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  • FIRST POST
    • sprucegs
    • By sprucegs 6th Sep 17, 9:26 PM
    • 34Posts
    • 1Thanks
    sprucegs
    Anyone a self employed gardener?
    • #1
    • 6th Sep 17, 9:26 PM
    Anyone a self employed gardener? 6th Sep 17 at 9:26 PM
    I want to start gardening, gras cutting, hedges, weeding etc.
    Do I need a licence to get rid of the waste? I've heard different things and I'm not sure, whether it's free for a licence or not? And if it's free to tip?

    Thanks.
Page 1
    • CKhalvashi
    • By CKhalvashi 7th Sep 17, 1:42 AM
    • 8,762 Posts
    • 24,748 Thanks
    CKhalvashi
    • #2
    • 7th Sep 17, 1:42 AM
    • #2
    • 7th Sep 17, 1:42 AM
    I leave the brown bin (colour may vary) around the back for the gardener (who actually seems to spend more time on the phone and playing with her child than gardening, before getting annoyed when I've requested she finishes the job before she goes) when she comes.

    If you're transporting waste you will require the appropriate trade disposal license from your council.
    "I kada sanjamo san, nek bude hiljadu raznih boja" (L. Stamenkovic)

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    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 7th Sep 17, 7:19 AM
    • 23,526 Posts
    • 89,339 Thanks
    Davesnave
    • #3
    • 7th Sep 17, 7:19 AM
    • #3
    • 7th Sep 17, 7:19 AM
    Unless you plan to take on only small jobs, you'll need a waste carrier's licence, because your activities will make you a frequent visitor at the tip recycling centre. They will notice.

    Different councils/operators will have their own rules on green waste, so you need to enquire locally about costs etc.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • Niv
    • By Niv 7th Sep 17, 8:19 AM
    • 1,529 Posts
    • 1,335 Thanks
    Niv
    • #4
    • 7th Sep 17, 8:19 AM
    • #4
    • 7th Sep 17, 8:19 AM
    See link:


    https://www.gov.uk/waste-carrier-or-broker-registration


    Cost £154


    You will have to pay for disposal at a local transfer station / MRF / composting site. Its worth giving them a call to confirm their rates. Often there is a 1 tonne minimum charge.
    YNWA

    Target: Mortgage free by 58.
    • Niv
    • By Niv 7th Sep 17, 8:21 AM
    • 1,529 Posts
    • 1,335 Thanks
    Niv
    • #5
    • 7th Sep 17, 8:21 AM
    • #5
    • 7th Sep 17, 8:21 AM
    Also do consider if you will be needing to buy compost in bulk, the same local composting site you could be disposing of your waste is the same place you can probably buy compost in bulk, its pretty cheap if you have your own transport.
    YNWA

    Target: Mortgage free by 58.
    • sprucegs
    • By sprucegs 7th Sep 17, 9:39 AM
    • 34 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    sprucegs
    • #6
    • 7th Sep 17, 9:39 AM
    • #6
    • 7th Sep 17, 9:39 AM
    Ok thanks. So if I use the customers green waste bin I will be ok.
    • Farway
    • By Farway 7th Sep 17, 2:58 PM
    • 5,650 Posts
    • 7,377 Thanks
    Farway
    • #7
    • 7th Sep 17, 2:58 PM
    • #7
    • 7th Sep 17, 2:58 PM
    Most of the garden services I see around here specifically state they do not remove the garden waste, because of the fees involved, plus time & hassle of going to the tip of course

    Putting it in the householders garden waste bin should be fine, after all you will be doing no more than the householder would be doing if they could
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 7th Sep 17, 4:01 PM
    • 2,577 Posts
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    glasgowdan
    • #8
    • 7th Sep 17, 4:01 PM
    • #8
    • 7th Sep 17, 4:01 PM
    There's some wrong advice above.

    If you are transporting waste you create yourself as part of your job, the license is free. You are a lower tier waste carrier. You still have to register.

    If you have access to an informal composting facility to take the waste to, they won't be filling in WTNs. Chances of being stopped on the road are too small to quantify.

    AVOID taking waste to a council-run commercial waste centre. It's a fortune. Get researching places in our area. For example, within 3 miles of my home I have 3 centres... one is a farm that composts, one is an informal quarry site, one is a formal compost and eco centre. All 3 cost me £20-25 for a full load of green waste (van and trailer).

    Does your local council provide green waste wheelie bin collections for free?

    Don't be afraid to charge properly for waste removal. A liftable (i.e. you can still lift it) bulk builder's bag should be charged at £10-15 in my experience.

    Yes, you are fine to use the customer's green waste bins.
    Last edited by glasgowdan; 07-09-2017 at 4:15 PM.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 7th Sep 17, 6:55 PM
    • 23,526 Posts
    • 89,339 Thanks
    Davesnave
    • #9
    • 7th Sep 17, 6:55 PM
    • #9
    • 7th Sep 17, 6:55 PM
    Even council centres vary significantly. I've access to four within 20 miles (none locally) and in two I'm treated civilly and given a little leeway on the basic rules. In a third one I tried, the staff enforced 'the rules' without any flexibility whatever. They saw me with three short pieces of drain pipe, total length about 1m, and wanted to charge me £3.50.

