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    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 4th Sep 17, 6:47 PM
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    Dentist and hygienist - different practices
    • #1
    • 4th Sep 17, 6:47 PM
    Dentist and hygienist - different practices 4th Sep 17 at 6:47 PM
    I am a private patient - so would imagine I can do what suits me personally then in this respect.

    Can anyone confirm whether I can have a dentist in one practice and a hygienist in a different practice?

    Reason being - I'm fine with the dentist in the practice I'm currently using and they do the best job I've had out of any dentist so far and so I'd like to keep them.

    But the hygienist on the other hand - and they do by far the worst job I've ever had from one and cause me noticeably more pain/discomfort than I usually get from a hygienist and they are the only one this practice has. Hence I want to go to a hygienist from another practice.

    A nuisance to have to use two practices - but I'd rather not risk losing a good dentist for the sake of getting rid of a bad hygienist. So I've decided to have two practices - one for each.

    Now is it possible for a private patient to do this in this country?
    If there's "4 tendencies" type of people (Gretchen Rubin) = yep....Questioner type here
    - Meets an expectation only if they believe it's justified and resists anything arbitrary or ineffective
Page 1
    • Contessa
    • By Contessa 4th Sep 17, 10:24 PM
    • 965 Posts
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    Contessa
    • #2
    • 4th Sep 17, 10:24 PM
    • #2
    • 4th Sep 17, 10:24 PM
    Sorry I don't actually know the answer to your question-but do understand your aversion to the hygienist.

    In my last NHS practice I had an excellent dentist but I after my first appointment with a hygienist I lost confidence in her. I found her to be quite rough and after a clean and polish when I rinsed out an old crown just came away.

    I saw another dentst in the practice straight away and my usual one the next morning but it was a gonner.

    I realise that the crown was very old but had never caused any problems, and am also aware that they don't last forever. But, I do wonder as she was so harsh compared to other hygienists.

    Afterwards, I always booked an appointment with a different one.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 5th Sep 17, 6:26 AM
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    • #3
    • 5th Sep 17, 6:26 AM
    • #3
    • 5th Sep 17, 6:26 AM
    That's very bad then - ie losing a crown. Thanks for confirming that there are indeed some hygienists that are particularly rough - compared to the norm. Her verdict on other hygienists seems to be "Oh...they arent doing it properly. They're leaving some scale".

    She's also (let's say) got a "very convenient" memory for what I've said. That being she seems to remember what she wishes I'd said (to suit her), rather than what I actually did say - which is very different.

    When I started to click to what she's like - then I did book their other one. But they are back to Mrs Roughhouse only now for some reason - hence I need a different practice to get a different hygienist.
    Last edited by moneyistooshorttomention; 05-09-2017 at 6:30 AM.
    If there's "4 tendencies" type of people (Gretchen Rubin) = yep....Questioner type here
    - Meets an expectation only if they believe it's justified and resists anything arbitrary or ineffective
    • brook2jack
    • By brook2jack 5th Sep 17, 9:20 AM
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    brook2jack
    • #4
    • 5th Sep 17, 9:20 AM
    • #4
    • 5th Sep 17, 9:20 AM
    The regulations changed some time ago so you can see a hygienist in another practice without seeing a dentist at that practice. However not all hygienists are happy to do this so you may need to ring around.
    • pearl123
    • By pearl123 5th Sep 17, 9:45 AM
    • 1,137 Posts
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    pearl123
    • #5
    • 5th Sep 17, 9:45 AM
    • #5
    • 5th Sep 17, 9:45 AM
    Just see the hygienist you want. If your dentist asks why tell the truth.
    • Toothsmith
    • By Toothsmith 5th Sep 17, 10:37 AM
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    Toothsmith
    • #6
    • 5th Sep 17, 10:37 AM
    • #6
    • 5th Sep 17, 10:37 AM
    It is possible to do this.

    Whether you would find a practice willing to let you just use their hygienist, and the original dentist let you use his/her services whilst not seeing their hygienist is a different matter.

    Hygienists do get a bad press - but they are only cleaning off what you miss! If you brushed your teeth well enough to not build up tartar, then every visit to any hygienist would be a breeze.

