Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • Lurkingtoposting17
    • By Lurkingtoposting17 1st Sep 17, 10:15 PM
    • 79Posts
    • 88Thanks
    Lurkingtoposting17
    EA being vague on house I'm purchasing
    • #1
    • 1st Sep 17, 10:15 PM
    EA being vague on house I'm purchasing 1st Sep 17 at 10:15 PM
    Hey folks

    This one might be nothing but I'm coming up at a loose end.

    My vendor rented his property (to family) Property is now vacant and vendor has moved to another city with family as they moved in together (according to my solicitor two weeks ago...)

    I asked then if I could see the property empty before agreeing to exchange contracts as often when I had tried to see again after my offer I was told unless I could come in the day it would be a no, and due to work obligations that didn't work.

    I've been chasing the estate agent all week to see the property again, and I've been repeatedly ignored or told they aren't sure what's happening and need to look into it.

    The property is definitely vacant (we've checked...) and my solicitor have said they are suprised they haven't heard from my vendors solicitors all week (she assumed now property was vacant they'd be chasing me down to exchange and complete ASAP...)

    Im beginning to wonder if vendor wants me to exchange without seeing the property again for some reason... which is only making me more convinced I need to!

    Does this seem normal to anyone?! Or any logical reasons why ea would be reluctant to let me see property again?

    I'm thinking it's ftb paranoia but, I can't understand why in two weeks the EA hasn't rushed me in their considering I've said it's the only thing stopping me exchanging? (And them bagging their commission?)
Page 1
    • Thrugelmir
    • By Thrugelmir 1st Sep 17, 10:18 PM
    • 55,239 Posts
    • 48,490 Thanks
    Thrugelmir
    • #2
    • 1st Sep 17, 10:18 PM
    • #2
    • 1st Sep 17, 10:18 PM
    Perhaps they are away on holiday this week.
    “ “Bull markets are born on pessimism, grow on skepticism, mature on optimism, and die on euphoria. The time of maximum pessimism is the best time to buy, and the time of maximum optimism is the best time to sell.” Sir John Marks Templeton
    • owitemisermusa
    • By owitemisermusa 2nd Sep 17, 2:22 AM
    • 931 Posts
    • 277 Thanks
    owitemisermusa
    • #3
    • 2nd Sep 17, 2:22 AM
    • #3
    • 2nd Sep 17, 2:22 AM
    If you can't view and satisfy yourself completely, don't buy.
    Tough times never last longer than tough people.
    • G_M
    • By G_M 2nd Sep 17, 12:07 PM
    • 41,096 Posts
    • 47,242 Thanks
    G_M
    • #4
    • 2nd Sep 17, 12:07 PM
    • #4
    • 2nd Sep 17, 12:07 PM
    You're being sensible.

    There may be a perfectly innocent explanation for the lack of response (eg as suggested - holiday), or as you say, the tenants may have trashed the place when they left.

    Politely make it clear, to both the EA and your solicitor, ideally in writing, that you will not Exchange until you've had another viewing.
    • Lurkingtoposting17
    • By Lurkingtoposting17 5th Sep 17, 8:10 PM
    • 79 Posts
    • 88 Thanks
    Lurkingtoposting17
    • #5
    • 5th Sep 17, 8:10 PM
    • #5
    • 5th Sep 17, 8:10 PM
    Finally got in today after telling agent i would pull out from sale if I didn't see it this week after vendor asked if I was ready to exchange now...!

    But end result is the same... with all the furniture out and without the vendor covering the jobs they have bodged with furniture and appliances, it's become apparent how much work the property needed. I had budgeted £5k for work to the property, and now realised its more like £20k.

    It would be a money pit. I left in tears and learnt a valuable life lesson. If you vendor seems to be hiding something, they likely are.

    Thanks everyone for your help and support - back to the drawing board that is right move!
    • Mutton Geoff
    • By Mutton Geoff 5th Sep 17, 8:25 PM
    • 866 Posts
    • 912 Thanks
    Mutton Geoff
    • #6
    • 5th Sep 17, 8:25 PM
    • #6
    • 5th Sep 17, 8:25 PM
    Well done, you have displayed an incredible amount of maturity for a first time buyer. Don't be afraid to do it again, and again, until you find a place that is right for you.
    Compensations/Refunds from Banks & Institutions - £4,165 | Stooz Profits - £7,636 | Quidco - £3,963

    All with a big thank you to Martin and MSE.com from Mutton Geoff!
    • G_M
    • By G_M 5th Sep 17, 8:53 PM
    • 41,096 Posts
    • 47,242 Thanks
    G_M
    • #7
    • 5th Sep 17, 8:53 PM
    • #7
    • 5th Sep 17, 8:53 PM
    But do bear in mind that all properties look far less attractive once the furniture, pictures etc are removed.

    If you view a property occupied by the owners/sellers, you'll be viewing it with furniture etc.