    At the fourth site, I've had staff see my van in the queue and wave me past the householders in their cars, because in their eyes I'm a worker and a paying customer, so I deserve better treatment! That's also where I've done advantageous deals on the larger amounts of 'difficult' waste, like plasterboard.

    So yes, take time to sort out the best places, private, council or whatever.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • I have spoken
    • By I have spoken 7th Sep 17, 7:17 PM
    • 4,963 Posts
    • 9,656 Thanks
    I have spoken
    Anything but the most trivial jobs will fill a household wheelie-bin and more
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 7th Sep 17, 8:34 PM
    • 2,577 Posts
    • 2,891 Thanks
    glasgowdan
    Anything but the most trivial jobs will fill a household wheelie-bin and more
    Originally posted by I have spoken
    If all you do is garden clearances, yes. But if you're doing grass cutting rounds and general fortnightly maintenance then a wheelie bin is more than enough. My rounds cover gardens from 8 minutes per visit to 3hrs. Min charge £25 applies to all jobs.
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 7th Sep 17, 9:58 PM
    • 23,221 Posts
    • 90,071 Thanks
    Jojo the Tightfisted
    A lot of people only get somebody in when they can't do something themselves, which includes cutting back shrubs and trees - a lot of shrubs actually turn into trees when neglected (eg, Cherry Laurel, which most people think of as a hedge). Once a trunk or branch is too thick to get your hands around it with your fingers touching, you're into chainsaw territory - and I don't care what the shops suggest, people need training in using the things; they're dangerous enough with a bow saw and loppers.

    And you'll need insurance - not just for your gear being nicked, but liability in case you happen to be pruning when a branch snaps off and take out a neighbour's car.

    Brushcutters, stumpcutters and suchlike are often needed - for those you'll also need training and insurance, along with full protective clothing, face protection, ear defenders, cushioned gloves to ensure you don't get vibration injuries - even a tank of petrol/40 minutes can be enough to cause you damage with the PPE, it'll take much less than that without.


    It sounds as though you're more akin to a handyman than a gardener, IMO, right now. Don't take on bigger jobs than that until you've got yourself proper equipment, PPE and training, as even the professional of many years that I know very well managed to amputate two fingers with a hedgecutter a couple of years ago - despite wearing PPE and having 30-odd years' experience.
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    Originally posted by colinw
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 7th Sep 17, 10:25 PM
    • 2,577 Posts
    • 2,891 Thanks
    glasgowdan
    A lot of people only get somebody in when they can't do something themselves, which includes cutting back shrubs and trees - a lot of shrubs actually turn into trees when neglected (eg, Cherry Laurel, which most people think of as a hedge). Once a trunk or branch is too thick to get your hands around it with your fingers touching, you're into chainsaw territory - and I don't care what the shops suggest, people need training in using the things; they're dangerous enough with a bow saw and loppers.

    And you'll need insurance - not just for your gear being nicked, but liability in case you happen to be pruning when a branch snaps off and take out a neighbour's car.

    Brushcutters, stumpcutters and suchlike are often needed - for those you'll also need training and insurance, along with full protective clothing, face protection, ear defenders, cushioned gloves to ensure you don't get vibration injuries - even a tank of petrol/40 minutes can be enough to cause you damage with the PPE, it'll take much less than that without.


    It sounds as though you're more akin to a handyman than a gardener, IMO, right now. Don't take on bigger jobs than that until you've got yourself proper equipment, PPE and training, as even the professional of many years that I know very well managed to amputate two fingers with a hedgecutter a couple of years ago - despite wearing PPE and having 30-odd years' experience.
    Originally posted by Jojo the Tightfisted
    How do you know how experienced the OP is at gardening? New to business but they may be far from a "handyman".

    Most of my customers are working couples and families who either want to spend their spare time socialising rather than gardening, or actively dislike the work but want the garden to look giod. The work is easy and quite routine as regular visits keep things smart and under control.

    OP, I would absolutely avoid doing big cutback jobs cheaply. Facebook groups bring out the worst customers in general. Avoid hourly rate charging too as it severely impairs your income.

    You don't need training or insurance to use mowers, blowers, brushcutter or hedge trimmers. There are so many little tricks you'll pick up to improve efficiency as you go.

    Go for it and don't be put off by seeing loads of local gardeners. Be 100% reliable and you'll stay busy. If you get every job you quote for then you're too cheap!
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 9th Sep 17, 10:46 AM
    • 698 Posts
    • 255 Thanks
    sevenhills
    If all you do is garden clearances, yes. But if you're doing grass cutting rounds and general fortnightly maintenance then a wheelie bin is more than enough. My rounds cover gardens from 8 minutes per visit to 3hrs. Min charge £25 applies to all jobs.
    Originally posted by glasgowdan
    I do some gardening work, I only do it in my spare time, I don't have a minimum price.
    All areas will be different, for disposing of waste; but I read that if its your main job, you need a license.
    I guess anyone doing it for reward, the waste should be classed as trade waste, but lots of people take waste to the council tip in their cars. They will only solve the issue when they start using ANPR

    Some people just want everything to be cut to level, minimum price, other want weeds removing and a clean garden.
    I take any waste that will help them.

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