    What if, after a few visits to an alternative hygienist, your dentist noticed that your gums were deteriorating? He would not really have any control over a hygienist on someone else's payroll. Relations with the 'good' dentist could become very strained.

    I have 2 very thorough hygienists, and there is generally an inverse relationship between how good patients are at toothbrushing, and how much they moan about the hygienist!! That is, up to the point where they actually have a problem with gum disease - then they generally appreciate the difference between a good thorough one, and one that just tickles.

    If pain & sensitivity are a problem, then there are anaesthetics that can be used if you let her know how uncomfortable you find it. If it's a good practice, that shouldn't be difficult?

    As for hygienists taking crowns off or fillings out - yes, it does happen. But it wouldn't happen if a crown/filling was sound and well held in. From what you write Contessa it sounds like your tooth was pretty rotten underneath your crown, if it couldn't be saved. This again is not uncommon, as even on x-ray, you can't see what's happening under crowns. It would more than likely have come off whilst eating at some point in the next few weeks anyway. It could even have flared up and given you trouble. So although it doesn't feel like it, she probably did you a favour by discovering the problem.

    Personally, I like having good thorough hygienists. If people do have a problem with that, I would much sooner they went elsewhere anyway. I first introduced hygienists to the practice about 17 years ago. My main one is still that one I first employed all that time ago. In that time, I have seen the dental health of the patients that have stuck with it improve remarkably.

    It is perfectly possible that this hygienist isn't very nice, or good - but it not being a pleasant experience isn't really enough for me to say one way or another, and my feeling is, she's probably quite good!
    How to find a dentist.
    1. Get recommendations from friends/family/neighbours/etc.
    2. Once you have a short-list, VISIT the practices - dont just phone. Go on the pretext of getting a Practice Leaflet.
    3. Assess the helpfulness of the staff and the level of the facilities.
    4. Only book initial appointment when you find a place you are happy with.
    • comeandgo
    • By comeandgo 5th Sep 17, 10:44 AM
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    comeandgo
    • #7
    • 5th Sep 17, 10:44 AM
    • #7
    • 5th Sep 17, 10:44 AM
    I was beginning to wonder why I had never been to a hygienist, but it seems like a good thing, not bad.
    • Contessa
    • By Contessa 5th Sep 17, 11:48 PM
    • 965 Posts
    • 1,376 Thanks
    Contessa
    • #8
    • 5th Sep 17, 11:48 PM
    • #8
    • 5th Sep 17, 11:48 PM
    Thanks, Toothsmith. The crown was indeed very old but had never been a problem. I do realise that they have a limited life but unfortunately the experience has left me dreading seeing a hygienist.

    It would have been helpful if my concern had been acknowledged and an explanation given - rather than "It's a goner. Nothing more to be done"

    When booking future appointments I made sure I saw a different hygienist and told them what happened and how I feared a repeat. To be fair they were all much gentler - even if that means not as thorough?? - but at least I wasn't afraid to go back.

    Years before, in a different part of the country, I had an appointment with a hygienist early on Monday morning. I knew I was in for a very unpleasant experience as she immediately told me her boyfriend had ditched her the day before! And so she continued throughout the treatment. Had I been able to speak I would have told her she should take it out on her boyfriend not me!

    But at least my crown was still intact afterwards!
    • BrassicWoman
    • By BrassicWoman 6th Sep 17, 8:43 AM
    • 1,304 Posts
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    BrassicWoman
    • #9
    • 6th Sep 17, 8:43 AM
    • #9
    • 6th Sep 17, 8:43 AM
    I asked my dentist to do my hygeine work and bill accordingly. I find hygeinists to be purveyors of pain.
    Downsized and mortgage free
    September 17 grocery challenge £64.28/£100
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 6th Sep 17, 9:35 AM
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    pollypenny
    On my first visit to the new dentist, after retirement of original, I was told how good my teeth were and 'I can't even clean them for you. Come back in a year.'

    Forward two years and the practice employed a hygienist. I endured her a couple of times, but after her brusqueness, verging on rudeness, last time I said no more.

    I now have a NH clean, although dentist says my brushing and intra-dental work are excellent and I don't really need it.
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • brook2jack
    • By brook2jack 6th Sep 17, 9:53 AM
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    brook2jack
    Most people should never need a hygienist. Tartar is just plaque that has been undisturbed for 48 hours. In other words effective cleaning stops tartar forming.