    On the day of Completion, they'll empty it. The carpets under the furniture will have faded at a different rate to the exposed carpets. Likewise the paint on the walls where the pictures were.

    But with an owner/occupier you'll only find out when you move in. So be realistic about what to expect of that 'immaculate' looking house......
    Last edited by G_M; 05-09-2017 at 9:20 PM.
    • Lurkingtoposting17
    • By Lurkingtoposting17 5th Sep 17, 9:18 PM
    • 79 Posts
    • 88 Thanks
    Lurkingtoposting17
    • #8
    • 5th Sep 17, 9:18 PM
    • #8
    • 5th Sep 17, 9:18 PM
    Hi GM

    I completely agree when I was waiting for my parents to arrive at the property I was wondering if I was over reacting but they walked in and felt the same. We've never lived in a new build, and one precious home had been empty for ten years when my parents purchased it so we don't expect perfection in a home by any standards.

    issues such as a kitchen that has been bodged to stop it falling down and numerous cupboards don't even open as they back on to each other. The tenant was cooking when we viewed both times and I didn't push thinking I could come back and then, they made viewing again difficult.

    The rewiring in the house has only been done to half the property - and a gaping hole in the ceiling where this wiring has been done that was hidden by a large unit and a wardrobe in the room above they conveniently left behind is covering that hole in the floor in the bedroom. We couldn't have checked this as it was a large unit stuffed to the brim with their personal possessions.

    There's also a huge amount of damp in one room. They had damp proofing done last year and told us it was to the whole property. Looking at the property today we think this was only downstairs.

    The electric fuse box isn't where we were told it was when we enquiried whilst this doesn't sound a big deal the difference in location means it has to be moved. Not for compliance of any standards but because it's smack bang in the middle the living room wall that has been covered by the unit. They had stated it was under the stairs.

    I will shoulder some of the blame as my dad is a builder and I think he could have identified more of these things when he viewed too but he says he was reasonably satisfied when he looked, but didn't delve into it too deep. I should have pushed him to be more forensic. He was shocked at the pictures I've showed him.

    I've learnt a lot from the process and will definitely insist on being more forensic in viewing properties going forward. I won't let a vendor intimidate me into not looking in cupboards or around rooms in depth. I guess I was a little naive in how much too investigate or how much right I had to.

    I will be grateful I paid for my conveyancers insurance so it hasn't been an expensive lesson.
    • phillw
    • By phillw 6th Sep 17, 9:36 AM
    • 827 Posts
    • 433 Thanks
    phillw
    • #9
    • 6th Sep 17, 9:36 AM
    • #9
    • 6th Sep 17, 9:36 AM
    I had budgeted £5k for work to the property, and now realised its more like £20k.
    Originally posted by Lurkingtoposting17
    Did you explain this to them and ask if they would drop the price by £20k?
    • Lurkingtoposting17
    • By Lurkingtoposting17 6th Sep 17, 10:50 AM
    • 79 Posts
    • 88 Thanks
    Lurkingtoposting17
    I could do PhillW, but it won't release 20k cash to me, as it would mostly be coming off the mortgage, it would give me around another £5k to do the work, so still significantly less.

    As the EA witnessed me leaving in tears right now I am just taking a breather on it today and waiting for him to call. I think I will tell him that the property needs far more work doing than we budgeted for and that I don't think the vendor would drop the price to something I would feel comfortable with having reassessed.

    I'll leave the ball in his court to decide if he wants to renegotiate based on that information. He may, as the property is vacant and he is ~300 miles away, but I am not sure I want the hassle of such a fixer upper to be enthused enough to start the negotiations myself, if that make sense. Not to mention the mention I just don't trust this vendor, I haven't for months. Felt like he was hiding something. I dread to think what I would discover he'd hidden in the past two weeks as the reason he wouldn't let me view is he wanted to make sure it was nice for me....
    • phillw
    • By phillw 6th Sep 17, 5:04 PM
    • 827 Posts
    • 433 Thanks
    phillw
    I could do PhillW, but it won't release 20k cash to me, as it would mostly be coming off the mortgage, it would give me around another £5k to do the work, so still significantly less.
    Originally posted by Lurkingtoposting17
    You could talk to the mortgage company and say you have reduced the purchase price but will borrow the original amount but use £20 for improvements. It might screw you on LTV, but they might let you do it.

    You shouldn't worry about opening the negotiation, but if you can't get hold of him or don't want the hassle of doing the work then sure just walk away.

    But you would only get one chance to negotiate, so find all the things wrong and dump it on him and see what happens.
    Last edited by phillw; 06-09-2017 at 5:06 PM.
    • csgohan4
    • By csgohan4 6th Sep 17, 6:31 PM
    • 3,775 Posts
    • 2,356 Thanks
    csgohan4
    I would personally go and knock off 35k take it or leave it and do the house up as you get more money if you want it badly
    "It is prudent when shopping for something important, not to limit yourself to Pound land"
    • catshark88
    • By catshark88 6th Sep 17, 6:51 PM
    • 905 Posts
    • 5,342 Thanks
    catshark88
    If you would still like to buy the property, offer the new sum that it is worth to you.

