 Thanks
    JackieO
    • #9
    • 7th Sep 17, 3:05 PM
    • #9
    • 7th Sep 17, 3:05 PM
    I am a prolific soup maker and have soup daily almost,for lunch with crackers and cheese or as a starter in the evening before dinner.My late Mum used to make vats of the stuff when I was little and we either had soup before dinner in the evening, or a pudding,never had both.

    She said that a soup starter helped fill up your tummy and therefore cut back on large dinners (she was a canny wee Scots lady who could streetch a shilling to do the work of ten )

    Personally I wouldn't bother ,if you have not made it before it really is very easy to make and for around a fiver if you wanted to you can buy a stick blender to make it smoother. But I agree not much point buying a bigger bulkier gadget that may get stuck at the back of the cupboard. Stick blenders are easy enough to use .I have a jug blender attachment that goes on my Kenwood mixer which I had as an extra when I bought it several years ago. even a jug blender only costs about £15-20 and is useful for other things
    Quot Libros,Quam Breve Tempus.
    • Prinzessilein
    • By Prinzessilein 7th Sep 17, 3:22 PM
    • 1,958 Posts
    • 9,070 Thanks
    Prinzessilein
    Slowcooker for me...and a stick blender of I feel like having a smoother soup....generally I like a chunky soup.

    There is nothing quite as satisfying as a bowl of warm, homemade, soup on a cold autumnal (or winter) evening....(maybe with a slice of homebaked bread...slathered with homemade joghurt cheese?)

    I keep a container filled with soup-mix on the shelf...dried pulses, grains and sometimes pasta......and I always have a tub of Swiss Marigold Bouillon powder too...then just add whatever veg is leftover ...(add a bone if I can get a nice one...pig knuckle costs pennies and transforms a pot pf peasoup!).....I do like my soup!
    • Spendless
    • By Spendless 7th Sep 17, 8:42 PM
    • 19,521 Posts
    • 31,535 Thanks
    Spendless
    If soup makers were cheaper I'd have bought one to try it. I seem to have a problem with veg/water ratios. My stick blender always seemed to have the soup too watery and the one time I tried the slow cooker instead of a pan, it was even worse. I didn't replace my stick blender when it broke for this reason, as I wasn't using it for anything else. I bought a worktop blender instead (just cheap one) and better results are got, but that's by straining a lot of the water off before blending it.
    • DianneB
    • By DianneB 7th Sep 17, 9:15 PM
    • 787 Posts
    • 1,619 Thanks
    DianneB
    I use a pressure cooker for soups, makes them in minutes, then blend with a stick blender.
    Loading........................
    • maddiemay
    • By maddiemay 7th Sep 17, 9:20 PM
    • 3,080 Posts
    • 27,041 Thanks
    maddiemay
    I managed with a pan and potato masher and then a stick blender for 50 years and then got poorly and would forget the pan was on and poor gr made using the stick difficult (soup up the walls lol). I bought a soup maker and we love it. It makes 6 portion for us, either 3days of lunches or tubs for the freezer, great when I find YS offers.

    (Should read poor grip!)
    • cliffsgirl
    • By cliffsgirl 7th Sep 17, 10:15 PM
    • 297 Posts
    • 733 Thanks
    cliffsgirl
    I've got a soup maker and it's brilliant. Put everything in choose chunky or smooth option and switch it on and forget about it till it's done. Makes lovely soup we use it all the time. When I bought it my partner scoffed saying what a waste of money, what's wrong with a saucepan but now he even admits it's one of the best things we ever bought.
    • LameWolf
    • By LameWolf 8th Sep 17, 10:33 AM
    • 9,687 Posts
    • 104,513 Thanks
    LameWolf
    I managed with a pan and potato masher and then a stick blender for 50 years and then got poorly and would forget the pan was on and poor gr made using the stick difficult (soup up the walls lol). I bought a soup maker and we love it. It makes 6 portion for us, either 3days of lunches or tubs for the freezer, great when I find YS offers.

    (Should read poor grip!)
    Originally posted by maddiemay
    That's why I use the food processor rather than the stick blender.
    LameWolf
    If your dog thinks you're the best, don't seek a second opinion.
    • AElene
    • By AElene 8th Sep 17, 10:40 AM
    • 36 Posts
    • 215 Thanks
    AElene
    I've never used a soup maker, but if you're pushed for time it sounds like a time-saving gadget, so may be useful for you?

    Soups are really easy to make in a saucepan, just fry some onions and garlic and veg/meat, then add your stock, simmer till cooked, season and blend if required.

    (I would love a food processor but the budget will only stretch to a stick blender at the moment!)
    Ælene
    • zippychick
    • By zippychick 8th Sep 17, 11:54 AM
    • 9,325 Posts
    • 17,736 Thanks
    zippychick
    there's been lots of discussion in this older thread too.

    let us know what you decide!

    Zip
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    • purpleivy
    • By purpleivy 8th Sep 17, 12:18 PM
    • 3,268 Posts
    • 20,348 Thanks
    purpleivy
    Instant pot for soup. I wouldn't mess around with a task specific piece of equipment. I also wouldn't buy a cheap immersible (stick) blender. I did that once and it melted in my mushroom soup!
    "Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad"
    Trying not to waste food!
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 8th Sep 17, 7:39 PM
    • 22,966 Posts
    • 88,580 Thanks
    Jojo the Tightfisted
    If soup makers were cheaper I'd have bought one to try it. I seem to have a problem with veg/water ratios. My stick blender always seemed to have the soup too watery and the one time I tried the slow cooker instead of a pan, it was even worse. I didn't replace my stick blender when it broke for this reason, as I wasn't using it for anything else. I bought a worktop blender instead (just cheap one) and better results are got, but that's by straining a lot of the water off before blending it.
    Originally posted by Spendless
    Use the tiniest amount of water, just covering the veggies, and just have the kettle boiled ready in case you need to add any more liquid. I don't use fat/flour to thicken anything and don't use dairy, so I normally stick a potato into the veggies to add an element of starch and a richer texture if I'm not adding pulses, pasta or grains.
    I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die: I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by.

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    Originally posted by colinw
    • Primrose
    • By Primrose 8th Sep 17, 7:56 PM
    • 7,617 Posts
    • 25,633 Thanks
    Primrose
    I'm another one who favours a large saucepan and a stick blender and I make a wide variety of soups during winter months. Our butcher often provides a bag of chicken carcasses for making stock which vastly improves the flavour and texture and I use an old fashioned pressure cooker to speed up the stock making process.
    We often eat chunky soups but the stick blender is used for making batches of soup for the freezer. I freeze these in plastic one pint milk bottles which store well in the freezer without the risk of bags bursting, and these store two generous portions. To thaw, if you don,t have a microwave, just take the plastic bottle out of the freezer and immerse in a bowl of hot water for a couple of hours.
    Have learnt the lesson that too many kitchen gadgets just take up storage space in cupboards which could be put to better use.
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