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  • FIRST POST
    • pmartin86
    • By pmartin86 4th Sep 17, 11:31 PM
    • 450Posts
    • 240Thanks
    pmartin86
    Ratining Wall used for Neigbours Garage
    • #1
    • 4th Sep 17, 11:31 PM
    Ratining Wall used for Neigbours Garage 4th Sep 17 at 11:31 PM
    Evening all

    I'll keepo this simple, feel free to ask if more information is required.

    I am responsible for a retaining wall on my properly, the drop to next door is aproxx 10ft. The wall has bneen in place since the house was built (1930~) but has shifted significatly in this time (base roughly 1.5ft) leaving the wall leaning at about 10 degrees. I want to replace the wall with something more solid and stable as Im' concerned about several cracks in it that are growing by 1-2mm per year. My issue is that next door have a grarage built right up to the wall using it as the main side wall, obviously if i remove and rebuild the wall, their garage is going to be damaged/destryoed - I just want to know my legal (and perhaps moral?) obligations prior to discussing it with them and getting quotes for the work.

    Regards
    Paul

    Edit: perhaps I should point out I am responsiblle for the BOUNDRY, I'm aware that marking the vbboundry is an oblgation, and not neccissaraly a physical barrier, but have no idea how thios pertains to retaining walls?
Page 1
    • I have spoken
    • By I have spoken 5th Sep 17, 6:57 AM
    • 4,963 Posts
    • 9,656 Thanks
    I have spoken
    • #2
    • 5th Sep 17, 6:57 AM
    • #2
    • 5th Sep 17, 6:57 AM
    Not clear, is the garage close to the wall or built using the wall? A picture would help.

    The static pressure from 10' of soil is huge. I'd expect you'll need sheet metal pilling to driven into the ground on your side of the wall.

    Last edited by I have spoken; 05-09-2017 at 7:38 AM.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 5th Sep 17, 8:08 AM
    • 23,965 Posts
    • 66,528 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #3
    • 5th Sep 17, 8:08 AM
    • #3
    • 5th Sep 17, 8:08 AM
    Boundaries and walls are different things. Being responsible for marking the boundary is very different to having ownership of a huge retaining wall.

    Anyone can put a fence or wall along the boundary. They own it, regardless of who the deeds say is responsible for marking the boundary. The boundary could be marked with string, or stones or a marker at either end.

    If their garage is on the wall and using it, it's certainly arguable that it's their wall. Or it's shared. It can't really be just yours.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • pmartin86
    • By pmartin86 6th Sep 17, 2:05 PM
    • 450 Posts
    • 240 Thanks
    pmartin86
    • #4
    • 6th Sep 17, 2:05 PM
    • #4
    • 6th Sep 17, 2:05 PM
    Hi Both

    The garage is built with the wall being used as the "side" of the garage. There are roof beams for the garage secured to the wall and obviously the roof on top of this, the wall then continues up another 5ft ~ and runs the length of the garden.

    How would I find out whos responsibe for the retaining section itself then? I'm happy to do what needs to be done, but obiously dont want to fork out a load of cash for something that i don't need to.

    Paul

    Edit: Not sure that its relevant, but the property next door is currently vacant, the occupier having sadly passed away about 6 months ago, the current owners actualy live a few doors down and are rather relaxed about its future at the moment, so may even be open to having the garage demolished and not replaced at all.
    Last edited by pmartin86; 06-09-2017 at 2:07 PM.
    • Wookey
    • By Wookey 6th Sep 17, 2:53 PM
    • 804 Posts
    • 404 Thanks
    Wookey
    • #5
    • 6th Sep 17, 2:53 PM
    • #5
    • 6th Sep 17, 2:53 PM
    I think your first port of call should be with the owner in a friendly manner whilst pointing out that rectification works could well be in order, if they sell up at some point in the future a purchasers survey will show up the potential hazards and could well be off putting in respect to obtaining mortgages.

    Is the wall tilting along it's entire length? Is the garage a sheet metal, flat or tiled roof?
    Last edited by Wookey; 06-09-2017 at 2:56 PM.
    Norn Iron Club member No 353
    • pmartin86
    • By pmartin86 6th Sep 17, 3:52 PM
    • 450 Posts
    • 240 Thanks
    pmartin86
    • #6
    • 6th Sep 17, 3:52 PM
    • #6
    • 6th Sep 17, 3:52 PM
    I fully intend to speak with the current owner and have every intention of "doing the right thing" - I'm just trying to establish exactly what I NEED to do vs what I COULD do.

    The wall is tilting alonmg the majority of the lenght, its gets slightly better towards the back end of the garden, when the drop (due to the way the hill is) is more like 2-3ft.

    The garage is ancient and is corrugated concrete, based on the age, I'll be treating ti as though its the kiond containing asbestos.

    As for mortguages, it was noted by the surveyer when i purchased the property originaly, but as the retaining wall that "holds the house" so to speak is in good condition for the length of the house and for several clear meters afterwards, it was only a "minor concern" - Basicly if the dodgy bit does collapse, my neightor loses their garage and gains a lot of earth and plants on their lawn
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 6th Sep 17, 3:59 PM
    • 28,524 Posts
    • 72,657 Thanks
    Mojisola
    • #7
    • 6th Sep 17, 3:59 PM
    • #7
    • 6th Sep 17, 3:59 PM
    I think your first port of call should be with the owner in a friendly manner whilst pointing out that rectification works could well be in order, if they sell up at some point in the future a purchasers survey will show up the potential hazards and could well be off putting in respect to obtaining mortgages.
    Originally posted by Wookey
    The wall is tilting alonmg the majority of the lenght, its gets slightly better towards the back end of the garden, when the drop (due to the way the hill is) is more like 2-3ft.

    Basicly if the dodgy bit does collapse, my neightor loses their garage and gains a lot of earth and plants on their lawn
    Originally posted by pmartin86
    With the wall as you describe, viewers will probably walk away.

    It will be in the owners' interests to let you get the work done.
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