    The owner is now aware of its' condition and won't be able to hide it from a future buyer. In the meantime, you are ready/ almost ready to exchange. You could be in a very strong position.
    "Have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful." William Morris
    • Corona
    • By Corona 6th Sep 17, 9:00 PM
    • 820 Posts
    • 729 Thanks
    Corona
    I'm always a little wary when someone has just moved out and gone elsewhere, leaving the property empty. yes, I know there are sometimes reasons why this is necessary - like a new job, or if someone is sick and needs to be nearer relatives to be cared for (or even died, of course !) Or their dream house came up and financed it with a bridging loan. But the fact that they have gone and the house has been left in such a state makes me wonder if they were in a hurry to leave, e.g. for example, were they having problems with the neighbours ? During the searches, did anything come up about neighbourhood disputes or any problems being reported?

    Am probably being a bit over suspicious, but before you commit to buying a property, listen carefully to your gut instinct. If something just doesn't feel right, walk away.
    • goodwithsaving
    • By goodwithsaving 6th Sep 17, 9:22 PM
    • 627 Posts
    • 960 Thanks
    goodwithsaving
    Out of curiosity (not to pinpoint, more for my benefit as I am buying and although not an FTB, can still always learn from others) - did you get a survey?
    I am going for a pre-exchange viewing and have had a detailed survey report (albeit only homebuyers, but much more thorough than other homebuyer surveys I have had previously). You've reminded me how hard I need to look so I don't think 'oh lord what have I done' when I move (which I did last time - and that's on a property I knew needed renovating and had 20k set aside to do it)
    Every time you borrow money, you’re robbing your future self. –Nathan W. Morris
    • csgohan4
    • By csgohan4 6th Sep 17, 9:27 PM
    • 3,775 Posts
    • 2,356 Thanks
    csgohan4
    Out of curiosity (not to pinpoint, more for my benefit as I am buying and although not an FTB, can still always learn from others) - did you get a survey?
    I am going for a pre-exchange viewing and have had a detailed survey report (albeit only homebuyers, but much more thorough than other homebuyer surveys I have had previously). You've reminded me how hard I need to look so I don't think 'oh lord what have I done' when I move (which I did last time - and that's on a property I knew needed renovating and had 20k set aside to do it)
    Originally posted by goodwithsaving
    Survey may not have picked everything up, they are not allowed to drill walls or move vendors furniture
    "It is prudent when shopping for something important, not to limit yourself to Pound land"
    • Lurkingtoposting17
    • By Lurkingtoposting17 6th Sep 17, 10:56 PM
    • 79 Posts
    • 88 Thanks
    Lurkingtoposting17
    I discussed with my parents when home tonight (I am living with them).

    Dad begged me to pull out and not renegotiate as he feels it would be a money pit and though the house appears affordable he worries that it would be a money pit in renovation/ repairs with so many hidden problems. So i will pull out.

    My parents have, very kindly offered to renovate their spare living room (used for storage) to be my own office and living space (I work from home 1/2 days a week) in so many ways I am very fortunate.

    The tightening of lending criteria means I need to look to save another £20k or so to borrow what I was offered this time around which will take around a year if I stay at home.

    I'm probably too old to still be here but as dad has just said, he wants me to live a life I love, and never be worried about money or debts. There's no point only a home to live in, if you have no money left to do that living.

    Goodwithsaving - dads in the building trade so no, we didn't survey. He had admitted there are some things he could have looked at closer and maybe would have spotted some of the issues, but others like the hole in the floor, he would never have managed with their stuff in situ.

    So for now; I'll go back to lurking the forums here and educating myself so that next time I'll be an expert...!

    Thanks a million lovely MSErs
    • goodwithsaving
    • By goodwithsaving 6th Sep 17, 11:51 PM
    • 627 Posts
    • 960 Thanks
    goodwithsaving
    csgohan4 - I know, but at least it's a start on uncovering things which are potentially pitfalls.

    lurkingtoposting17 - don't be disheartened. find somewhere else. these things are meant to be and maybe the next place will be even better
    Every time you borrow money, you’re robbing your future self. –Nathan W. Morris
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

4,667Posts Today

6,041Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • RT @iiSteveJonesii: @MartinSLewis After watching you talk this morning about me burning £300 I got on a comparison site tonight & sure enou?

  • In or near York? This Wed the @itvmlshow Roadshow" will be at the York Food & Drink Festival - do come and say hi; St Sampsons Square 11-4.

  • It's the subtle poetry and lyricism of tweets like this that I find so endearing https://t.co/XhSKBCGyXe

  • Follow Martin