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    • lukerichardson40
    • By lukerichardson40 5th Sep 17, 9:11 AM
    • 272Posts
    • 169Thanks
    lukerichardson40
    Medical negligence
    • #1
    • 5th Sep 17, 9:11 AM
    Medical negligence 5th Sep 17 at 9:11 AM
    Hi all,


    Unsure if this is the right section to ask, happy to delete if its wrong.


    Does anyone have any experience with medical negligence cases? Time frames, steps involved etc?


    If this is the right place I can provide more details.


    Thanks everyone.


    Luke
Page 2
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 5th Sep 17, 6:33 PM
    • 9,947 Posts
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    lincroft1710
    I think the only thing you can do is to wait and see what happens now. There's nothing you can do personally to push matters along. Just be patient and not too optimistic
    • NCC-1701
    • By NCC-1701 5th Sep 17, 7:04 PM
    • 192 Posts
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    NCC-1701
    Well........

    You say that, but bear in mind that you WERE taken back to land for treatment once it was determined that you were "very ill". So maybe that particular medic didn't carry out the last point, but your employer DID!

    Your symptoms, as per the NHS website, were consistent with a chest infection or something similarly milder. And you can't really treat a chest infection with antibiotics, so you probably wouldn't have been given anything (translation: "Fobbed off"). Just have to wait 1-3 weeks for it to run its course.

    So I'm a bit skeptical about there being negligence in the initial stages. But it could have been in the later stages.
    Originally posted by stuartJo1989
    Bacterial chest infections are treated with antibiotics day and daily.
    • stuartJo1989
    • By stuartJo1989 5th Sep 17, 7:16 PM
    • 245 Posts
    • 206 Thanks
    stuartJo1989
    Bacterial chest infections are treated with antibiotics day and daily.
    Originally posted by NCC-1701
    True! But the NHS states:

    Antibiotics aren't recommended for many chest infections, because they only work if the infection is caused by bacteria, rather than a virus.
    by NHS
    http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Chest-infection-adult/Pages/Introduction.aspx


    That sounds to me like many chest infections are caused by a virus, not bacteria. Hence the initial "Fobbing off". That's what I'm saying, if it was a mere chest infection then antibiotics probably would have been useless!

    Though OP mentioned pneumonia and the NHS also says "Your GP will usually only prescribe antibiotics if they think you have pneumonia, or you're at risk of complications such as fluid building up around the lungs (pleurisy)."

    Which adds a little twist I guess Would antibiotics have helped OP to recover from their fluid buildup/pneumonia even if it wasn't necessary for the most likely diagnosis?
    • stuartJo1989
    • By stuartJo1989 5th Sep 17, 7:19 PM
    • 245 Posts
    • 206 Thanks
    stuartJo1989
    I think the only thing you can do is to wait and see what happens now. There's nothing you can do personally to push matters along. Just be patient and not too optimistic
    Originally posted by lincroft1710
    Tbh I think a settlement is likely, just to get rid of OP and resolve it all. Wouldn't fancy playing this out in court though!
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 5th Sep 17, 7:29 PM
    • 9,947 Posts
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    lincroft1710
    Tbh I think a settlement is likely, just to get rid of OP and resolve it all. Wouldn't fancy playing this out in court though!
    Originally posted by stuartJo1989
    Let's hope OP's employers don't do this literally as they are who he is suing!
    • NCC-1701
    • By NCC-1701 5th Sep 17, 7:46 PM
    • 192 Posts
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    NCC-1701
    True! But the NHS states:



    http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Chest-infection-adult/Pages/Introduction.aspx


    That sounds to me like many chest infections are caused by a virus, not bacteria. Hence the initial "Fobbing off". That's what I'm saying, if it was a mere chest infection then antibiotics probably would have been useless!

    Though OP mentioned pneumonia and the NHS also says "Your GP will usually only prescribe antibiotics if they think you have pneumonia, or you're at risk of complications such as fluid building up around the lungs (pleurisy)."

    Which adds a little twist I guess Would antibiotics have helped OP to recover from their fluid buildup/pneumonia even if it wasn't necessary for the most likely diagnosis?
    Originally posted by stuartJo1989
    Taken from your own link:-

    Most bronchitis cases are caused by viruses, whereas most pneumonia cases are due to bacteria.

    Diagnosing an illness can sometimes be a case of 'best guess'. More so on an oilrig without access to laboratory facilities

    BTW I'm a 45 years qualified Microbiologist and have processed more sputum samples than I have hot dinners. Two months to retirement...YAY!
    • stuartJo1989
    • By stuartJo1989 5th Sep 17, 8:12 PM
    • 245 Posts
    • 206 Thanks
    stuartJo1989
    Taken from your own link:-

    Most bronchitis cases are caused by viruses, whereas most pneumonia cases are due to bacteria.

    Diagnosing an illness can sometimes be a case of 'best guess'. More so on an oilrig without access to laboratory facilities

    BTW I'm a 45 years qualified Microbiologist and have processed more sputum samples than I have hot dinners. Two months to retirement...YAY!
    Originally posted by NCC-1701
    Precisely! But the NHS seems to suggest that the symptoms presented are more likely due to a viral chest infection, and a medical practitioner would not be penalised (by the UK goverment/court) for following the information provided on the UK government's NHS website... At least in the initial stages.

    Think it is a different kettle of fish when (IF) OP reported more serious symptoms though, and that's where the grey area creeps in!

    Microbiology huh? Sounds like you've had quite a career One which would make J.T. Kirk proud, even if you didn't manage to figure out why Andorian blood was blue
    • peachyprice
    • By peachyprice 6th Sep 17, 9:04 AM
    • 18,721 Posts
    • 43,033 Thanks
    peachyprice
    BTW I'm a 45 years qualified Microbiologist and have processed more sputum samples than I have hot dinners. Two months to retirement...YAY!
    Originally posted by NCC-1701
    You disappoint me, I always picture you as captain of the SSE
    Accept your past without regret, handle your present with confidence and face your future without fear
    • lukerichardson40
    • By lukerichardson40 6th Sep 17, 5:20 PM
    • 272 Posts
    • 169 Thanks
    lukerichardson40
    Thanks for the replies guys. Interesting reading.


    I am pretty sure they wont get rid of me for this. They are a very good employer for the most part. Been with them almost 5 and a half years, and generally they are excellent.


    I will be sure to keep you updated. I assume the solicitors must think its worth pursuing, even after getting all the records, or they would have just stopped everything.
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