    Unfortunately only around 20 % of the British population brushes properly, less than half use floss or tepe brushes and of those that do , most are not using them properly.

    If you do see a hygienist take your brush, floss, tepe brush etc with you and get them to check you are cleaning properly and effectively. It will save you needing to see them again. A hygienist just gets the tartar off so that you can clean and control your gum problems.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 6th Sep 17, 6:36 PM
    • 13,433 Posts
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    I do do brush and floss and TePe brush and whatever-its-called brush on the gumlines and twice daily (vast majority of days)......whew...whew...whew...

    So I'm at a bit of a loss - as I'm trying my best honest injun.....and I still get told "Hygienist - twice a year - if not 4 times a year".
    If there's "4 tendencies" type of people (Gretchen Rubin) = yep....Questioner type here
    - Meets an expectation only if they believe it's justified and resists anything arbitrary or ineffective
    • brook2jack
    • By brook2jack 7th Sep 17, 9:37 AM
    • 3,998 Posts
    • 3,623 Thanks
    brook2jack
    I do do brush and floss and TePe brush and whatever-its-called brush on the gumlines and twice daily (vast majority of days)......whew...whew...whew...

    So I'm at a bit of a loss - as I'm trying my best honest injun.....and I still get told "Hygienist - twice a year - if not 4 times a year".
    Originally posted by moneyistooshorttomention

    Have you asked the hygienist/dentist to check you are using the right size tepes etc and have they watched you to make sure you are using the right technique? All you have to do is to clean away the plaque within 48 to 72 hours of it getting on your teeth and tartar cannot build up.

    If they are talking about four visits a year then you have gum problems and the other thing to look at is factors which can affect gum health e.g. Diabetes, smoking,dry mouth and take steps to control that.
    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 7th Sep 17, 4:10 PM
    • 8,223 Posts
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    teddysmum
    I asked my dentist to do my hygeine work and bill accordingly. I find hygeinists to be purveyors of pain.
    Originally posted by BrassicWoman


    In the practice I use (NHS),the dentist asks if you would like the hygiene work done, when they have finished an examination and this is included in the stage one price.


    The dentist I have now is gentle, but the one before her was a horror. He really hurt me (my mouth is rather small as she has commented) while cleaning my teeth, but she said his response to the effect that I should expect pain, was nonsense.


    Thank goodness he went back to Poland for a month's holiday and decided to stay and so was replaced by the lady dentist.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 7th Sep 17, 5:17 PM
    • 13,433 Posts
    • 36,608 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    Have you asked the hygienist/dentist to check you are using the right size tepes etc and have they watched you to make sure you are using the right technique? All you have to do is to clean away the plaque within 48 to 72 hours of it getting on your teeth and tartar cannot build up.

    If they are talking about four visits a year then you have gum problems and the other thing to look at is factors which can affect gum health e.g. Diabetes, smoking,dry mouth and take steps to control that.
    Originally posted by brook2jack
    No diabetes - got told pre-diabetes at one point - but dealt with (past history). Am pretty conscious its never been there to my knowledge in my family and am transitioning over from genuinely healthy diet to super-healthy diet.

    Smoking - never

    Dry mouth - I'm blowed if I can figure it out why or how to get shot of it - but I do have nights where I wake up with a very "dry mouth" recently. Must try harder - and figure out cause and cure of that.. Am pretty conscious of making sure I drink enough these days - as I'm assuming it's some sort of dehydration thing that I occasionally get that.

    Holds hands up and admits there was a spell of a few years where I was a bit neglectful (ahem...ahem...dont think I went to dentist for a few years - whoops!) - but I got told and I dealt with it and am "trying hard" these days. I know my gums receded a bit a few years back (coincident with that few years of neglect) and hence trying hard - as I'm told I have very good teeth per se and "would be a shame to lose any". I'm trying not to ever lose any at all.
    Last edited by moneyistooshorttomention; 07-09-2017 at 5:24 PM.
    If there's "4 tendencies" type of people (Gretchen Rubin) = yep....Questioner type here
    - Meets an expectation only if they believe it's justified and resists anything arbitrary or ineffective
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